Scott Tipton: Creating jobs, opportunities for Colorado | SteamboatToday.com

Scott Tipton: Creating jobs, opportunities for Colorado







Owning a small business for 30 years in Cortez taught me a lot. I learned first hand the impact an overbearing government can have on a business' ability to create jobs.

There were times when I would have to forfeit my own paycheck in order to make sure my employees and bills got paid. Putting your employees and your community first is an important experience and ultimately is what led me to public service. It has been an honor to represent the district where I grew up, went to college and started my family and business.

During my time in Congress, I have focused on passing bipartisan legislation that emphasizes local control and adaptive and responsive regulation. This approach is critical in getting government out of the way so our local job creators can do what they do best: innovate and create jobs.

I am proud of my record in Congress. Passing 11 bills through the House with bipartisan support has not been easy in this era of partisan bickering, but I have found that focusing on common-sense solutions can help tear down many of these partisan divides.

The TAILOR act is one of these bills that focus on solutions, not partisan politics. One of the worst unintended consequences of the Dodd-Frank legislation has been that our community banks and local credit unions have practically been regulated out of existence. The TAILOR Act allows small community banks to go back to working in the communities they serve, helping small businesses and families with the access to capital they need to survive. There is no reason your local credit union should be regulated the same way as JP Morgan, as is currently the law under Dodd-Frank.  

Recommended Stories For You

I have sponsored bi-partisan bills to protect our public lands, forests and water. The Water Rights Protection Act and the Healthy Forest and Wildfire Prevention Act are both locally focused bills that protect our natural resources, whether they are our rivers, mountains or forests.

The Rural Hydroelectric Jobs Act I sponsored was signed by the president after receiving just seven total “no” votes. Creating jobs and providing a reliable and affordable energy supply should not be a partisan issue, and my legislation is a testament to that.

I have worked hard to find common ground in Washington, and my record proves that. However, there is still much progress to be made.

An all-of-the-above energy policy used to be one of those platforms where parties could find common ground. A true all-of-the-above energy policy includes wind, solar, nuclear, geothermal and hydroelectric but also traditional fossil fuel sources like coal, oil and natural gas.

One area where I have found common ground is to support and promote hydroelectric energy. I would encourage more of my colleagues from the other side of the aisle to stand up for the coal industry, support the Jordan Cove LNG terminal and support the Keystone XL pipeline. All of these measures put American energy and American jobs first.

Unfortunately, my opponent's record proves she does not support a true all-of-the-above energy policy. As a state senator, Schwartz sponsored legislation that devastated coal communities in her district, putting coal miners out of work and raising utility rates for businesses and families. Sponsoring legislation that puts your constituents out of work is no way to represent them.  

If Gail Schwartz was unable to balance the diverse interests of her state senate district, how is she going to handle the over 50,000 square miles of the 3rd Congressional District?

Whether it is finding common-sense financial regulation or protecting our forests and water, I will continue to fight for the hardworking families of Colorado. Creating jobs and opportunities for all Coloradans will be my number one priority, and I look forward to continuing to serve.  

Republican Scott Tipton is seeking re-election as U.S. representative for Colorado's 3rd Congressional District.

Go back to article