Health briefs: Yellow fever vaccine shortage reported | SteamboatToday.com

Health briefs: Yellow fever vaccine shortage reported

Yellow fever vaccine in short supply

The yellow fever vaccine, recommended or required for travel to some international destinations, is in short supply. Anyone planning travel to a yellow fever risk area is advised to contact the Northwest Colorado Visiting Nurse Association's travel clinic to verify the vaccine is available. If possible, travelers should do this at least one month prior to departure. Call the VNA's travel clinic at 970-871-7336. A list of all Colorado clinics providing the yellow fever vaccine is available at colorado.gov/cdphe/international-travel.

Crisis support lines available

A variety of crisis support lines are available 24 hours a day to connect local residents dealing with a personal mental health or other type of crisis with trained professionals or volunteers who can provide support. In the event of an emergency, dial 911.

• Reaching Everyone Preventing Suicide (REPS) 24-hour crisis line: 970-846-8182

• Advocates Building Peaceful Communities 24-hour crisis line: 970-879-8888

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• Mind Springs Health 24-hour crisis line: 1-888-207-4004

• Colorado's mental health crisis line: 1-844-493-TALK (8255)

Precautions advises when handling live poultry

Individuals are advised to take precautions when handling chicks, ducklings, goslings and baby turkeys due to the possibility of salmonella infection. Salmonella can result from handling live poultry, poultry cages and bedding. Children are more susceptible to the illness; children five and younger should not handle young birds. Individuals who have touched live poultry or areas where the birds live and roam should thoroughly wash hands with soap and water and clean any equipment or materials involved in raising or caring for poultry, such as feed and water containers. Never bring live poultry inside the house. For more information, call the Northwest Colorado Visiting Nurse Association at 970-879-1632.

Take precautions to avoid foodborne illness

Each year, one in six Americans are sickened from consuming foods or beverages contaminated with disease-causing microbes or pathogens. The Northwest Colorado Visiting Nurse Association recommends the following precautions to reduce the risk of foodborne illness.

• Always wash hands with soap and water before preparing food.

• Cook meat, poultry and eggs thoroughly. Use a food thermometer to measure internal temperature of meat.

• Wash hands, utensils and cutting boards after they have been in contact with raw meat or poultry and before they touch another food.

• Refrigerate leftovers that won't be eaten within four hours. Bacteria can grow quickly at room temperature.

• Wash produce in running tap water. Remove outermost leaves of a lettuce or cabbage. Bacteria can grow well on the cut surface of a fruit or vegetable. Take care not to contaminate produce while slicing on a cutting board, and don't leave cut produce out for extended periods.

• Keep food away from flies and insects.

Common symptoms of foodborne illness include vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever and chills. Those experiencing these symptoms should avoid preparing food for others. Pregnant women, the elderly and those with weakened immune systems are at higher risk for severe infections and should not consume undercooked animal products. Contact a healthcare provider if foodborne illness is suspected. For more information, visit cdc.gov/foodsafety/facts.

Send health briefs to tristow@steamboattoday.com.