Scott Ford

Born in Denver

Scott Ford 2 weeks, 2 days ago on Steamboat Summer Concert Series announced

Hi Steve – I appreciate you making it clear that the use of the “Free” implies no cost. The Summer Concert Series cost money. The City’s share of the cost for the 2014 series is $23,000. The Arts & Culture Collation requested $30,000 for the concert series from the City.

I appreciate your request for some data. Although far from perfect, we know some about the Summer Concert Series. Based on the Steamboat Springs Chamber Resort Association summer research we know that about 60% of the summer visitor while they were in town attended at least one or more organized activities that could be classified as a “Special Event” during their stay. These events range from the National Cattle Dog Trials to the Steamboat All Arts Festival.

Of the 60% of the visitors that attended an event during their stay 82% indicated that they went to a Summer Concert Series if that concert happened to coincide when they were in town anyway. From our visitors’ perspective the Summer Concert Series was yet another fun thing to do (amongst a long list of fun things to do) while they were in town.

Based on 2013 summer visitor expenditure data to recover the City’s share the Summer Concert Series would need to motivate about 1,700 folks to come to Steamboat Springs specifically for the Summer Concert Series and stay in paid lodging. From my perspective that would be a wee-bit of an optimistic stretch.

The research does seem to indicate that for a returning summer visitor that they will often choose the time they plan to be in Steamboat Springs – based on when an event is happening. Is it possible that some repeat visitors plan their stay around the Summer Concert Series? It is likely that some do.

To put it simply, the Summer Concert Series is essentially a party we throw for ourselves that visitors are welcome to join us. Hopefully a good time is had by all.

(Although I am a member of City Council – my opinions are my own and may or may not reflect the opinions of my fellow City Council members.)

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Scott Ford 1 month ago on Steamboat City Council clears way to lift deed restrictions at Sunray Meadows

Scott W – You nailed it! –Smaller homes on small lots. (This comes down to zoning.) The link below is to a development in Breckenridge I believe you and I have discussed before.
http://www.poplarhouse.com/index.php This is The Wellington Neighborhood in Breckenridge. These are single family homes ranging in size from 1,250 to 1,995. Homes typically face a central common area and many have a front porch. It was built on the remains of an old gold dredging operation. A contractor from the front-range essentially had set floor plans and a majority of the home was built in sections I think in Brighton and the pieces of the home were assembled at the construction site. I think they have well over 100 homes on small lots that are .15 acre. The homes sell in the low $300K range.
I am not saying that something of the same scale is necessary – but something involving small homes on small lots works and this is an example.

(Although I am a member of City Council, I want to stress that the views expressed in this posting are my own and may or may not be shared by other members of City Council or staff.)

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Scott Ford 1 month ago on Steamboat City Council clears way to lift deed restrictions at Sunray Meadows

Hi Fred – I am glad you have a long memory!

One of the biggest challenges is that if those who forget or ignore history are doomed to repeat it. We are just a little over a year away before the suspension of the “affordable housing” requirements are re-instated. During the summer sometime the City Planning Department is going to hold a series of forums to discuss the housing issues in Steamboat Springs. COME!!!

I am a data guy and I could not get anyone to define for me what the scope of the problem was, other than it is expensive to live here – and the number of households that were spending 35% on housing expense. The percentage a household spends on housing maybe a problem but I am n not too sure it is a problem local government is any good at fixing. Believe me we tried!

The outcomes or the attempts includes inclusionary zoning – payment in-lieu and deed restrictions. All sounded like good ideas to some and totally goofy to others at the time. Adventures like the Iron Horse should serve as a reminder as a community we are capable of doing some goofy things.

Local Government does play a role in the housing policy of a community. The role it plays is in the area of zoning/land use. Although messy market forces are likely the best strategy for working this out. Without question there will be winners and losers.

(Although I am a member of City Council, I want to stress that the views expressed in this posting are my own and may or may not be shared by other members of City Council or staff.)

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Scott Ford 1 month ago on Goal setting a work in progress for Steamboat City Council

Hi Scott W – You are absolutely right! It is my understanding there is nothing stopping us from having work sessions as often and on any subject as we wish. It simply takes planning and some coordination. The practical value of a work session occurs when staff has the opportunity to prepare and when the greatest number of Council Members can attend. I am working toward the goal of having City Council Work Sessions that are productive. All of this may not happen as fast as you would like – but we will get there – that I am “optimistic” of.

