Dan Kuechenmeister

Dan Kuechenmeister 2 weeks, 3 days ago on Minimum wage increase benefits some, not others

According to Mercury News there has been a negative migration from CA for 22 of the past 25 years. Maybe VDH is onto some thing.

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Dan Kuechenmeister 2 weeks, 3 days ago on Minimum wage increase benefits some, not others

Let's see. Should I believe Scott Wedel or Victor Davis Hanson. Hmmm. I think I will go with Victor Davis Hanson

Victor Davis Hanson (born September 5, 1953 in Fowler, California) is an American military historian, columnist, former classics professor, and scholar of ancient agrarian and military history. He has been a commentator on modern warfare and contemporary politics for National Review, The Washington Times and other media outlets. He is a professor emeritus of classics at California State University, Fresno, and is currently the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow in classics and military history at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. He chairs the Hoover working group on Military History and Contemporary Conflict as well as being the general editor of the Hoover online journal, Strategika. He has been a visiting professor at Hillsdale College where he teaches an intensive course on world, ancient or military history in the autumn semester, as the Wayne and Marcia Buske Distinguished Fellow in History since 2004.[1] Hanson is perhaps best known for his 2001 book Carnage and Culture: Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Power, a New York Times best-selling book.

Hanson was awarded the National Humanities Medal in 2007 by President George W. Bush, and was a presidential appointee in 2007-2008 on the American Battle Monuments Commission that oversees the cemeteries of and monuments of U.S. war dead abroad. Hanson is a student of current affairs, particularly regarding the U.S. in the Middle East, national defense issues and illegal immigration. He is also a fifth-generation farmer, growing almonds on a family farm in Selma, California where he resides, and is a commentator on social trends related to farming and agrarianism.

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Dan Kuechenmeister 1 month ago on Steamboat school board names Joey Andrew new president

Same here Rhys. After his little kerfuffle with his apartment I thought he seemed to back away from commenting. it was a nice respite, albeit short lived.

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Dan Kuechenmeister 1 month, 1 week ago on Scott Tipton: Looking forward to 115th Congress

Robert, you are entitled to your opinion but not your own set of facts. When Obama took office in January 2009 the national debt was $10.6 trillion. I am all for rounding up or down but $10.6 T is not pushing $13 T. Now going from $5T to $10.6 T is nothing to be happy about but to go from $10.6 to over $19T. Impressive - ah, not so much.

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Dan Kuechenmeister 1 month, 2 weeks ago on Additional victims come forward in sex assault case

So now Scott W. is telling us what type of costumes we can wear. Good Grief. I wear a Bavarian outfit for Oktoberfest- makes the Bier taste better, I wear a sombrero and a big moustache for Cinco de Mayo - makes the margarita taste better, I wear my Sunday best for Kentucky Derby - makes the mint julep taste better. Went to a Halloween party this year as a cat burglar. Which was I disparaging - cats, burglars or both.

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Dan Kuechenmeister 1 month, 2 weeks ago on Additional victims come forward in sex assault case

Safe spaces for college students. Good grief. University of Minnesota. 1970 - 1974. Vietnam War, protests, tear gas. No safe spaces. No cookies, cupcakes. We all survived. We accepted there were people with other views. We engaged in dialogue.

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Dan Kuechenmeister 1 month, 2 weeks ago on Jennifer Schubert-Akin: In uncertain times, look to America’s principles

Dan S, keep those posts coming. they are a constant reminder of how we ended up with President elect Trump.

In the category of what goes around comes around, AKA payback is a beach, AKA OOPS Here’s Senator Chris Coons of Delaware, basically begging Senate Republicans to reinstate the filibuster for nominations:

BOLDUAN: But Senator, also a rules change the Democrats put in place could also come back to bite you. I mean, I don't get into the weeds, but Democrats made it much easier than a simple majority can push through presidential nominees. Democrats did it for themselves and now Republicans can do it as well.

COONS: That's exactly right. The filibuster no longer acts as emergency brake on the nomination --

BOLDUAN: So do you regret that?

COONS: I do regret that. I frankly think many of us will regret that in this Congress because it would have been a terrific speed bump, potential emergency brake, to have in our system to slow down the confirmation of extreme nominees. We're instead going to have to depend on the American people, on thorough hearings and/or persuading a number of Republicans in those cases where President-elect Trump might nominate someone, who is just too extreme to the American people.

“Dear opponents who I have consistently demonized as the root of all evil for the past few years: please give up a power we gave you to save us from the consequences of our own decisions.

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