Steamboat briefs: Emerald Mountain reopened for recreational use | SteamboatToday.com

Steamboat briefs: Emerald Mountain reopened for recreational use







The helicopter logging that took place Monday, Sept. 26 to extract logged trees from the Morning Gloria trail corridor is now complete, and Emerald Mountain has reopened for recreational use.

Existing trail closures remain in effect including Root Canal, Upper and Middle Stairway to Heaven and Upper No Mo' Bluez. The upper portion of Morning Gloria will reopen Wednesday.

The logging was part of a hazard tree mitigation project on Emerald that began in July. It is a collaborative project between the city of Steamboat Springs and the Colorado State Forest Service.

World Rabies Day reminds residents to bat-proof home

World Rabies Day Wednesday highlights the importance of preventing human and pet contact with bats, which can carry the potentially deadly rabies virus. Other wild animals may also carry the disease.

Most bats leave in the fall to hibernate, so it's a good time to bat proof your home. It's best to contact an animal-control or wildlife conservation agency for assistance. the following are suggestions if you choose to do it yourself.

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■ Carefully examine your home for holes that might allow bats entry. Caulk any openings larger than a quarter-inch by a half-inch.

■ Use window screens, chimney caps and draft-guards beneath doors. Fill electrical and plumbing holes with stainless steel wool or caulking, and ensure that all doors to the outside close tightly.

■ Prevent bats from roosting in attics or buildings by covering outside entry points. During summer months, observe where the bats exit at dusk and keep them from coming back by loosely hanging clear plastic sheeting or bird netting over these areas. Bats can crawl out and leave but cannot re-enter. When all the bats are gone, the openings can be permanently sealed.

■ Make sure pets are up to date on rabies vaccine. In Colorado, pets that are unvaccinated or overdue for a booster have to be quarantined for up to 120 days or possibly euthanized if they've had sufficient exposure to a bat or other wild animal that may carry rabies. For more information about rabies, visit cdc.gov/rabies.

Foreign film series to screen American indie feature film

Bud Werner Memorial Library's free foreign film features "The Automatic Hate," an American indie film directed by Justing Lerner, at 7 p.m. at the Chief Theater. The film has been called "one of the 10 best" at SXSW 2015.

When Davis Green's alluring young cousin Alexis appears on his doorstep one night, he discovers that a side of his family has been kept secret from him. Against his father's wishes, Davis travels to rural, upstate New York to meet his other cousins.

While wrestling with a taboo attraction to one another, he and Alexis attempt to reunite their families, uncovering the reasons behind a long-standing rift and the shocking secret that tore their fathers apart. Together, their discoveries force them to confront the temptation to keep their familial grudge going rather than end it.

The film screens in English. Visit steamboatlibrary.org/events for more information.

Flu shot clinic to be offered to local veterans Oct. 7

Flu shots will be offered to Routt County veterans from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 7 at the Steamboat Springs Community Center, 1605 Lincoln Ave.

To qualify, veterans should bring proof of military service or an American Legion or VFW membership card.  Those serving in the Reserves or National Guard also are eligible if their units were deployed to a war zone during a military conflict. 

Veterans also sign up for VA Healthcare or get more information about it during the flu clinic. The VA health care program meets the requirements of the Affordable Care Act, so veterans who are enrolled meet health care law coverage standards. 

No appointment is necessary. Call Routt County Veterans Services Officer Natalie Breitung at 970-870-5469 for more information.

Tickets on sale for Hayden museum fundraiser

The Hayden Heritage Center and the Hayden High School theatre and creative writing programs will present "Echoes of the Past: A Lantern Tour of the Hayden Cemetery" on Oct 15.

There will be two tours at 7 and 8 p.m., which include a chili dinner at the Haven Community Center from 6 to 8:30 p.m., a wagon ride up to the cemetery where participants will meet some of the area's former residents and a wagon ride back to the center to warm up with hot beverages and a dessert bar.

Bring your own flashlight or purchase an LED lantern the night of the tour. Dress for the weather and walking on uneven paths.

Tickets are $25 for adults and $18 for children 12 and older, who must be accompanied by a ticketed adult. Tickets are available online at heritagecenter.org or can be purchased the night of the event.

Doors open at 6 pm. Tours are limited to 30 seats and not recommended for children younger than 12.

Parkinson's exercise class offered twice weekly

Parkinson's exercise classes are held at 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays and 9 a.m. Fridays at the United Methodist Church of Steamboat Springs, on Eighth and Oak streets. The class consists of exercises developed by neuroscientist Becky Farley (pwr4life.org) and Gary Sobol, who has Parkinson's and is the founder of GZ Sobol's Parkinson's Network (parkinsonsnetwork.org) to specifically address Parkinson's symptoms, including dexterity, rigidity, balance, bradykinesia and voice softness.

Class participants warm up their muscles, focus on big, powerful movements and loud voices and work together as a group to encourage one another, share tips and revel in good humor.

Classes are free. For more information, call Jacqueline Teuscher at 303-829-2869 or Eva Gibbons at 970-846-9887 or email jacqueline.teuscher@gmail.com.