Romick acquires $1.06M downtown Steamboat storefront where he once shopped for toys | SteamboatToday.com

Romick acquires $1.06M downtown Steamboat storefront where he once shopped for toys

Photographer and custom frame builder Jace Romick has moved his gallery to 833 Lincoln Ave., where some of his childhood dreams reside.

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — As a little boy growing up in Steamboat Springs almost more than four decades ago, Jace Romick always looked forward to a visit to the toy display in the back of the DelHaute family jewelry store on Lincoln Avenue in Steamboat Springs. Now, he owns the building.

Romick, a fine-art photographer, craftsman and designer, purchased the DelHaute building at 833 Lincoln Ave. this week and plans to move Jace Romick Gallery there from its current location in the Chief Theater.

"I'm remodeling right now and will open (Dec. 1) for First Friday Art Walk, then close down and finish remodeling," Romick said. "This is what I've wanted to do for a long time."

However, when Romick was a boy of about 11 years, what he cared about most was a model airplane in the DelHautes' toy display at the rear of their jewelry store.

"Probably 45 years ago, I can remember going to look at the toys in the back of the jewelry store," Romick recalled. "The model airplane had a motor on it and was attached to a string. It took me a couple of months to save up the money to buy it. After saving all that money, the second time I flew it, I crashed it and totaled it."

Romick grew up to become a U.S. ski team member and competed on the World Cup and in the World Championships. Later, he founded Into the West furniture store, originally a block away from the DelHaute Building on Lincoln.

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Romick has had success selling his Western-themed, large photographic prints (they're rarely printed smaller than 24 by 36 inches) mounted in the custom wood and metal frames he builds himself.

Romick has gallery representation in Vail and Aspen, Scottsdale, Arizona, Park City and Jackson, Wyoming. One of his prize photographs from 2017 is of two bison battling in Yellowstone. It was a successful gallery show in Jackson that encouraged Romick to take a big step and acquire his own building.

"I had a great show this fall, where I had really good sales, and realized, it's time for me to start repping my own work," Romick said. “The Chief worked out really well for me as a way to bring in clients by appointment and show them my work. But I didn't have visibility there, and I had to tear my (display) down 52 times a year so they could hold church services there."

Romick initially intended to lease a space in the DelHaute Building, but after consulting with his banker, he realized he could acquire the building.

According to records on file at the Routt County Assessor’s Office, he purchased the 5,400-square-foot building for $1.06 million.

After ski season, Romick said he intends to completely remodel the office spaces on the second floor of his building with an eye toward leasing to new office and perhaps retail tenants. 

To reach Tom Ross, call 970-871-4205, email tross@SteamboatToday.com or follow him on Twitter @ThomasSRoss1.

N.E. Del and Marie “Decie” DelHaute came to Steamboat Springs in 1946 and purchased Sather’s Jewelry Shop on Lincoln Ave. They added toys to their inventory in the 1960s, just in time to catch the Hula Hoop craze. There were no other toy stores in town, according to an article in the Steamboat Pilot.

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