George Hresko

George Hresko 8 months ago on Steamboat businesses look to revive campaign to stress local spending

Jerry-Thanks on the sales tax. On the other issues, I believe all sellers in town are likely tied to a price for truckload sales in the Denver area--i.e. rack sale of full truck load. There might be a little difference among the buyers, but not anything like 10 or 15 cpg. IOW there is no benefit to the refiner to sell to one marketer at a lower price than to another, even to his own marketing arm. If the marketer is obtaining their product from the refiner via an exchange then perhaps the marketer may use an imputed cost of the product ex a refinery somewhere else. But that would mean that the company is choosing to subsidize a marketer in an area remote from their own refinery. Transportation costs for a full truckload do not vary among the companies by much either. So, in the SS market, the volume doesn't exist for someone to have the kind of volume that would afford a price reduction as we see for example at Costco, even if they sold at no mark-up, which they clearly cannot afford to do here, but which Costco can. My guess (I don't have actual volumes for service stations here) is that the average station in Routt County receives1 or maybe 2 truckloads of fuel a week where a high volume station in the metro area gets one or more daily.

0

George Hresko 8 months ago on Steamboat businesses look to revive campaign to stress local spending

Jerry-Of course top up in Silverthorne on the way back, assuming you filled at Costco-Wadsworth first!!!!! Not sure what you mean by lack of competition in SS. I count 7 outlets along Lincoln. Yes, payroll is not the major factor--thruput volume is. Yes, Wyoming taxes are much lower. What is the Summit County / Silverthorne sales tax rate vs SS?

0

George Hresko 8 months ago on Steamboat businesses look to revive campaign to stress local spending

John-

Not sure of your question--if about butane, gasoline in tank is cold, needs to vaporize a bit to ignite. FI probably helps, but for carbureted engines, cold means less vaporization--butane vaporizes more easily. If question is in re mass measure, probably if you buy a shipload then you can buy gasoline by weight. For gasoline, diesel, volume sales been practice probably due to types of measurements available--trucks tanks, etc. For fuel oil, usual measure is weight.

0

George Hresko 8 months, 1 week ago on Steamboat businesses look to revive campaign to stress local spending

Gasoline is less dense in the winter because butane is added to improve ignition during low temperature periods--vaporizes at lower temperatures. Less density means lower heat content per gallon--we all are used to thinking in terms of fuel efficiency per a volume rather than per a mass measure.

0

George Hresko 8 months, 1 week ago on Steamboat businesses look to revive campaign to stress local spending

Shannon-

You are right; it doesn't. But there are added costs to sell gasoline in SS versus one of the larger stations in Silverthorne or Denver. Land cost here is likely greater. Station thruput is very likely much, much less, on average, than in those other locations. Construction of service stations here is likely more expensive too, for the same physical facilities, and probably pay here is greater than would be incurred in Denver, maybe also in Silverthorne. On the revenue side, those hi thruput stations likely also sell more add-ons than do the stations here.

And, while the Kum and Go in Silverthorne is priced as you described, did you happen to look at the price of the Shell station immediately at the exit of I-70 in Silverthorne?

Cheers!

0

George Hresko 9 months ago on Karl Koehler: Do your homework

Sam-As a financial advisor perhaps you can tell me, what are the critical assumptions driving your financial recommendations for buying these solar panels. What is the payout period for these panels? How much is the subsidy by the government? What are the assumed electricity rates that solar will earn? What are the annual maintenance and operating costs? Thanks.

0

George Hresko 9 months ago on Yes on Amendment 66: The right choice for Colorado schools

Sue-I've read the link. Everywhere the 'explanation' says 'can' I would prefer that it say 'will'. For example, instead of can add 1000 teachers, will add. There appears to be little assurance what actually will happen if 66 becomes law, other than that our taxes will increase, and apparently for Steamboat Springs School District, as pointed out above, the net increase is roughly $5 million annually! I would appreciate it if you would tell us, here in Routt County, how much more than the $133 that you are quoting the average family will be paying, that we will be passing over. It appears to me that it is as much as $1,000 per family here.

0

George Hresko 9 months, 1 week ago on Our View: Vote 'no' on Amendment 66

Charles-Thank you for taking the time to respond. Looks like we have here the all-too-typical problem of definition, in this case what is 'average'? In the case described by you, it clearly means the 'mean', that is the total incremental cost divided by the total number of households, which I happen to think is the appropriate measure. The 66 proponents are just as clearly, now that you have exposed it, using the median value--i.e. half the households fall below and half the households are above the number. The difference between the mean and median is already three times, i.e. the mean value is three times the median value! I suspect that for the SS School District the per household average cost is much higher than even the statewide mean, and would appreciate a knowledgeable, numerate reader here to provide the figures that we will pay. Double the mean? Five or six times the median?

0

George Hresko 9 months, 1 week ago on Our View: Vote 'no' on Amendment 66

All Above Commenters-I am confused with the information provided not only in this editorial, but also with the advertisements provided by the 66 supporters. For those of you numerically inclined, I am trying to understand just how much this amendment will cost. The adverts refer to an 'average', and I recall an old expression that one can drown in a stream averaging less than six inches deep. It appears that the SS School District tax payers will be net out of pocket about $5 million annually. How much more than the statewide average of $133 per household is this $5 million? If we are average, then we must have about 37,000 households. If we are twice average, then we must have 18 to 19,000 households in the SS School District! With a RC population of roughly 20 thousand, both of these numbers beggar the imagination. So, just what is the per household cost for SS School District taxpayers? What multiple of the statewide average is that? Numbers like those will help me, and perhaps others make up their minds on the amendment.

0

George Hresko 1 year, 1 month ago on The Record for June 16, 2013

For those interested in the US 40 through Steamboat Springs issue and how it affects our town, its atmosphere, and economy in the future, here are three thought experiments you might try:

1.) It’s said our town population will pass 20,000 by 2030. Imagine the US40 traffic flow through Steamboat Springs from say the bottom of Rabbit Ears to Heritage Park or Steamboat Golf Club; without changes to the route itself. 2.) Start on US 40 where it leaves I-70 and journey west through the various towns-Winter Park, Granby, on to the other end where in joins I-80 in Utah, and Heber City. Ask yourself which of those towns’ main street today best demonstrates what Steamboat Springs US-40 ought to be. 3.) In 2008, a bypass of US 95 around Sandpoint, ID was undertaken at a cost near $150 million. How was this accomplished in a relatively small, relatively minor ski town?

0

Prev