Swedish developers focused on their next project in Steamboat Springs | SteamboatToday.com

Swedish developers focused on their next project in Steamboat Springs

The managers and investors in the existing Flour Mill workforce housing development —formerly known as the Iron Horse — are in discussions with city of Steamboat Springs planning officials about tentative plans to develop new housing on 7.5 acres on the city's west side. Pictured, from left, are Jon Sanders of Ski Town Commercial, Johan Monsen and Ulf Clacton of Swed Properties, and Brandon Dardanis of Ski Town Commercial. Monsen and Clacton are from Sweden.





The managers and investors in the existing Flour Mill workforce housing development —formerly known as the Iron Horse — are in discussions with city of Steamboat Springs planning officials about tentative plans to develop new housing on 7.5 acres on the city’s west side. Pictured, from left, are Jon Sanders of Ski Town Commercial, Johan Monsen and Ulf Clacton of Swed Properties, and Brandon Dardanis of Ski Town Commercial. Monsen and Clacton are from Sweden.
Tom Ross

— Johan Monsen and Ulf Clacton, the Swedish investors who acquired the former Iron Horse in Steamboat Springs with principles in Ski Town Commercial, said this week they have met with city planning officials to discuss their interest in developing another workforce housing project at a West Steamboat site.

If everything goes well, Monsen and Clacton said they would like to deliver a community of small, manufactured single-family homes to the market by late summer 2018. The homes, at about 440 square feet, would be developed on 7.5 acres along the southern boundary of The Reserves affordable apartments.

The development team is hoping to gain city approvals for a minimum of 30 and a maximum of 37 free-standing homes built to sustainable standards, plus a two-story, 16-unit apartment building located to the rear of the site.

Monsen and Clacton are working with Ski Town Commercial’s Jon Sanders and Brandon Dardanis on the project.

"This is a perfect place for the city to grow," Monsen said.

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The site is behind two small commercial buildings acquired by Swed Properties on lower Elk River Road where construction crews are working on a new home for Storm Peak Brewing Company.

Sanders said gaining city approval for high density and reduced parking are critical to the group's plans, and the developers are aware they need to improve access to the site. Because the land is not zoned for single-family developments, they will anticipate entering the city planning process in the "planned unit development" process to achieve something akin to mobile home zoning.

Monsen and Clacton each have their own companies but have collaborated on city center developments in large cities in Sweden. Monsen's commercial real estate company is Faseab, and Clacton's development company is Estancia Fastigheter.

The two men say their working model is to acquire properties with untapped potential and redevelop them.

"The way we're working in Sweden, we don't buy raw land or things that are fully developed," Monsen said. “We want something where you can change the use or enhance it."

Sanders compared Monsen’s and Clacton's business model to the redevelopment of the Rino District in North Denver where neighborhoods of old warehouse were transformed into retail and apartment buildings.

Monsen, who attended the University of Wyoming and coached at the Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club in the early 1980s, has a home here, and he and his wife, Karen Koster Monsen, often spend summers in Steamboat.

To reach Tom Ross, call 970-871-4205, email tross@SteamboatToday.com or follow him on Twitter @ThomasSRoss1