Steamboat briefs: Youth corps to hold meeting about project building plans | SteamboatToday.com

Steamboat briefs: Youth corps to hold meeting about project building plans

Rocky Mountain Youth Corps will hold a public meeting for anyone interested in learning more about its capital project plans to construct a warehouse structure and renovate the existing office building on its property at 991 Captain Jack Drive in Steamboat Springs. The meeting, which is open to the community, will be held at the location at 11 a.m., Aug. 10. All are invited. Call Kate for more information at 970-879-2135.

Council to host Tour de Coop themed garden tour

The Yampa Valley Sustainability Council is hosting its annual Green Gardens Tour. and the topic is Tour de Coop, featuring four innovative chicken coops downtown on at 5 p.m. Tuesday. After the tour, there will be a deviled egg contest, with an egg-themed prize for the top winner. To submit an egg recipe to be tasted at the event, call YVSC at 970-871-9299 or email info@yvsc.org anytime before the event. Visit yvsc.org/gardentour for more information.

Yampa Valley Singers to rehearse at church in August

The Yampa Valley Singers will begin weekly rehearsals from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Aug. 11 at the United Methodist Church of Steamboat Springs. Singers are encouraged to join this community choral group to prepare for their next concert to be held Nov. 6 and 7. For more information and to register with a $35 fee, contact Ruth McClelland at 970-879-2641.

VNA offers tips to prevent foodborne illnesses

The Northwest Colorado Visiting Nurse Association is advising precautions to avoid foodborne illness, particularly through the summer and fall.

Each year, one in six Americans are sickened from consuming foods or beverages contaminated with disease-causing microbes or pathogens. The VNA recommends the following precautions to reduce the risk of contracting foodborne illness.

■ Always wash your hands with soap and water before preparing food.

Recommended Stories For You

■ Cook meat, poultry and eggs thoroughly. Use a food thermometer to measure internal temperature of meat.  

■ Wash hands, utensils and cutting boards after they have been in contact with raw meat or poultry and before they touch another food.

■ Refrigerate leftovers that won't be eaten within four hours. Bacteria can grow quickly at room temperature.

■ Wash produce in running tap water. Remove outermost leaves of a lettuce or cabbage. Bacteria can grow well on the cut surface of a fruit or vegetable. Take care not to contaminate produce while slicing on a cutting board, and don't leave cut produce out for many hours.

■ Keep food away from flies and insects.

Common symptoms of foodborne illness include vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever and chills. Avoid preparing food for others if you have these symptoms. Pregnant women, the elderly and those with weakened immune systems are at higher risk for severe infections and should not to consume undercooked animal products. Contact your healthcare provider if you think you have a foodborne illness. For more information, visit cdc.gov/foodsafety/facts.

Childbirth classes set for 11:30 a.m. Sept. 12, 13

An intense weekend of childbirth education classes is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 12 and 13 in the small meeting room at Bud Werner Memorial Library.

Titled "Primal Birthing (The Art of Childbirth) … Childbirth & Breastfeeding Education" the class will explore the philosophy and importance of giving birth naturally, reigniting a woman's innate power and wisdom to do so without intervention. This class is interactive and realistic, providing both an academic and emotional preparation for birth.

The cost is $125 per couple, and the sign-up deadline is Aug. 31.

Call Tera Johnson-Swartz at 970-819-0728 or email tera@organicknead.com to register.