Election Guide 2016: Darryl Glenn Q&A | SteamboatToday.com

Election Guide 2016: Darryl Glenn Q&A







Bio: Darryl Glenn is the leader the people of Colorado need in the United States Senate. As a civil servant dedicated to improving the lives and communities of those he has served, Darryl will continue to be a strong advocate fighting for the principles most important to Coloradans.

Q. Do you think the Senate should have held confirmation hearings on Judge Merrick Garland, President Obama's Supreme Court appointee? If elected, would you be willing to give all Supreme Court appointees timely hearings and an up or down vote?

A. Senate Republicans are right to postpone any confirmation on Supreme Court appointees until after the November election. The lifetime appointment of a justice that has the potential to sway the highest court in our nation in one direction or another is too vital to allow a lame duck president to slip through. The system of checks and balances breaks down when a justice is appointed by a chief executive with nothing left to lose, and we've seen that with the appointment of this liberal jurist.

Q. Evidence continues to mount that human activities are contributing to climate change. What, if anything, do you think could be done at the federal level to combat this problem while respecting the economic interests of business and industry?

A. While there is no doubt that climate change is occurring, I do not believe we should put our economy in peril or jeopardize the economic interests of business or industry by implementing unproven federal mandates to try and address the issue.

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Q. The economies of many Colorado regions are dependent upon coal production, an industry that has fallen under fire in recent years. What is your stance on the EPA's Clean Power Plan?

A. The disastrous and overreaching nature of the EPA's Clean Power Plan is evident by the court battles that have ensued. The massive scope of this plan, created by unelected Washington bureaucrats, would decimate the energy sector, push out manufacturing jobs from the country and cost the taxpayers a fortune, all while having only a marginal impact on the environment. This plan cannot go into effect, and I will oppose it wholeheartedly once in the Senate.

Q. What is your stance on the immigration issue? Would you support mass deportations, as have been suggested by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, or would you favor creating a path to citizenship for law-abiding, undocumented aliens living in the U.S.?

A. Any conversation about immigration reform must start with securing the border. The first duty of government is national security, and you cannot have national security until you know who is coming into and out of your country. We must secure the border and enforce existing laws that govern our immigration policy. But the work does not stop there: our legal immigration system is broken. We have thousands of people around the world who have been patiently waiting for years to enter this country- those that would be exemplary citizens. I fully support a policy of legal immigration that brings to our nation those that will enrich the fabric of our country while respecting the rule of law.

Q. Medicare spending is projected to nearly double by the year 2025, and while Social Security remains solvent for now, projections indicate the trust fund will be exhausted by 2033. What, in your opinion, is the best strategy for bolstering these programs for future generations?

A. Social Security is an earned benefit, and we must honor our commitment to those individuals with vested benefits. However, without tackling entitlement reform, there is no way to achieve a balanced budget or a healthy national economy in future generations. By all projections, if there is no change to our entitlement programs, in just a decade's time, they will account for over 10 percent of GDP. We need to start thinking about changing these programs for future generations. Social Security, for example, should not be the only source of retirement income for those in the workforce today. Our nation's young people should think of Social Security as one leg of a stool with IRAs, 401ks and other retirement savings making up additional portions of their retirement plans. Medicare, on the other hand, has benefitted from increased competition in the marketplace and has seen improvements and government savings via Medicare Advantage. To bolster this program in the future, our nation should continue to look to the free market.