Ken Collins: Trump is threat to America

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Barnum & Bailey Circus will shut down after 150 years. The animals will be fine, maybe better. And the clowns are finding work also. In the new Trump administration, only the scary ones, though.

Give Donald Trump credit. He has found the worst people for almost every cabinet post that could be found.

Rick Perry in energy? A department that he wanted eliminated a few years ago, he had no idea that it included nuclear arms.

Scott Pruitt in the EPA? He's sued it 18 times and closed the Oklahoma office when he was AG. Climate change is a non-starter for him.

Betsy DeVos for education? She's hasn't a clue what a public education is about having herself or her children been nowhere near a public school.

Jeff Sessions as attorney general? I guess David Duke declined, and of course, George Wallace is dead.

Ben Carson for the head of HUD? Well, he does live in a house.

The scariest is Rex Tillerson for secretary of state.  He recently was given the highest medal a citizen could be given — by Vladimir Putin. Vlad's on his speed dial. What could possibly be bad about that? Conflict of interest or compromising information as starters.

Donald Trump still wants the wall and pesos to pay for it. Ain't going to happen. So he'll raise the tariff on Mexican goods. Which, of course, means you and I will pay for it.

The GOP will find the money by dissolving the mortgage payment help millions of lower income people have counted on and repealing the health care of 21 million Americans. And erasing the health care women have avilable to them. And selling unneeded mining rights in our National Parks. And cutting taxes for billionaires. And not paying his fair share.

Since Trump can do more than one thing at a time, he's decided that an investigation into voter fraud is needed. He can't believe he lost the popular vote. He thought that world-wide march on the Jan. 21 was for him.

Not surprising since his mouthpiece, Kellyanne Conway, explained the "alternative facts" approach to the world. George Orwell, in his novel "1984" had it wrong. He thought is was "newspeak."  

In my opinion, when your POTUS communications director is channeling Orwell, you have a serious problem.

Why not top this whole 1930s European theme by shutting down most federal agencies' ability to communicate with the public? Transparency is overrated, despite what the GOP kept yelling at Obama about. Then he abrubtly calls it off and says he never did it.

Trump says our illegal alien infestation — by the way lower than it has been in many years — is a "threat to American sovereignty." No Mr. Trump, and I don't mean that respectfully, when the only country not worried about America is Russia, it is you that is the threat.

Ken Collins

Oak Creek

Comments

Michael Castagnet 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Say what you may about Trump; but, he is following through on the message which got him elected. All the IMPEACH NOW sites, posts, petitions, etc need to recognize that his Executive Orders resonate with the message and his base. As disturbing as it is for me; the America that voted (shame on the 40% who didn't) support his America First, Build A Wall, Anti-Choice, Closed Border, Limited Personal Freedoms & Expression; and, Anti-Refugee platform. He may have massive issues with regards to conflicts of interests, foreign interests in his business, hypocrisy and temperament to name simply a few; but, these were known issues that his base decided were less important that the principles and promise which they supported. This is not "My America"; but, when looking in the mirror, it may be the America that is looking back at me.

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Scott Wedel 1 month, 3 weeks ago

While Trump won the election, not all of his supporters were for all of his policies. Some people voted against Hillary more than they voted for him.

I note that the Republican Colorado congressional delegation including Scott Tipton have released statements trying to split the difference by supporting delaying refugees while not supporting the part that blocks people with green cards or visas from returning. They obviously think that the politics of this issue being a danger to their reelection efforts.

Just tonight Trump fell into the trap by firing the acting Attorney General which crosses a line of the President firing the Attorney General for political reasons. Sure, she was an Obama leftover, but that means she would be gone in a day or two regardless. And White House counsel's office could have easily enough defended his executive order. But firing an AG for political reasons reminds people of Nixon's firing the AG also for political reasons.

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Scott Wedel 1 month, 3 weeks ago

I think Trump is looking like someone more likely to cause a recession that increased economic growth.

