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B & B potential family home

Walking into the bed and breakfast on Pine Street, visitors are welcomed by the warm scent of cinnamon and spices.

The first thing you want to do — after sampling an oatmeal cookie from the dining room table — is snuggle with a good book in the cozy parlor.

Or enjoy a cup of tea on the quiet deck, watching leaves flutter from the trees.

Or burrow into a large antique bed in one of the inn’s eight private suites.

It’s not surprising that the Steamboat B & B, in operation for more than 15 years, has attracted a loyal base of customers looking for an alternative lodging experience.

The business holds continued potential for growth. But the property also is an ideal investment for a group of families that might continue to run the B & B or savor the large, renovated home and convenient downtown location for themselves, said Steve Downs, the listing broker.

Everything about the B & B speaks of comfort and charm — the kind that can come only from a property steeped in history.

The site, more than a 1/2-acre, once hosted the first church in Steamboat Springs. It was completed in 1893, and an annex — now the B & B — was added in 1955.

The sanctuary and annex served many faithful parishioners until 1986, when the sanctuary was struck by lightning and nearly burned to the ground.

Soon after, Steve and Sandy Evans purchased the annex and what was left of the sanctuary with a vision of transforming it into a bed and breakfast.

The ambitious project turned the basic-looking annex into the Victorian-style home that exists today.

The couple salvaged parts of the sanctuary, including wooden floorboards and corbels, and incorporated them into the renovated annex.

In addition to complementing rooms with Victorian molding, trim and accents, Steve Evans also cut out windows and dormers in third floor rooms.

The Evans operated the B & B for several years before selling the property to Gordon Hattersley in 1991.

Hattersley took the structure and business to the next level, filling it with antiques and restored furniture from as far as Europe.

“My vision was to create a really nice alternative to hotels and motels in Steamboat,” he said.

Hattersley added an outdoor hot tub and sauna cottage to the property and accentuated the gardens — where the sanctuary once stood — with more plants and bulbs.

He also replaced the roof and completed a remodel of the large kitchen, installing modern amenities and finishes, including granite countertops and stainless steel appliances.

It’s hard to keep track of all the rooms in the home. On the main floor, in addition to a parlor, kitchen, TV room and dining area, there is a large bedroom/office suite.

On the second and third floors, there are eight bedroom and bathroom suites, immaculately clean and decorated in fitting Victorian, mountain motifs.

Almost all antiques, furnishings and equipment are included in the B & B price.

Hattersley now resides in San Diego, Calif., where he recently completed a Victorian remodel of the Britt Scripps Inn.

Absorbed in that project, Hattersley said he hasn’t been able to dedicate the time he would like to the Steamboat B & B.

The B & B largely has been successful, as it is popular for weddings and weekend getaways, but there is potential to also market it as a small executive-type retreat, Hattersley said.

Although the property holds abundant potential as a family retreat or home, Hattersley hopes it remains a bed and breakfast.

Hattersley also owns a two-bedroom “bungalow” next to the B & B. It features craftsman-style woodwork and cabinetry. It also includes a large steel garage and shop with alley access and an attached studio apartment.

The B & B, which includes the business name and licenses, is being offered at $1.9 million. The bungalow is $650,000 if sold with the B & B.

For more information, call Downs at Steamboat Village Brokers, 879-7800.