Roy Powell

Roy Powell 2 months, 1 week ago on After controversial executive session, City Council endorses short sale of former city manager's home

The City will never see a dime of the money. Give the guy (Lanning) a 1099 for the difference and be done with it. The council members who struck this original deal should be identified. The original deal and making such self serving deals, that exclusively benefit elite staff and elected officials, should not happen in that they do not serve the public interest.

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Roy Powell 2 months, 1 week ago on After controversial executive session, City Council endorses short sale of former city manager's home

The City will never see a dime of the money. Give the guy (Lanning) a 1099 for the difference and be done with it. The council members who struck this original deal should be identified. This type of deal making does not serve the public interest.

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Roy Powell 7 months, 2 weeks ago on Routt County Commissioners hand off puzzle of nightly rentals to planning board

What a convoluted mess. There currently is an avenue via special/conditional use permit for AF zoned properties (and others) to apply for nightly rentals, and many do it! Please don't confuse the issue. We are talking about residential neighborhoods and ares with families and children that are often run by volunteer Home Owners Associations far from code enforsement capabilities, that have little ability to handle road maintenance, let alone recreational nightly rental services. In a County where all commercial activity is regulated through the permit process, how can anyone view residential nightly rentals as a normal use by right? The County is not the City. Regulating the number of days is not going to address the compatibility issue. Nor will it address the added emergency services requirements associated with nightly renters. The very character of our County is at risk here. Is there a way through this issue? I say yes, but only with an acceptance that this is a huge, complex issue with many pitfalls and likely unforeseen hazards. It appears to me that there are some extreemenly naive points of view being bantered around about concerning the health, safety and welfare of our rural homes. I can only hope that cooler minds will prevail!

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Roy Powell 8 months, 2 weeks ago on Routt County work sessions explore solution to neighbor conflicts over short-term rentals

Mr. Scott, The current regulation provides for approval of nightly rentals in the County via a Special Use Permit for zoning qualified properties.. Otherwise the regulation is that it is a zoning or use violation to provide nightly rentals without a Special Use Permit. Without regulation the health and safety of your family is at risk. Living next to a home recently purchased by a non-resident, and purchased as an investment out of foreclosure, the new owners started to rent the home nightly. Cha-ching $$$ ! The ATVs at 50 MPH, the late night parties, the unattended blazing fires and public debauchery are freighting to me and my family. If this is a "needed service" then I am missing something. The County is proposing to legalize an activity and use in the county that is being abused. Their solution to their in-ability or lack of desire to enforce the current regulation is to legalize it with expanded regulation. I will not accept any expansion of this current non-conforming use and turn the County and rural residences into commercial casinos of vacationing revelers who have little regard for the family value oriented residential communities they exist in. The City of Steamboat Springs has approval of nightly rentals of homes with regulation AND adequate nearby support and emergency services. The County does not. Rent your vacation home in the City or in the County only where the property has been adequately vetted for compliance and safety with a Special Use Permit.

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Roy Powell 8 months, 2 weeks ago on Letter to the editor: Writer wants opinions

(The below statement was written to the Steamboat Pilot's 9/13/2015 editorial, which is in support of legalizing nightly rentals in the rural county called "The Sharing Economy.")

I cannot disagree more. (with the editorial) The County is not like the City in regulating and enforcing nightly rentals. The County has only two commercially zoned properties -- only two! Not currently an organization with a high degree of experience in regulating this activity. The special use permit process works well, however limited as it may be. It works well because it accounts for compatibility of the use relative to the property/neighborhood. Turing the entire County into a short term rental enterprise zone so as to better regulate an issue is overkill. I don't believe that the economic impact of such a move can be adequately understood either. The dramatic changes proposed here to family rural neighborhoods would include crime, density, property values, law enforcement, drunk driving and fire danger. It is not fair to criticize the character of nightly rental clients, however it is fair to say that their use and respect for property, the community and the environment is different and often incompatible with existing laws, neighborhood HOA rules and a single family home owners quiet enjoyment of their property. This cannot be regulated by "robust” rules and regulation but must involve a dramatic and expansive change in code and law enforcement. That's reality! I have dealt with the realities of illegal nightly rentals in our neighborhood. It is frightening! I cannot support a program that dramatically reduces my safely, quality of life and peace of mind in order to satisfy a county official's need to increase county regulation, staffing and law enforcement.

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Roy Powell 8 months, 2 weeks ago on Our view: Welcome to the 'Sharing Economy'

I cannot disagree more. The County is not like the City in regulating and enforcing nightly rentals. The County has only two commercially zoned properties -- only two! Not currently an organization with a high degree of experience in regulating this activity. The special use permit process works well, however limited as it may be. It works well because it accounts for compatibility of the use relative to the property/neighborhood. Turing the entire County into a short term rental enterprise zone so as to better regulate an issue is overkill. I don't believe that the economic impact of such a move can be adequately understood either. The dramatic changes proposed here to family rural neighborhoods would include crime, density, property values, law enforcement, drunk driving and fire danger. It is not fair to criticize the character of nightly rental clients, however it is fair to say that their use and respect for property, the community and the environment is different and often incompatible with existing laws, neighborhood HOA rules and a single family home owners quiet enjoyment of their property. This cannot be regulated by "robust” rules and regulation but must involve a dramatic and expansive change in code and law enforcement. That's reality! I have dealt with the realities of illegal nightly rentals in our neighborhood. It is frightening! I cannot support a program that dramatically reduces my safely, quality of life and peace of mind in order to satisfy a county official's need to increase county regulation, staffing and law enforcement.

