John Weibel

John Weibel 1 month, 3 weeks ago on Joe Meglen: Is Constitution relevant?

Chris,

While not Monday, I obtained my permit today. It was not like talking to a wall where I would think that I came up with a reasonable solution to the problem previously presented and then told that no really that is not the problem and this is it. I generally can deal with any situation, however, the moving target I appeared to be shooting at, brought me to the point of losing marbles.

Done reading and commenting on this forum for a while as I have oodles of work to complete in the next 20 days. Thankfully after presenting a video of trying to burn the product the consultant I am using, who is fitting me in with General Mills work and working with the FDA to design rules that work for the cheese "industry" (I am not part of an industry, just trying to make my ag product shelf stable) as there are many problems with the allowed rules and food safety.

Anyway, I am grateful, that for the next 20 days, I will be able to immerse myself in work to winterize my farm and get ready for next summer, so we are not waddling in mud as it was this spring and fall.

While the new head of the building department has been a breath of fresh air, the county still needs someone acting as a fiduciary to ensure that the county is not simply trying to have full employment. The "weed patrol" was out in force today and spraying the 2-4-d, I think, and most of it was not ending up somewhere positive and the work, essentially makes it difficult to certify my "farm" as organic, stealing my private property rights to save us from something that found a home and is extracting CO2 from the atmosphere.

Pax and adios until I take the winter off and hopefully ski many days a week.

Sorry for any grammatical errors as I have had a few libations.

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John Weibel 1 month, 3 weeks ago on Joe Meglen: Is Constitution relevant?

Chris,

By the way if you can not even get your local officials to see that an error may have been made. How does one ever hope to get the officials to realize that civil asset forfeiture is probably in direct conflict with the unreasonable search and seizure clause.

Also, how do you get rules at the federal level changed that seemingly do not actually improve the general welfare, except maybe the general welfare of the corporations who can not test their beeves for mad cow disease. The processor that spent a couple million to be able to test all their animals was told they could not by the USDA and yet it would have allowed them to export their product to Japan. It would have also set the bar too high for the corporate packers.

So I fail to see how both of those federal provisions are constitutional. Are we as citizens just to sit back at every level and take whatever the government officials throw at us? That was the point, I was trying to make via my own circumstances at the local level trying to get people to realize the rules were either wrong or interpreted incorrectly and should we just sit back and live with the rules as I think was suggested or do we stand up for what we believe is right?

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John Weibel 1 month, 3 weeks ago on Joe Meglen: Is Constitution relevant?

Chris,

I did not really want to or have the $20-30K to build a structurally unstable firewall. I also did not desire to provide engineering for the 80 year old barn that simply is attached to what I built and then deal with the can of worms in bringing it up to code.

Anyway, I now have the financial resources to continue and hopefully have a permit for a structure that a consultant agrees with and the building department will allow to be built, on Monday. Otherwise, I will finish my NEW construction (started 45 days ago), comply with the code and be ever vigilant for the mold that the Cheese consultant has stated will arise, if I need to put a drywall thermal barrier between the ICF and the wall panel that has no materials that will mold, but is fire resistant.

Anyway, in actually producing official plans, it really appears that the processing of ones agricultural product is considered an F2 use and should not have required any separation between a U use, excluding a wall. While I did seek advice as to weather I needed a permit before I initially started and was told no, I did not state as such, the second time I spoke with Carl, as I just wanted to get through whatever red tape that may have existed. Yet because it was perceived I was skirting the rules they punished me, especially after I questioned them based upon my belief that there was no need for a firewall - which there was not - just an abuse of power to put people in their place when they question rules they believe are wrong.

Tried to run for commissioner two years ago and I had not changed my address of record and so I was unable to challenge Monger. I will next cycle, I thought of a recall election, this cycle given the level of financial mismanagement I see.

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John Weibel 1 month, 3 weeks ago on Joe Meglen: Is Constitution relevant?

Chris,

 A question for you, what happens when one feels that the interpretation of the rules is done wrong, should they stand up and try to make change or simply sit back and follow the rules as interpreted by the non-elected officials?

 You have a set of building codes that are written to help provide guidance to ensure that things are done right.  What happens when you feel that those rules are being interpreted incorrectly, what recourse does one have. Not much in reality, unless one desires to waste lots of personal and county resources to fix how the rules are interpreted for future applications of the code.

  Should a greenhouse that hopefully never has much snow on it comply with engineering to ensure it can withstand the snow load?  Should someone be required to provide engineering to show that an 80 year old barn can handle the snow wind and seismic loads of the valley or build an elaborate separation, more than the health safety codes require, to process their agricultural products?  Especially when there are no significant fire risks.  Should one be required to cover foam insulated concrete walls with drywall, because a panel is not rated to act as thermal protection for the foam core.  yet in doing so we now have created potential food safety risks.

 Is it not our responsibility as citizens to stand up to what we see as being wrong or blindly follow the rules that exist.  It is my belief that we need some form of mechanism to allow even a single individual to bring up a potential problem and have it examined as to wether the rule works or does not.