If you look at the great companies of the 21st century such as Apple, Google, Facebook, biotech, etc then all of the can relocate as needed. They formed in the USA because of capital formation and the ability to recruit skilled employees from around the world Already, many of India's high tech companies have been formed by people educated and gained experience in the US, but lost their work visas when US made them harder to keep.

These companies probably won't announce it publicly, but I'd bet internal plans are now how to expand overseas in friendly places. Highly prized talent right now would be nuts to move to the US to be technical leaders. Next big thing is probably being formed by people figuring out where to locate it overseas.

Meanwhile, Trump talks about steel pipe as if he doesn't know it is nearly entirely made by robots and US will gain a handful of jobs by starting a trade war while losing far more in other products we don't export. It is so stupid when unemployment is low to be seeking to kill high paying jobs to regain low paying jobs. It would make sense to go to these companies and say these parts of the country are still hurting and you big successful companies need to move a few thousand high paying jobs to these areas. Maybe make that a condition for bringing back some of the billions of overseas profits that are still parked overseas.

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Ken Collins 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Ken, millions Marched all over the world w/o any violence. Doubt they were Trumpers. And the protests continue, non-violently. As they probably will until DT steps over the impeachment line.

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Carl Steidtmann 1 month, 3 weeks ago

You keep using that word 'non-violent'. I don't think it means what you think it means.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3z_jqbLCz0

And we are seeing numerous calls for more violence from the left.

https://grabien.com/file.php?id=157791&searchorder=date

We are told by our betters that the long shroud of fascism is always descending on the right but as you can see in these videos it seems to land increasingly on the left.

If you want more Trump, I can't think of a better way to get more Trump.

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Scott Wedel 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Debbie,

Yeah, no possibility that pendulum will swing back to elect a President with a strong majority of the public vote as happened 4 and 8 years ago.

A President is normally popular at very start of term by taking action on his most popular policies. Gallup has Trump being 8 points more disapprove than approve. That isn't a big deal now, but he has no margin to lose if there is a bit of an economic slowdown which wouldn't be unexpected after 5 years of growth. A President with approval in the 30s% range has his party in Congress running away from him.

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Robert Huron 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Trump slams phone down on Australian PM during their first conversation. What will be next for the thin skinned Treater in Chief? Nuclear War ?

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Ken Mauldin 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Hi Robert - I'm not sure I would trust the source of your information. Mexico claims that the AP lied about Trump suggesting on the call that he would send the US military into Mexico. So, we should probably be a bit skeptical on any information that was leaked related to President Trump's calls with other leaders.

http://www.latimes.com/world/mexico-americas/la-fg-mexico-trump-20170201-story.html

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Robert Huron 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Ken, He admitted doing it. The biggest problem with Trump is that his EGO gets in the way of his thinking and actions. He is extremely thin skinned and extremely disrespectful to people he disagrees with which is why he surrounds himself with yes men. He needs to be told each and everyday how great he is. He is the first President ever to have a Propaganda Minister (Bannon) who he put on the National Security Council and he also has walk in privileges to the Oval Office. This is to make sure only info favorable to him is released. My big problem with him is what I've said for many months and that is the US Nuclear Arsenal is controlled by a mentally impaired person. What will happen when an Ally like Australia or Iran, North Korea pisses him off? I can tell you it will be war and it could be Nuclear. Remember Trump knows nothing about what is like to be in a war. His Father did not serve in WW2, he refused to serve during Vietnam and his children never served in the Gulf. Obviously they were all "Too rich to serve".

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Ken Mauldin 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Hi Robert - Can you provide a source where Trump admitted to hanging up on the Australian PM? The Australian PM says that didn't happen. "the report the president hung up is not correct, the call ended courteously."

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4182724/Donald-Trump-slams-Malcolm-Turnbull-worst-call-ever.html#ixzz4XXgrFxw2

While I have a lot of respect for you, Robert, I think you're 100% wrong about these things. I don't think that Trump is mentally impaired and can't tell you how grateful I am that a large majority of States elected Trump president instead of Hillary Clinton. Despite your fear and loathing of Trump, I suspect that you, your family, this community and our nation will be improved by his service. Time will tell. So far, I think he's done a great job.

