Aaron Cramer

Aaron Cramer 1 year, 8 months ago on Medora Fralick: A Hayden success story

I would also like to point out that we are not a bunch of below average students. This may be a contradiction from this test, but until you come into our school and see that we are producing successful students, I ask that you do not base your opinion on this one test. Base it on the number of students that are receiving great jobs and entering into the honors programs in universities across this country. You could also base it on the fact that we have dozens of students that are finding a career directly out of high school as a result of their vocational classes here at Hayden. There are students that have come out of this school making six figures as under water welders. These students may not have scored where you think they should in order to be defined as successful, but in my mind they are certainly successful. There are also students that may have done extremely well on these tests, maybe even students from Steamboat or Soroco, that do not have jobs and are unemployed. My point is to define the success of an individual on the score that they got on a test their freshman of sophomore year of high school may be a little bit drastic. These students still have every opportunity in the world to succeed, and I believe that Hayden High School has given me and every other student in the school every opportunity to succeed. I want the public to know that this school is a wonderful place for a student to grow and learn. The opportunities that the teachers present us with are something that maybe unseen, but I will have you know that the teachers, administration, and parents have given us every tool that we need to be successful.

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Aaron Cramer 1 year, 8 months ago on Medora Fralick: A Hayden success story

Scott: As a student of HHS, member of the student council, and also an athlete on the football and basketball team, I would like to interject my thoughts and ideas on this issue. On the topic of our scores, a huge percentage of the students in our high school do not care about how well they do on the TCAP test. It is a test that ultimately is not going to be a deciding factor in getting into the college they would like or a job they want out of high school. Sadly, this is the truth. The students do not bother to take these tests seriously. There is no incentive for them. Sure, it makes the school look better, but what does that matter? The school is going to still teach them, the teachers are going to continue to care about our education, and the students are still going to learn. The idea of giving students an incentive to take these tests to the best of our ability needs to be taken seriously. I know for a fact that if the students of this school had incentive to take these tests seriously, the school would look better and people would be happier with the results. Also, I find it offensive to hear this negativity aimed towards our school from somebody who is basing their judgment on a number. I do not think that is fair to do and truly do not believe that your judgment or this number is an accurate representation of Hayden high school. I am here at this school taking these tests, watching them race through to see who can fill in their bubbles fastest. I do not know if you can say that we are doing a miserable job at teaching the students if you have not been here. Have you watched the students “prepare” for these test or seen their motives when taking them? It is an awfully big assumption to say that these scores are defining us as a school full of kids who are below average. On your point about our football team, we are not a bunch of no brains meat heads that do not know anything other than route combinations or blocking schemes. Since the time I entered Hayden I have seen numerous members of our athletic programs go out and do big things. We have athletes that are going to wonderful schools such as the Colorado School of Mines, Cal Poly, and Cornell to name a few. This year some of the top members of the teams are also among the top scholastic students in our school. I don’t think that it is even a realistic thought to take away from our practice time to teach what are teachers are already doing very well in the classroom.

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