John Weibel

John Weibel 4 weeks ago on New plan could simplify the Routt County permit process for those seeking to grow and sell food locally

The whole permitting process is a part of the problem and rules governing external costs of what is done on ones property should be regulated/reviewed. Not wether one can or can not do something on their land without seeking the governments approval. Adding value to an ag product (separating the wheat from the chaff, utilizing some process to make ones ag product storable for later sale as the climate here is difficult), renting a home on a nightly basis, logging (as long as it is not wholesale clear cutting of a property) or anything of a non-commercial/industrial (a retail store, lots of people coming and going) the scale of an operation, should be allowed.

Other than complying with rules and regulations or protecting the environment and safety, the permitting of how one can use their private property as they see fit is simply adding taxes/costs. Allowing people to rent out homes on a nightly basis, raises property values, and also increases tax revenues. Being able to extract water from milk to make it shelf stable, should not require a planning department permit, though it should require the health departments oversight. Ones neighbors should not be able to determine how one uses their property, if it has little or no effect on them.

Then there are some rules which provide no actual benefit and those rules need some way of being reviewed in a professional manner. When a fire response is likely to take an hour, there is little use in a "fire wall" to protect the insurance company from a larger loss - so that a fire can be put out before it spreads. Evidence of the insurers belief that there is no need for a firewall in such a setting are disregarded.

In a rural setting, insurance premiums are higher as fire response times are longer, rarely will there ever be anything but a total loss of a structure in the event of a fire, wether there is a "fire wall" or not. Old structures rarely comply with current codes and the cost of bringing them up to code to be able to "process" ones agricultural product, as long as all health safety and reasonable real safety (Electrical, ensuring it appears structurally sound, etc.) issues are met, there is little sense in ensuring frost protection, insulation (most will be seasonally used and unheated), etc.. It seems that common sense does not get utilized in these situations.

Setting up the rules, enforcing them and getting out of the way seems to make more sense than requiring permitting of every activity that one wants to partake in and imposing rules that make it difficult to utilize old structures, even the ICC is reviewing that.

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John Weibel 1 month ago on Seasonal Steamboat Ski Area employees will no longer receive health insurance from Intrawest

If preventative health care is a key to keeping health care costs down, then actually getting to the root of the problem, nutritionally deficient foods would be the starting place.

Those nutritionally deficient foods are the result of the government intervening into the marketplace and subsidizing grain production. Food today has about half the nutritional value as it did 100 years ago. http://www.worldwatch.org/node/5339

People are sicker today then they used to be and the food that is providing them with sustenance is not as high of quality, partially from the processing to ensure safe foods- though that can be tested in a lab today in the case of milk. The other cause is the essential strip mining of fields when in continuous row cropping and sterilization of the soil with pesticides and herbicides killing the microbial life that helps get the nutrients into the plants.

So, the gubamint is part of the health care problem in trying to make food cheap for everyone… yet at what cost.

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John Weibel 1 month ago on Winter airline program projected to be $1 million under cap

Just like in Robin Hood, the tax man, the sheriff, imposed lots of taxes on the people and until Robin Hood stood up to the unjust taxation and returned it to taxpayers, the recipients of tax funds did well.

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John Weibel 1 month ago on Seasonal Steamboat Ski Area employees will no longer receive health insurance from Intrawest

Neil,

The underpinnings of a free market would be a currency which is not controlled by a private institution. As Thomas Jefferson is quoted "If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around them will deprive the people of all property until their children wake up homeless on the continent their Fathers conquered."

Toss in the distortion to the free market which guarantees pensions by the federal governments legislation, allowing so much investment, of peoples pensions, into corporations which really do not operate within a free market.

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John Weibel 1 month ago on Seasonal Steamboat Ski Area employees will no longer receive health insurance from Intrawest

Neil,

The underpinnings of a free market would be a currency which is not controlled by a private institution. As Thomas Jefferson is quoted "If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around them will deprive the people of all property until their children wake up homeless on the continent their Fathers conquered."

Toss in the distortion to the free market which guarantees pensions by the federal governments legislation, allowing so much investment, of peoples pensions, into corporations which really do not operate within a free market.

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John Weibel 1 month ago on Our View: Time’s a wastin’

Maybe the commissioners get a decent pay check for their time where as the city council does not and so they have to have other employment, taking away from time to spend at work sessions.

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John Weibel 1 month ago on Bill Wallace: Letter is clueless

Australia is repealing its carbon tax, causing China to reconsider it.

Simply a tax source to fund the UN and push government further from the people. Really it needs to be moved as close to the people as possible.

http://www.smh.com.au/business/carbon-economy/china-reconsiders-carbon-tax-citing-australias-planned-repeal-20140313-34nfp.html

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John Weibel 1 month, 1 week ago on Bill Wallace: Letter is clueless

Wow, just wow. It really is hard to have any dialogue in this world any longer. The PTB have done their job well and divided and conquered.

Too bad, though it probably does not matter any longer as it is the best democracy that money can buy. You go talk with the politicians and they say that is a good idea and hmm, yep we are taxing employers of employees to fund unemployment insurance. They ponder it think about the fact that the causes of unemployment are not taxed and then they just move on.

They wonder why so many are leaving rural America. I suggested at a USDA meeting outside of Denver, that opposed to giving payments to grow grain give kids who intern on farms a grant, in lieu of wages, to buy land to farm on in the future if they stay with it for 5 years. Guess the real reason they are worried about the loss of real rural population is lack of military personnel (https://www.facebook.com/Polyfacefarm/posts/10151509522441105).

My new favorite show is Farmed and Dangerous, with the quote "what people are eating is killing them as opposed to people starving, now that is progress".

Third world countries are banning the GMO products as well as the roundup, because of the disruption it causes to us people also. Seed sales people admit off the record that the old varieties grew more per acre than the new stuff. However, the new stuff gets royalties and as the Fentress' stated last fall the new variety of wheat can only be sold back to the originator of the seed. That right there is a tying contract and in violation of section 7 of the Clayton act, I believe, and should be gone after in a class action anti-trust suit, for any attorneys looking to take down a multinational. Some cell companies also violate the same clause in not allowing one to opt out of the data package with a smart phone, AT&T for me. I was going to persue both claims, but really am too tired to deal with all the legal BS that goes with it.

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