Rob Douglas

Rob Douglas 5 days, 1 hour ago on Boomer joins ranks at Sheriff's Office

Headline: "Supreme Court Says Police Violated 4th Amendment When Use of Drug-Sniffing Dog Prolonged Routine Traffic Stop"

From the article:

"In a 6-3 decision issued today in the case of Rodriguez v. United States, the U.S. Supreme Court held that Nebraska police violated the Fourth Amendment by extending an otherwise lawful traffic stop in order to let a drug-sniffing dog investigate the outside of the vehicle.

"According to the majority opinion of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, which was joined by Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Antonin Scalia, Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan, 'a police stop exceeding the time needed to handle the matter for which the stop was made violates the Constitution’s shield against unreasonable seizures.'

"While 'an officer...may conduct certain unrelated checks during an otherwise lawful traffic stop,' Ginsburg held, 'a dog sniff, unlike the routine measures just mentioned, is not an ordinary incident of a traffic stop.'

"At issue was a 2012 traffic stop conducted by a Nebraska police officer who happened to have his K-9 dog in the cruiser with him. When the stopped driver, Dennys Rodriguez, refused to consent to letting the drug dog walk around the outside of his vehicle, the Nebraska officer called for back-up, thereby prolonging the stop by an additional eight minutes. According to the Court’s ruling today, those extra minutes violated Rodriguez’s constitutional rights under the Fourth Amendment."

The article has a link to the full opinion of the Supreme Court.

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Rob Douglas 6 days, 2 hours ago on First dog on Routt County Sheriff's roster being trained to track people, sniff out narcotics

Headline: "Supreme Court Says Police Violated 4th Amendment When Use of Drug-Sniffing Dog Prolonged Routine Traffic Stop"

From the article:

"In a 6-3 decision issued today in the case of Rodriguez v. United States, the U.S. Supreme Court held that Nebraska police violated the Fourth Amendment by extending an otherwise lawful traffic stop in order to let a drug-sniffing dog investigate the outside of the vehicle.

"According to the majority opinion of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, which was joined by Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Antonin Scalia, Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan, 'a police stop exceeding the time needed to handle the matter for which the stop was made violates the Constitution’s shield against unreasonable seizures.'

"While 'an officer...may conduct certain unrelated checks during an otherwise lawful traffic stop,' Ginsburg held, 'a dog sniff, unlike the routine measures just mentioned, is not an ordinary incident of a traffic stop.'

"At issue was a 2012 traffic stop conducted by a Nebraska police officer who happened to have his K-9 dog in the cruiser with him. When the stopped driver, Dennys Rodriguez, refused to consent to letting the drug dog walk around the outside of his vehicle, the Nebraska officer called for back-up, thereby prolonging the stop by an additional eight minutes. According to the Court’s ruling today, those extra minutes violated Rodriguez’s constitutional rights under the Fourth Amendment."

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Rob Douglas 1 week, 1 day ago on Our view: Cameras don't change their stories

To restore faith in the American justice system is going to take more than body cameras. The system is rife with abuse, corruption, and malfeasance from top to bottom. It is a system that routinely imprisons the innocent. And it can no longer be denied that many innocents have been executed by means of the death penalty.

For just the latest example of what University of Virginia law professor Brandon L. Garrett said reveals "a 'mass disaster' inside the criminal justice system, one that it has been unable to self-correct because courts rely on outdated precedents admitting scientifically invalid testimony at trial and, under the legal doctrine of finality, make it difficult for convicts to challenge old evidence," every American should read today's lead story in the Washington Post.

The article, "FBI overstated forensic hair matches in nearly all trials before 2000," is just the latest body blow to a criminal justice system that many Americans are finally realizing is a sham when it comes to seeking "justice."

Here's the link again: http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/crime/fbi-overstated-forensic-hair-matches-in-nearly-all-criminal-trials-for-decades/2015/04/18/39c8d8c6-e515-11e4-b510-962fcfabc310_story.html?hpid=z1

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Rob Douglas 1 week, 5 days ago on Our view: Hurry up and slow down

Evidently the Editorial Board thinks Common Core has dumbed down the School Board, so they ran the same editorial twice. But, strangely, they deleted the comments of the School Board members from the first time this editorial ran. Wash, rinse, repeat.