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Ken Mauldin 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Hi Rhys - The WaPo is a repeat offender in regard to publishing lies (fake news.) I'm not saying it didn't happen, I'm saying that the outlets publishing it are proven liars and I'd put more faith in a report that comes directly from the Australian PM.

http://www.weeklystandard.com/fake-news-about-planned-parenthood-in-the-washington-post/article/2006383

Since we're talking about Australia, I agree with Trump that accepting almost 2,000 immigrants from Australia with nothing whatsoever in return is a bad deal for America and should be reconsidered.

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Scott Wedel 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Okay, so now Australian puts their military cooperation with the US on the negotiating table so then the US gets something in return. There are currently 400 Australian military advisors in Afghanistan and their navy is participating in shipping lanes protection in the Persian Gulf.

It is a very shortsighted policy to treat friends of the US in terms of what exactly does the US get in every agreement. The deal makes sense in the overall context of what Australia does for the US. If US now wants to make everything a transaction deal then we will cease to have friends around the world trusting us.

It isn't better for US to have Australia say that they will maintain military advisors and naval support for 3 months in return for US taking 2,000 political and religious refugees.

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Ken Mauldin 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Scott - You think accepting complete responsibility for 2,000 refugees in exchange for 3 months of military assistance is a good deal for America? Wow.

It's been so long since we had someone that negotiated on behalf of America that it seems wrong to some people that the US President actually puts America's interests first when negotiating with other nations.

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Brian Kotowski 1 month, 3 weeks ago

"...Mr Turnbull (Aussie PM) returned serve, telling 2GB's Ben Fordham: 'As far as the call is concerned, I’m very disappointed, the report the president hung up is not correct, the call ended courteously.'

A couple of western pols don't hit it off. So nuclear war. That kind of hyperbole (someone less graceful than me might call it an outright lie) and self-righteous histrionics are arguably among the reasons the left presently finds itself in the wilderness.

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Scott Wedel 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Australia PM is disputing that their call ended on a hang up, but not denying that it was a rough conversation.

But Trump is just being stupid to call previous agreements with Australia as being "dumb". You don't tear up an existing deal that is important to your friend. If he wanted to propose specific changes then do so, but he created a political mess for the Australian government. Whether US is a friend is being questioned and resolving their refugee camps is now back as a big political problem. There isn't a better deal available to the Australian government because any changes in terms means US is less of a friend. And Australia has been good at cooperating or even sending troops for US adventures so they have been good friends to the US.

.

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Ken Mauldin 1 month, 3 weeks ago

"There isn't a better deal available to the Australian government..." Perhaps, but getting the best deal for Australia isn't the US President's responsibility.

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Brian Kotowski 1 month, 3 weeks ago

You know the left is off the rails when even Piers Morgan has had enough:

People are literally losing their minds over the mere thought of him sitting in the Oval Office.

A mental failure that is driven, I fear, by sore loser syndrome.

The protestors wanted, and expected, Hillary Clinton to sweep this ghastly man to crushing defeat in the election two months ago and become the first female president.

When it didn’t happen, mainly because Hillary was a terrible candidate who fought a terrible campaign, they were collectively struck down by Post Trump Success Disorder.

This is an awful affliction that causes victims to lose the power of calm, rational thought and instead resort to uncontrollable, unrelenting outbursts of shrieking, screaming, wailing and teeth-gnashing.

Every single thing President Trump now does, says or tweets or is greeted by instant paralysis of perspective.

He is, and must remain, a ‘MONSTER!’

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Eric J. Bowman 1 month, 1 week ago

Sore loser syndrome? Puuuhhleeeze.

