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Power Play Coal Photos

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The Craig Station power plant, shown here on June 20 and operated by Tri-State Generation and Transmission, works day and night to pump out 1,300 megawatts of electrical power. Photo by Brian Ray

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Giant power lines carry electrical power out of Hayden Station and onto the western power grid just east of Hayden. Power generated at Hayden Station serves electrical customers as far away as California. Photo by Brian Ray

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The Craig Station Power Plant, shown here on June 20, is operated by Tri-State Generation and Transmission and works day and night to pump out 1,300 megawatts of electrical power. Photo by Brian Ray

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Power plant director Sharon Brady, from front, technical specialist Glenn Jones and Ron Murphy, plant engineer, lead a team of operators at the Xcel Energy-owned Hayden Station in the generation of 446 megawatts of electrical power. Photo by Brian Ray

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Coal feeders work to deliver coal to combustion chambers inside Hayden Station during a plant tour July 2. The feeders are able to process more than 17 tons of coal per hour. Photo by Brian Ray

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Technical specialist Glenn Jones describes operation of the cooling towers during a plant tour at Hayden Station on July 2. The cooling towers work to cool and condense steam heated during the coal combustion process so that it can be reused. Photo by Brian Ray

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Sharon Brady, director of Hayden Station, explains the coal-powered electrical generation process during a plant tour in Hayden on July 2. Photo by Brian Ray

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One of two stacks at Hayden Station works continuously to pump off excess water vapor as the plant pumps out 446 megawatts of electrical power July 2. Photo by Brian Ray

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Jeff Scheele, a control room operator at Hayden Station, helps to monitor a series of computer screens July 2. The control room operators are capable of controlling more than 95 percent of all the plant's operations from a single room. Photo by Brian Ray

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An electronic control panel deep within the Hayden Station Power Plant provides operators with data regarding the coal feeder's rate of activity. Photo by Brian Ray

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Feedwater heater tanks operate continuously to keep steam flowing throughout the closed loop of the power-generation sector in Hayden Station on July 2. Photo by Brian Ray

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Mountains of coal arrive daily at the Hayden Station Power Plant in order to keep the plant running at full capacity. The plant burns about 5,000 tons of coal each day and nearly 1.8 million tons each year. Photo by Brian Ray

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Mountains of coal arrive daily at the Hayden Station Power Plant in order to keep the plant running at full capacity. The plant burns about 5,000 tons of coal each day and nearly 1.8 million tons each year. Photo by Brian Ray

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Safety signs, such as this one shown on July 2, hang on several walls inside and outside of Hayden Station. Safety is the utmost concern for the 95 employees at the plant. Photo by Brian Ray

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The baghouse at Hayden Station, shown here during a tour on July 2, helps clean and purify the byproducts of coal combustion in order to help the plant meet current EPA regulations for clean air and material discharge. Photo by Brian Ray

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Hayden Station, shown here during a plant tour July 2, burns about 5,000 tons of coal each day, 1.8 million tons of coal each year and generates about 446 megawatts of electrical power. Photo by Brian Ray

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A maze made up of many miles of piping winds throughout the 13 stories of the Hayden Station power plant, carrying the super-heated steam and coal dust necessary to generate 446 megawatts of electrical power. Photo by Brian Ray

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Hundreds of footprints line the walkways through the bowels of Hayden Station during a plant tour July 2. The footprints are made in a small layer of extremely fine coal dust that spews from tiny pinholes in the coal pipes leading to the generators. Photo by Brian Ray

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