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Rob Douglas 2 weeks, 2 days ago on City manager no longer overseeing investigation into police department

Hinsvark stepping aside for Small - three weeks after the distribution of the Kleiber letter - is nothing more than window dressing. It's an exchange of one pea for another in the pod.

An impartial, fair and transparent investigation is critical to the immediate future of Steamboat Springs and for the careers of the individuals named in the multiple letters now widely circulating. Sadly, the process and steps taken to date have been mostly a farce.

It's time for some adults in Steamboat to run for City Council as the November election approaches. The children on the council have wreaked enough havoc.

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Rob Douglas 3 weeks, 1 day ago on Excessive force, excessive lawsuits

Given that a bedrock principle in the United States is that the police operate under civilian authority and oversight, this article raises public policy issues that are worthy of further exploration.

What did the Steamboat Springs City Council know about these alleged incidents of excessive force and civil rights violations and when did it know it?

What did the city council know about the internal affairs investigations and when did it know it?

Was there ever a public briefing at a council meeting that would have put the public on notice that there may have been a rise in the number of alleged incidents of excessive force and that the city was investigating the issue?

Was there ever a secret session of the council at which these cases were discussed so that the council could act in its oversight capacity and provide direction?

Has the council ever been provided the details in this newspaper account by its attorneys or is this the first time it is learning of some, much, or most of this material?

Has the council ever listened to the complete tape recording discussed in this article?

Has the council ever examined the number and underlying circumstances, if any, of police officers dismissed for cause?

If the council was aware of these incidents and investigations, why did it not hold a public discussion/hearing so that the public would be aware of a potential problem and be informed what steps the city was taking to investigate and address any potential excessive force issues?

Many communities have a council person who is designated as the police commissioner (or a similar title) so that there is an elected representative who keeps closer contact with the police department. Has the council ever discussed instituting that position?

Many communities have a Police Civilian Review Commission (or similar title) consisting of civilians who act as an immediate oversight body - similar to the Parks and Recreation Commission. Has the council discussed creating such a commission?

Those are just a small number of the questions and issues this article raises. But they all hinge on knowing what, if any, oversight the council has exercised when it comes to the police department.

I hope those issues will be explored.

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Rob Douglas 3 weeks, 4 days ago on Scott Bideau: URA frustrations

What Scott Bideau's painstaking transcript of what many of us witnessed first-hand proves is that a majority of the council is well-qualified to run for the U.S. Congress where saying one thing while doing another is par for the course.

Watching Tony Connell try to spin his words after the fact - and watching Tony Lettunich try to provide cover for the council not abiding by its own motion - was one of the saddest moments in the council's recent history.

Bottom line: If you do business with this council, beware. Their motions and their promises mean nothing.

Come to think of it, just like the contracts they sign. [see airport story]

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Rob Douglas 3 weeks, 4 days ago on New parking enforcement technology tested in Steamboat's downtown business district

April 2, 2015

"DHS Renews Quest for Access to National License Plate Tracking System" --The Washington Post

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/dhs-renews-quest-for-access-to-national-license-plate-tracking-system/2015/04/02/4d79385a-d8a1-11e4-8103-fa84725dbf9d_story.html

"The Department of Homeland Security is seeking bids from companies able to provide law enforcement officials with access to a national license-plate tracking system — a year after canceling a similar solicitation over privacy issues.

"The reversal comes after officials said they had determined they could address concerns raised by civil liberties advocates and lawmakers about the prospect of the department gaining widespread access, without warrants, to a system that holds billions of records that reveal drivers’ whereabouts.

"In a privacy impact assessment to be issued Thursday, DHS clarifies it is not seeking to build a national database or contribute data to an existing system.

"Instead, it is seeking bids from companies that already gather the data to say how much they would charge to grant access to law enforcement officers at the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency. ...

"Privacy advocates who reviewed a copy of the privacy assessment said it fell short.

"'If this goes forward, DHS will have warrantless access to location information going back at least five years about virtually every adult driver in the U.S., and sometimes, to their image as well,' said Gregory T. Nojeim, senior counsel for the Center for Democracy & Technology."

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