Looking back: New breathtaking events at night show | SteamboatToday.com

Looking back: New breathtaking events at night show

From the Thursday, Feb. 13, 1958, edition of The Steamboat Pilot:

Providing one spectacle after another Saturday, the famed night show awed hundreds of spectators gathered at the foot of Howelsen Hill.

With a blaze of fireworks lighting the night sky, skiers formed a torchlight “S” at the top of the hill. Then, with only hand torches to light their way, skiers zoomed down the Graham jump and through a fiery hoop. As if this feat weren’t breathtaking enough, Ralph Selch’s crew performed for the first time a routine dubbed the “Midnight Schussnig,” a series of torch-carrying men descending slowly on skis from the very top of the hill, then “letting go” because below the “A” jump.

One of the highly anticipated events, Claudius Banks, “the Lighted Man,” from Vernal, Utah, thrilled spectators as he has in past years coursing down the slalom run lighted from head to toe and with Roman Candles bursting from his cap.

Following this event came the Roman Candle snake dance, performed by grade-school skiers. Then the major event of the evening – the impressive descent from the top of the hill by Carnival Queen Carol Sue Stehley and her colorful court attendants. Officially crowned by Eve Chesney, Carol Sue gracefully accepted her coveted role.

Shortly after the conclusion of the night show, a colorful dance was held in the community hall.

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Street events spectacular, brought many close races

Cheering, applauding and hugely enjoying themselves, enthusiastic crowds Saturday and Sunday witnessed an amazingly varied program of street events.

Straining to the limit, horses and riders pounded down Lincoln Avenue in the thrilling skijoring events. Youngsters with outsize goggles gave their all in the toddler ski race. And, of course, there was the much anticipated appearance of the high school ski band. Band innovations this year were the ingenious square dance and calypso routines.

High school survey gives student ideas on courses

The high school student in Steamboat Springs is quite definite in his views as to the place of science in the schools and, generally, on the whole question of education itself.

In a Pilot survey of 169 high school students, 106 students expressed a desire for more science courses, with 61 were satisfied with what is currently offered. The students were also quite emphatic in wanting more advanced-type courses. Boys were interested particularly in physics and math. The girls were inclined strongly toward advanced biology.

When asked if they thought the Russian student was smarter or more serious, Steamboat students gave a decided nod to their Soviet counterparts and dubbed them “more serious.” They did not feel, however, that we should make a “hero” out of the top U.S. student.

Our local youths were also quite frank on the question of their study habits. Only 11 out of the 169 students surveyed maintained that they studied hard enough on their courses. When asked if their teachers did all they could to help them learn, 103 of the students were completely satisfied on this score, 42 students answered “no,” while the remainder hedged or did not answer this question.