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Shifting Currents - Part Five

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Earthmovers carve subdivision roads out of the desert at the new Dixie Springs development. It is situated between St. George, Utah, and the entrance to Zion National Park at Springdale, Utah. New homes would be only two miles from power boating at Sand Hollow Reservoir State Park, which stores domestic water for St. George. Dixie Springs, together with two other developments - Sky Ranch and Cliff Dwellers - will add 40,000 residential building lots to the historical town of Hurricane City. The present population of Hurricane City is just more than 13,000. The local newspaper reports that Hurricane City's population someday could exceed 150,000. Photo by Tom Ross

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A course maintenance worker at the 27-hole Sunbrook Golf Club in St. George, Utah, applies water to the browning fringe of a green in the midst of a 107-degree afternoon. Golf in St. George is the counterpart to skiing and snowboarding in Steamboat Springs for second-home owners and retirees. Photo by Tom Ross

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The entrance to the Sunbrook development in St. George, Utah, is marked by lush plantings and natural-looking fountains. Photo by Tom Ross

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A view of Lake Powell, where water from the Yampa, Green and Colorado rivers is stored. St. George and Utah state officials are proposing to spend about $400 million to pump water out of Lake Powell and pipe it 120 miles west to their growing communities. Photo by Tyler Arroyo

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Many homes in St. George depend heavily on desert plants for their landscaping. Many others are landscaped with a carpet of irrigated bluegrass. Photo by Tyler Arroyo

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The Colorado River immediately below Glen Canyon Dam at Lake Powell is currently carrying 13,400 cubic feet per second of water as it winds toward the Grand Canyon and Lake Mead beyond. Lake Powell was at just 52 percent of capacity July 11. Photo by Tom Ross

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Kent Christiansen treats his friends to a wakeboarding session on a blisteringly hot evening at Sand Hollow Reservoir. Sand Hollow, the newest state park in southern Utah, stores domestic water for the city of St. George, about 15 miles away. Photo by Tom Ross

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Robert Bonds, who moved to St. George to escape the crowded highways of Pasadena, Calif., cools off with a cliff dive at Sand Hollow Reservoir. Photo by Tom Ross

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Thunderclouds building over Pine Valley Mountain offer the promise of rain for St. George, Utah, where skies are already hazy from the smoke of wildfires. The clouds produced lightning but no moisture in St. George, which receives just 8.3 inches of precipitation annually. Photo by Tom Ross

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