 If our government is afraid of its citizens, as they have the ability to keep it in check, then you have liberty.  If the citizens are afraid of the government, then you have tyranny.  Trying to move all decision making back to as close to the people as possible makes the most sense.

 The civil asset forfeiture issues, militarizing of our police and free speech zones coupled with more show me that we need to stop moving toward a global government and return to a local government, where you can actually speak with you elected officials and present why something appears to be wrong and work towards a reasonable solution.

  It appears that our government does not believe that its citizens will try to be civilized and as such everything needs to be regulated, as opposed to enacting rules that work towards protecting others from being harmed from others actions.  Thus the government stepping in and requiring a permit for every possible activity one could participate in.
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John Weibel 1 month, 3 weeks ago on Joe Meglen: Is Constitution relevant?

Taking property without due process is wrong and goes against the spirit of the constitution.

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John Weibel 1 month, 3 weeks ago on Jeremy Johnston: Support Prop. 105

Mark

Some experimental treatments are un patentable. The pharmacueticals don't want competition, just like the big packers got the usda to make independent testing for mad cow illegal. No reason to not allow a packer to test their beeves for it except the large packers can't and so they would be at a competitive disadvantage.

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John Weibel 1 month, 3 weeks ago on Joe Meglen: Is Constitution relevant?

The reference to john Oliver's show had local preceding a that show police talking about the windfall that civil asset forfeiture has provided and how it is used. I can not do the subject any better than he has done in the ten minutes story on the subject.

Maybe comedy is the best way of presenting the topic as it is bringing to light a subject that most would prefer to believe does not happen in this country. Taking ones property without due process is wing and goes against the spirit of the constitution in every respect no matter your political leanings.

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John Weibel 1 month, 3 weeks ago on Jeremy Johnston: Support Prop. 105

Harvey,

If the us government is so concerned about food safety, then why does it not allow independent meat packers to test their product for mad cow disease? That would have allowed quicker re-entry of one packers products to japan and increased food safety.

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/money/industries/food/2006-03-23-mad-cow-suit_x.htm

Your statement about the billions spent on safe foods relates in no way or fashion. Most gmo foods have had zero food safety studies done on them. For the most part, gmo products are about controlling food supplies. Kissinger is quoted as " if you control the oil you control nations, if you control the food then you control the people".

Unfortunately, people have blind faith in our scientific community to do what is right. Many times that community is simply seeking out ways to reap greater profits. Gmo foods do nothing to increase food supplies, as in the other gmo thread, the UN, who I try not to reference ever as it takes government further from the people, believes the only way we can feed the world is with smaller scale organic farms. The chemicals, fertilizers and oil required to produce the row cropped foods in the us are completely unsustainable, are causing many environmental concerns and really have undermined our economy.

For every one job lost in industrial ag, the growing of gmo food, 3 would be recreated in a localized food system involving smaller farms. Unfortunately it takes a lot of capital to do so. Access to capital, or better the lack of, results in more poverty. As opposed to giving hand outs for food stamps, maybe creating more accessible capital pools, changing the tax codes to encourage employing people as opposed to technology we would start rebuilding the middle class that is being wiped out.

In addition this region might be greatly helped by this law in that there is a dormant grainary in Hayden that is trying to be reborn and yet that lack of capital is slowing its rebirth. Though I am trying to work with them to create a long term revolving loan fund to help rebuild the local food shed, that is very difficult in this county for a myriad of reasons.

Unfortunately the local regulations make it more expensive than elsewhere and potentially add food safety concerns

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John Weibel 1 month, 4 weeks ago on Joe Meglen: Is Constitution relevant?

Go watch the link as I do not have time to find the hearings (actual police testimony) that were presented in his comedy show.

By the way, call the need for free speech zones, for safety purposes, but really it is to keep the rif raft away and controlled so that dissent is quelled. From personal experience, you best not question gub-amint and the rules they follow blindly otherwise, they will punish you. Can't allow free thinkers, we need mindless sheep (zombies IMO) following every rule no matter how dumb and possibly creating greater risks to "the people" than whatever they are trying to prevent.

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John Weibel 1 month, 4 weeks ago on Our View: Proposition 105 is costly and confusing

Tim,

While sometimes I have used non-organic feed. Most of the time it has been certified organic feed supplements and primarily the grass that grows in the valley. Though, my chicken feed for the previous year, was non genetically modified, but not certified organic. Also, I will probably use local oats (non-GMO as long as the grower will grow them as the cows loved that the best, even more than the pot-porri of grains that they got most of the summer. Though on a percentage basis whatever it is is so small that it will have little impact on any nutritional components of the milk).

Anyway, the article really does not look into any facts that are not presented by the establishment, as with many Pilot articles. When people state you can not feed the world without GMO food, they have not looked at one of my least favorite organizations research, The UN, stating that smaller diversified organic farms really are the only way to feed the planet. Unfortunately, this country is not set up for small local food production on almost all levels, from tax revenue to the employment and taxation structure that penalizes people for hiring laborers and instead utilizing technology.

Anyway, voting for this might actually greatly benefit this county in that the grain elevators are independently operated and could be cleaned to handle the non-GMO grains that could easily be grown here. However, the propaganda machine can't let us believe there is another way.

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