Rob Douglas

Rob Douglas 2 days, 21 hours ago on Our view: Free enterprise — up in smoke

I agree with every word of this editorial.

The statements during the meeting by Rocky Mountain Remedies co-owner Kevin Fisher, Golden Leaf co-owner Charlie Magnuson and the council (with the exception of Sonja Macys who I believe has distinguished herself as a council member to a degree I never imagined), provided a textbook example of disgraceful rent-seeking.

Having been an admirer of the way Kevin Fisher navigated the birth of the legal marijuana industry in a way that gave comfort to those who had doubts, it is disheartening to watch him attempt to close the door on those who might follow in his footsteps.

Fisher and the other local owners were able to capitalize on the libertarian spirit of Coloradans who were willing to defy the federal government by legalizing marijuana. Now Fisher and the other current owners want to use our local council as a regulatory body to block the granting of other marijuana sales licenses and, in so doing, prevent the natural progression and full implementation of Amendment 64.

As I said, classic and shameful rent-seeking - something that is common at the federal and state levels. Unfortunately, by its action this past week, the council can add rent-seeking to the other unseemly practices it has adopted.

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Rob Douglas 6 days, 14 hours ago on City council members raise concern about Triple Crown meetings

Our community owes Sonja Macys and Scott Ford gratitude for their vigilance in being sure that the public's business is conducted in public - not behind closed doors and/or by email.

Coincidentally, the Colorado Freedom of Information Coalition - a non-partisan alliance of journalists, engaged citizens, and supporters of government transparency - released its 2015 Guide to Colorado’s Open Meetings & Open Records Laws today. That guide is available in PDF format at http://coloradofoic.org/files/2015/05/SunshineGuide2015.pdf

For further information, see: http://coloradofoic.org/download-2015-guide-to-colorado-sunshine-laws/

Hopefully, every council member and member of the city management team will obtain a free copy of the guide and study it for future reference.

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Rob Douglas 2 weeks, 6 days ago on Hayden students seek justice for Syrian children

An excellent cause. Thank you to the teachers and students who are involved. Best of luck. And to Kendra DeMicco, safe travels!

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Rob Douglas 1 month ago on Boomer joins ranks at Sheriff's Office

Headline: "Supreme Court Says Police Violated 4th Amendment When Use of Drug-Sniffing Dog Prolonged Routine Traffic Stop"

From the article:

"In a 6-3 decision issued today in the case of Rodriguez v. United States, the U.S. Supreme Court held that Nebraska police violated the Fourth Amendment by extending an otherwise lawful traffic stop in order to let a drug-sniffing dog investigate the outside of the vehicle.

"According to the majority opinion of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, which was joined by Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Antonin Scalia, Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan, 'a police stop exceeding the time needed to handle the matter for which the stop was made violates the Constitution’s shield against unreasonable seizures.'

"While 'an officer...may conduct certain unrelated checks during an otherwise lawful traffic stop,' Ginsburg held, 'a dog sniff, unlike the routine measures just mentioned, is not an ordinary incident of a traffic stop.'

"At issue was a 2012 traffic stop conducted by a Nebraska police officer who happened to have his K-9 dog in the cruiser with him. When the stopped driver, Dennys Rodriguez, refused to consent to letting the drug dog walk around the outside of his vehicle, the Nebraska officer called for back-up, thereby prolonging the stop by an additional eight minutes. According to the Court’s ruling today, those extra minutes violated Rodriguez’s constitutional rights under the Fourth Amendment."

The article has a link to the full opinion of the Supreme Court.

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Rob Douglas 1 month ago on First dog on Routt County Sheriff's roster being trained to track people, sniff out narcotics

Headline: "Supreme Court Says Police Violated 4th Amendment When Use of Drug-Sniffing Dog Prolonged Routine Traffic Stop"

From the article:

"In a 6-3 decision issued today in the case of Rodriguez v. United States, the U.S. Supreme Court held that Nebraska police violated the Fourth Amendment by extending an otherwise lawful traffic stop in order to let a drug-sniffing dog investigate the outside of the vehicle.

"According to the majority opinion of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, which was joined by Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Antonin Scalia, Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan, 'a police stop exceeding the time needed to handle the matter for which the stop was made violates the Constitution’s shield against unreasonable seizures.'

"While 'an officer...may conduct certain unrelated checks during an otherwise lawful traffic stop,' Ginsburg held, 'a dog sniff, unlike the routine measures just mentioned, is not an ordinary incident of a traffic stop.'

"At issue was a 2012 traffic stop conducted by a Nebraska police officer who happened to have his K-9 dog in the cruiser with him. When the stopped driver, Dennys Rodriguez, refused to consent to letting the drug dog walk around the outside of his vehicle, the Nebraska officer called for back-up, thereby prolonging the stop by an additional eight minutes. According to the Court’s ruling today, those extra minutes violated Rodriguez’s constitutional rights under the Fourth Amendment."

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Rob Douglas 1 month, 1 week ago on Our view: Cameras don't change their stories

To restore faith in the American justice system is going to take more than body cameras. The system is rife with abuse, corruption, and malfeasance from top to bottom. It is a system that routinely imprisons the innocent. And it can no longer be denied that many innocents have been executed by means of the death penalty.

For just the latest example of what University of Virginia law professor Brandon L. Garrett said reveals "a 'mass disaster' inside the criminal justice system, one that it has been unable to self-correct because courts rely on outdated precedents admitting scientifically invalid testimony at trial and, under the legal doctrine of finality, make it difficult for convicts to challenge old evidence," every American should read today's lead story in the Washington Post.

The article, "FBI overstated forensic hair matches in nearly all trials before 2000," is just the latest body blow to a criminal justice system that many Americans are finally realizing is a sham when it comes to seeking "justice."

Here's the link again: http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/crime/fbi-overstated-forensic-hair-matches-in-nearly-all-criminal-trials-for-decades/2015/04/18/39c8d8c6-e515-11e4-b510-962fcfabc310_story.html?hpid=z1

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Rob Douglas 1 month, 1 week ago on Our view: Hurry up and slow down

Evidently the Editorial Board thinks Common Core has dumbed down the School Board, so they ran the same editorial twice. But, strangely, they deleted the comments of the School Board members from the first time this editorial ran. Wash, rinse, repeat.

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