Gardening columns

Subscribe

Tease photo

Colorado Master Gardeners: Become a Master Gardener

The summer gardening season is officially over. If the killing frosts we’ve gotten haven’t convinced you, maybe the falling leaves have. And if that’s not enough evidence, the calendar finally confirms it.

Tease photo

Colorado Master Gardeners: Gardening with beneficial friends

At 7,000 feet, where the outdoor gardening season can be fickle and short-lived, the idea of stuffing our large window planters with vegetables and enjoying vine fresh tomatoes at Christmas held huge appeal. Little did I know I was starting a whole new gardening adventure.

Tease photo

Colorado Master Gardeners: Blue Ribbon Gardening — a conversation with Eileen Grover

According to Master Gardener Eileen Grover, successful vegetable gardening in Steamboat started with the local Master Gardener class in 2004, where she met inspiring local gardeners, learned about mountain gardening and saw firsthand what grows best in Routt County.

Tease photo

Colorado Master Gardeners: How to install a rock garden

My husband and I recently decided to install a rock garden, or rather, I decided, and he foolishly agreed.

Tease photo

Colorado Master Gardeners: Decorative ground cover or weed?

A cultivated plant that has caught my attention in the garden I inherited a few years back is called snow-on-the-mountain, goutweed or bishop’s weed. It is a pretty ground cover that provides visual interest for much of the summer but gets rather shabby and thirsty looking by August.

Tease photo

Colorado Master Gardeners: Master Gardeners tour Eagle Valley, Betty Ford Alpine Gardens

Twenty-five Routt County Master Gardeners and Colorado State Extension agent Todd Hagenbuch recently toured several Eagle Valley and Routt County gardens.

Tease photo

Colorado Master Gardeners: Something totally different — sea holly

My introduction to Eryngium, or sea holly, was at a friend’s garden party earlier this summer. I saw it again a few weeks later in the garden at Eagle’s CSU Extension Office and again at Betty Ford Alpine Gardens. It makes me wonder how I missed this striking plant until now.

Tease photo

Colorado Master Gardeners: Plants need companions too


I learned about companion planting a lifetime ago while studying permaculture and urban gardening in Oregon. When hearing of the term, I still remember my vision of a little, old couple sitting in their rocking chairs, side-by-side, comforted by their similarities and complemented by their differences.

Tease photo

Colorado Master Gardeners: Spreading dogbane — weed or wildflower?

In David Whiting’s “The Science of Gardening,” landscape weeds have many definitions, including: plants growing where they are unwanted, visually unattractive plants, plants that pose a health or safety hazard and plants that displace more desirable plants in the garden.

Tease photo

Colorado Master Gardeners: Spirea in the garden

I have several plants hiding in plain sight. Landscaped by the previous owner, my yard has a variety of cultivars tucked into inconspicuous places: hugging a wall, behind a showy perennial, hiding beneath bushes and the like. A white flowering spirea bush is one of them.

Tease photo

Colorado Master Gardeners: Growing clematis

I went home, inspired to find the clematis growing in my garden and determined to make it healthy.

Tease photo

Colorado Master Gardeners: Composting in the Yampa Valley

Composting in rural Colorado — a region robust with wildlife and challenged by severe weather — can be tricky, but it can be done.

Tease photo

Colorado Master Gardeners: Managing whitetop

Have you noticed that the hillsides in Routt County have turned white again? No, Old Man Winter has not returned. What you’re seeing is the bloom of hoary cress, or ‘whitetop,’ one of Routt County’s most aggressive noxious weeds.

Tease photo

Colorado Master Gardeners: Vole control

When the snow melts in the spring, you may notice tunneling throughout your lawn and damage to the bark of your trees and shrubs. This damage is likely caused by voles.

Tease photo

Colorado Master Gardeners: CSU Master Gardeners here for you

If, as a gardener, you are looking for advice, information or just camaraderie, look no further. CSU Master Gardener volunteers will be available from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Thursday beginning May 19 and continuing through late August to answer your gardening questions.

Previous