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Roy Powell 8 months, 2 weeks ago on Routt County commissioners insist on robust regulations before legalizing vacation home rentals

My new neighbors, who bought their bank owned property as an investment. has up graded the home with a wood burning stove and outside fire pit among other things. The wood-stove was not built with county inspection or approval. Shortly thereafter the nightly rentals started and so did all of the incompatable activities. ATVs and snowmobiles racing up and down the subdivision roads, parties past midnight, public urination and blazing unattended fires with kids throwing fire sticks in the yard. Luckily we have had low fire danger the past two years.

The incompatibility of nightly renters in rural sudivisions is an impossible dynamic. The county thinks they have a problem currently with enforcement, good luck with more unenforceable regulation. Strangers in a family neighborhood 20-30 miles from law enforcement is is asking for trouble. Introducing out of state hunters with guns, ATVs, alcohol and attitude into rural family neighborhoods is a dangerous combination.

Most rural subdivisions have Home Owner Association covenants that prohibit nightly rentals anyway, but they are ill-equipped to deal with it. With a new county approval, what chance does a volunteer HOA have of proper enforcement? -- None!

Having nightly rental regulation in the county is currently done via a Special Use Permit for properties that are compatible with this use. The City program also works because it can be managed within the municipality.

You want expand on this program because why ? -- you want to further challange law enforcement, you want to increase the fire danger, you want to undermine the rural neighborhoods? Is there a nightly rental shortage? Is it the money? I doubt much sales tax is currently collected from rogue operators. I think it is a fantasy that you think will help this situation by expanding nightly rentals in the county. The county currently has a grand total of two commercially zoned properties. Clearly this is not an organization to blithely venture into the dangers posed to rural communities, regulators and law enforcement. What are you thinking?

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Roy Powell 2 years, 6 months ago on Rob Perlman: Winter air program news

The basic principal of an effective air program is to consider the best hub airlines/cities where connections from large geographic areas can be created. Related to this is promoting Steamboat to people who ski/board. This was done to better effect in the genesis of our program. Now due to convoluted airline realities, the best negotiated price does not always yield the most skiers/boarders, therefore lots of empty seats. The west coast program with Alaska Airlines, which is weak in connector flights, and L.A., which is weak in skier/boarder populations are examples of this dynamic. The largest population of skiers/boarders in California are in Northern California where Steamboat is one of the most popular destination resorts – but no flights! Another challanged market is upstate New York where promotions and connection packages are inconsistant. These areas are chuck full of enthusiastic, dedicated skiers/boarders who have sub-par skiing/boarding options at home and would love to taste our champagne powder, if they only could.

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Roy Powell 4 years, 3 months ago on rpowell

While it is reasonable to consider a “safer” chip and seal application for bicyclists riding our county roads, it is unreasonable not to take into account the safety of ALL users of these roads. The recreational use of our paved county roads for bicyclists is effectively being promoted by this decision. Agree or disagree, this is a sign of the times and a byproduct of our resort economy. In light of the summer marketing plans for major biking events in Steamboat, this decision is consistent with economic development objectives as well. This is a good!

However look at the most popular roads for bicyclists in the County. For example Elk River Road (RCR 129) is one of the most popular. While always a popular bike ride, Elk River Road is not well suited for the variety of demands being placed on it. It is essentially designed as a rural ranching road that is narrow, undulating, curvy and shoulder-less in places. It is access to one of the most popular Colorado State Parks, Steamboat Lake, which draws hundreds of thousands of campers caravaning up and down the road in spring, summer and fall. It is also a popular winter destination for Nordic skiing and snowmobile commuters. Don’t forget that sightseeing is compelling on this stretch and our wildlife friends use it all the time.

Given the growth of the commuting local population in North Routt, a new school, together with the ongoing ranching activities, the Elk River Road has increasing and conflicting uses. Making the surface of the road more popular for bicycles may have harmful side effects unless the overall safety of the road is addressed. Surface quality aside, the width of the road is, in places, dangerous where there are narrow side shoulders or no shoulders at all! The shoulders, where existent, are gravel, which can be dangerous for bicyclists to navigate. There are very few places to pull off the road safely, there are steep drainages without guardrails and there are no passing lanes. Also consider RCR 14, another popular ride for bicyclists, essentially it has the very same issues.

This chip & seal decision does not go far enough and does not take into account the overall quality of some of the roads that are most impacted. Consideration is needed for increased safety for the width and shoulders, guardrails and passing lanes and safe rest areas to pull off these roads. We should also consider expanding the number of paved roads in the county to diffuse concentrated bicycle use on heavy traffic roads. For example, RCR 44 comes to mind. If we are going to promote recreational biking on our paved county roads then we must take into account the overall safely needs with this expanded use.

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