Book Review: 4 must-reads for sci-fi aficionados | SteamboatToday.com

Book Review: 4 must-reads for sci-fi aficionados

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

by Philip K. Dick

"…ultimately, the empathetic gift blurred the boundaries between hunter and victim, between the successful and the defeated." As the basis for the cinematic masterpiece “Blade Runner,” Philip K. Dick's “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?” is a must-read for any sci-fi fan. The book follows Rick Deckard, a bounty hunter searching for illegal androids hiding on Earth. As his hunt progresses and the danger increases, Deckard must grapple with questions about the nature of consciousness, empathy, and biological vs. mechanical life. Dark, thought-provoking, and wonderfully bizarre, this book presents the fantastic possibilities of sci-fi as only Philip K. Dick can deliver.

 

 

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‘Artemis’

by Andy Weir

The years of waiting for Weir's next book are over! Following his massively successful debut novel “The Martian,” Weir returns to science fiction with “Artemis.” This new story follows Jazz Bashara, a petty smuggler struggling to get by in Artemis, the only city on the moon. In trying to pull off her biggest job yet, she becomes embroiled in a conflict that could decide the fate of the city and everyone in it. While Weir's story may at times require a willful suspension of disbelief, it is nonetheless replete with his characteristic nerdiness and snark. And while the dialogue may sometimes seem off and the technical knowledge of vacuum welding excessive, the book remains a wildly fun and engaging read for fans of science fiction and nerdy trivia. Release date: November 13th.

 

 

‘Cat’s Cradle’

by Kurt Vonnegut

"Nothing in this book is true." But Vonnegut once again brings to life what very well could become true in the strongest work of his career, “Cat's Cradle.” An apocalyptic vision into humanity's future, this book is ingeniously hysterical, but also absolutely terrifying, because of how absurd yet entirely possible these situations seem. Vonnegut is the master of dark comedy and satire, and the way he approaches the dark sides of humanity with such optimism and gusto is what makes his writing totally and utterly unique. A very different and pinnacle voice in the realm of science fiction.

 

 

 

‘Neverwhere’

by Neil Gaiman

I am madly, deeply in love with every little thing by Neil Gaiman. That being said, “Neverwhere” is by far my favorite. Richard is a very regular man, a creature of comfort who is well-adapted to his office job, high-end apartment and successful fiancee. But life as he knows it gets flipped upside down when he finds Door, unconscious and bleeding, on a nighttime walk, and together they traverse through the magical and dangerous world of London Below. Reading Gaiman's books as an adult gives me that same sense of excitement I got while reading Harry Potter as a kid. I consider him the greatest fantasy author of our time, and you will not regret picking up a copy of “Neverwhere.”

 

 

Reviews are by bookseller Will Horner and marketing & events coordinator Marissa Mattson.

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