james Patterson

james Patterson 3 weeks, 5 days ago on U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet: Making air travel more family friendly

I would challenge the concept of a free market when it comes to services/goods that are required for life. Food, health care, energy, educaton, wages, clean environment. These markets aren't "free" because those needing the services/goods really don't have a viable option. Let's call it the captive audience syndrome instead of monopoly. Free markets have no conscience. No care for consequences, intended or otherwise, that they can't be held legally liable for. They are concerned with demand, supply and profit. Not a real good basis for forming a viable country/world, especially when the demand is often created to meet a supply. I guess I started this to point that our present economic modal does not work and we need to look at other options and not get hung up on old divisions and labels. Profit is important, but there are other priorities that must come before it. I think Colorado is leading the way in this new paradigm. First on the MJ issue and soon in the Health Care arena. With the wealth of the world today and the ability to transport goods/services around the world, there is no reason for the suffering we see, whether in the US or any other place. There is enough……...

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james Patterson 3 weeks, 5 days ago on U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet: Making air travel more family friendly

So what you're saying is the free market capitalism modal does not apply to airports…….or railroads…….or?? for some strange reason but applies as the best possible economic modal for things such as health care services, food production/distribution, energy distribution, and establishment of wages? Just asking.

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james Patterson 3 weeks, 6 days ago on U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet: Making air travel more family friendly

And this fits into the small government, free market, capitalism rationale how? Of course these are just 2 examples of how "business" charges taxpayers to increase their profits. I'm not saying it is necessarily bad or good, just seems inconsistent. In fact, doesn't it reek of democratic socialism?

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james Patterson 3 weeks, 6 days ago on U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet: Making air travel more family friendly

I'm not real smart and definitely not schooled in the world of business and finance. That being said, I've always wondered why the government at any level is involved in building airports, providing air traffic control or any other aspect of a private business. Seems to me airlines should be accountable for all aspects of air travel and charge accordingly-you know-that free market thing. According to a lot of folks, they (private business) could do it better because the government can't do anything better than private business. The same goes for pro sports stadiums. Why are they built with tax monies? The answer may be obvious and I may simply be showing my ignorance, but would someone pls let me in on the "secret".

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james Patterson 1 month ago on City Council to make final decision on pot shop move Tuesday

Their opinion should matter only if the business has a demonstrable negative impact on the adjacent business and violates zoning laws. A pot shop has no odor, no overt advertising or any other aspect that would impact an adjacent business. Considering it's next to a "family burger business" that lines it's aisles with cases of beer, hard ale, etc and has a full bar in the view of any customer entering, I would call the whole thing a wash and let the pot shop survive (or not) on it's own merits. You know, that capitalism thing.

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james Patterson 1 month ago on City Council to make final decision on pot shop move Tuesday

You are entitled to you opinion and have stated it here to be read by all. I also suspect you voted and stated your opinion there, possibly multiple times. The issue therefore seems to be that your opinion is not being turned into policy as it happens to be in the minority. Isn't America great that one can express a minority opinion and not be persecuted for it? To top it all off, we get to see capitalism at it's best. A whole new industry has been created and the capitalist are having a field day and making enourmous profits. Sounds like a libertarian's dream. That is unless you are part of the new minority in America that feel their will should win out regardless of the majority opinion. Kinda like what's going on in the House of late.

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james Patterson 1 month, 3 weeks ago on Enterprise zone tax credits help free Steamboat's Chief Theater of unwanted pole

Smaller government, more liberty, more freedom, free markets, let the people have a voice, less regulation cries the conservative…..until I don't like what you are doing. Interesting.

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james Patterson 1 month, 3 weeks ago on New CMC fund aims to improve college readiness, offer scholarships

I agree the book topic is irrelevant. Scott, why "force" a student/teacher to find some modern day relevancy in a book simply because it's considered a classic. Why not find a modern book the speaks to the student thus encouraging them to find relevance. Apply this to any subject. Find what makes this skill relevant to the student. Ken, I'm not sure what your exposure is to education in America, but not even most HS in America offer a relevant curriculum to it's non-college bound students. That fact is what kept me in business for 30+ yrs and continues to keep my colleagues going. If you think every (most, some) student in America has the opportunites offered at SBHS you live in a very different world than I do. Those lucky enough to attend SBHS have the best available. (and the results show) They are not the norm. If material presented is so alien to a student that they can't relate, nothing will be learned.
I think I agree with you on the educational system. It is becoming irrelevant to learning. So much is available that is not in a brick building or dictated by school boards that don't have a clue about their students needs and oftentimes, the needs of industry. The specific skills you obtained/needed are becoming obsolete. That being said, today's youth have skills by the time they reach HS that I can't even imagine. The way they think, solve problems and communicate with each other is amazing. It's not how far they have fallen, but how fast they are rising. Our ed methods need to adapt to this, especially for our less fortunate youth.

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james Patterson 1 month, 3 weeks ago on New CMC fund aims to improve college readiness, offer scholarships

Your example of what could substitute for "Catcher…" simply illustrates my point. Not one title that most of today's youth could identify with and/or apply to their life. There are many, many examples of literature that could point out the same life's lessons that would make much more sense to today's youth. Why must "basic education" be something that folks may have related to 50 yrs ago (or more-I sure didn't relate to it, enjoy it, etc and I read Odyssey/Illiad in Latin Nothing sort of torture) Applying the finding of X to the physics of a 500 hp engine(or some such thing) instead of scratches on a piece of paper would make more sense to a lot of todays youth. We don't disagree on what so much as how. There are many ways to achieve "literacy and basic ed". I must say I never met a "blue collar" that told me how much they loved Shakespere or algebra, but I have met many that were grateful for learning how to break down an engine or blue print a building. I had what you call a "basic ed" and by far most of it was a waste of time unless I want to "impress" folks at a cocktail party or win Trivia at the Tap House. Again, the ability to analyze, critique and discuss written, verbal, etc are critical, but you don't get there with a vast number of youth teaching any of the "classics" you mention. If they don't relate to the material, nothing is learned. Grad rates tell us that what we as a society are doing isn't working. What is elitism about your approach is that you see the only way to gain those basic ed skills is through the curriculum you experienced, not what would be in the studen's experience. Altho it obviusly worked for you, it is not working for the majority of America's youth.

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james Patterson 1 month, 3 weeks ago on New CMC fund aims to improve college readiness, offer scholarships

Again, we will have to agree to disagree. Giving import to "Catcher in the Rye" is a very narrow vision of an "education". This is one of the reasons why so many students fail to identfy and participate with their education and feel like they are being force fed instead of being allowed to explore and learn. To all but a relatively small section of our population, "Catcher.." has absolutely no meaning in their life and adds no meaning if they read it. Totally different worlds. There are examples of literature from their world that would include them instead of illustrating how "outside" they really are. Imagine being anything but white, upper middle class, American and reading "Catcher…..". It would be a "what the … this ain't my world" moment.
I've met many, many kids through the years and rarely, if ever, met a lazy one. Alienated, yes. Disillusioned, yes. Hopeless, yes. Wanting to succeed, yes. Wanting an opportunity, yes. Wanting understanding, yes. Fitting into what appears to be your world, not so much. There are many, many Americas. All of them with their beauty and ugliness. All of them America. To define preparation in such a narrow way excludes a major part of our youth. Thanx for the civil discourse. It's appreciated.

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