(Although I am a member of City Council, I want to stress that the views expressed in this posting are my own and may or may not be shared by other members of City Council or staff.)

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Scott Ford 1 month ago on Goal setting a work in progress for Steamboat City Council

Good Morning Thomas – In this context the quote from Scott Myller, lifted by the paper, ties back that during regularly scheduled City Council meetings the ‘rules of order’ City Council operates under is not conducive to an active free flowing give-n-take between council members and/or the public/staff. (This formality is something I am still getting used to.)

In the past City Council had scheduled Work Session. Currently the Planning Commission has monthly Work Sessions where a topic is discussed in greater depth and there is opportunity for staff/public/planning commissioners to have an informal exchange with each other.
The benefit of a Work Session is that information is exchanged, questions clarified, opinions expressed and greater learning about an issue takes place. A Work Session is not bound by the formality associated with a regularly scheduled meeting. As a follow up to a Work Session often staff is given direction to get more information and/or return with a “motion” to be considered at a future regularly scheduled meeting.

I appreciate the sentiment Scott Myller expressed. Learning about things of ‘public interest’, in the paper before they have been “deliberated” by City Council is a goofy. I am optimistic City Council will return to the practice of using Work Sessions. (Although I am a member of City Council, I want to stress that the views expressed in this posting are my own and may or may not be shared by other members of City Council or staff.)

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Scott Ford 1 month, 1 week ago on Some Steamboat City Council members question recent use of confidential memos from city staff

This is not the first time City Council has addressed the issue associated with marking communications to City Council as Work Product. Former City Council member Cari Hermacinski, characterized the use of Work Product as, “far more insidious than the use of executive session.”
Although this statement has been said in many different ways by many different people it still applies, “Those that forget the past or simply ignore it, are doomed to repeat it.” Prior City Councils have made a commitment to transparency. This commitment must go beyond a simple agreement that it is a good idea – the actions of City Council and that of City staff must demonstrate and serve as evidence to that commitment. I simply do not care what transparency and open government (or lack of) practices are followed in other towns/cities. This is our town. For those that are interested to see what took place in the past one can view the City Council video from the 12/4/2012 where a commitment to open and transparency government was made. The portion of interest starts at 1:27:30 to 1:47:00.
http://docs.steamboatsprings.net/sirepub/meetresults.aspx?view=&supertype=&startdate=12/4/2012&enddate=12/4/2012&MeetType=Regular%20Meeting As one can clearly see in the video a commitment was made that communication marked Work Product would not be released by staff without first having it reviewed by the City Attorney agreed that it was appropriated to be marked as such. In the two items referenced in my council report this did not happen or it was very “muddy”.
This is an accountability issue. Folks in this City government (elected or hired) must do what they say they are going to do. This does not seem unreasonable to me. (Although I am a member of City Council, I want to stress that the views expressed in this posting are my own and may or may not be shared by other members of City Council or staff.)

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Scott Ford 1 month, 3 weeks ago on Our View: Preserving Steamboat’s unique brand

Editorial Board – Thank you for your perspecte. Over the weekend I had the chance to dig deeply into the Chamber’s market research. Observations in that research is that about 65% of folks visiting Steamboat Springs over the summer did not necessarily come to town specifically for a “special event”. They simply came to enjoy Steamboat Springs and the wide variety of activities available. However, while they were already in town they went to a “special event” that was taking place. Of those indicating they went to a special event the Steamboat Pro Rodeo Series was the special event most often mentioned. To be sure the Pro Rodeo Series spans several weeks and therefore offers more opportunity to attend than a single weekend event such as the Hot Air Balloon Rodeo and Art in the Park.

Simply put, the Pro Rodeo is a special event in our portfolio that says Steamboat Springs and western heritage loud and clear like few things can. Most likely our visitors made the decision to attend the rodeo because of its wide appeal to everyone in the visiting party and its affordability. Simply put, the rodeo is a unique package of fun for families, couples, empty nesters, etc.

(In this context I am speaking as Scott Ford citizen of Steamboat Springs. Although I am a member of City Council, the views and opinions I expressed are only my own and may not represent those of the City Council as a whole.)

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Scott Ford 2 months, 4 weeks ago on Barn fire in Bailey puts Comcast Internet out in Steamboat

Hi Scott – Your point is well taken. Thankfully yesterday there were options; however, I too was significantly “handcuffed” with Comcast’s service outage yesterday. They can do better and I hope to learn more about why they are not.

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