Any rational American has to be more than a little concerned about a President who's now in charge of the investigations into his connections to Russia, won't release his tax returns, divest his business holdings into a blind trust, could care less about anti-nepotism laws, is in violation of his lease on the Old Post Office (not that Sessions will do his duty to the American people as our AG, the President has his own legal counsel, on that one), owes $300M to a bank recently fined $600M for laundering Russian money despite sanctions -- while remaining under investigation (also now controlled by President Trump) by the DOJ...

You're exactly right! Nothing to see here!!! Just the bitter taste of sour grapes from those "losers" who expect any President to abide by the Constitution and not be a puppet of Vlad Putin.

What could possibly go wrong?

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Fred Duckels 1 month, 3 weeks ago

This perpetual hissy fit is directed at Trump but look at the condition of the Dramacrats in general. Trump did not cause all the disarray on down the line. This is a clinic in incompetence, forget Trump.

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Eric J. Bowman 1 month, 1 week ago

Have to agree. Debbie Wasserman-Schulz is out as head of the DNC after all the cheating to freeze Bernie out of the nomination came to light, substituting the candidate most likely to defeat Trump, for the candidate least likely. Even after the biggest humiliation in the history of American politics, who's in charge?

Chuck Shumer and Nancy Pelosi? Talk about just not getting it!!! The Dems handed Trump the election on a silver platter, not because of anything to do with Hillary's candidacy, but for anointing Hillary their candidate in the first place. Although there's as yet no evidence this lesson has been learned.

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Scott Wedel 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Blowing up our longstanding friendship with Australia is a big deal for people that think about worldwide stability and alliances. Particularly when absolutely unneeded. Trump could have said that the refugees will have go to through additional vetting. Trump could have said that US accepting these refugees creates some political troubles for him in the US so Australia owes us continued support in Persian Gulf and maybe US wants stronger support in South China Sea issues opposing China's claims. But no, Trump says it is a "dumb" deal and leaves Australian government reeling as what to do next. Reaction in Australia includes questioning their continued military support for the US when US President is unreliable.

Australia exports a lot to China so they are under constant pressure from China to shift their foreign policies to be more friendly to China. So it is really stupid to be creating political troubles for the Australian government, particularly in going back against an existing agreement.

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Ken Mauldin 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Scott - It's an extremely unbalanced deal that takes advantage of the United States and should be renegotiated. Thank goodness Trump was elected to represent America. If this Australia deal is any example of other deals made by Obama, the United States has gone without a strong advocate in international negotiations for a long time.

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Scott Wedel 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Ken,

Well, maybe many Australians think that their military cooperation with the US with a President that breaks agreements is a bad deal for them.

As for Trump's negotiating skills, his NY deals have a pattern of negotiating a contract with government agencies and then violating the spirit of the agreement by using contract ambiguity to end up with better terms. Something like the Iron Horse deal where government ends up buying back what the buyers are supposed to be improving as a public amenity is a classic Trump style move. It is good business to out negotiate government, but it does not translate well to international agreements between countries.

Thus, an analysis is that it isn't worthwhile to do deals with him. So Australia can easily enough decide that there is nothing to negotiate with the US and bring their troops and ships home from Afghanistan and Persian Gulf. They export 8 times more to China than to US so we don't have much economic leverage to make them fall into line.

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Ken Mauldin 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Hi Scott - The Aussies will have to keep the 2,000 immigrants if they can't negotiate a deal with another country to take them. Apparently, Australia doesn't want them and is trying to unload them on another country. Regardless, it's not America's problem.

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Scott Wedel 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Ken,

Yeah, very unlikely that Australia will ever admit those refugees due to numerous promises made by Australian politicians when rescuing these refugees from boats in the open ocean. They will instead make deals with other countries.

These refugees as mostly Iranians which are facing documented religious and political prosecution if they were returned to Iran. It is only 2,000 refugees, many of which are well educated, and is good PR for US that Iran has political and religious persecution.

Meanwhile, Australian PM Turnbull is from the right of center party and this will be a political issue that favors the left of center political party in the next elections. So if Trump's goal is to elect an anti Trump PM then this would be an effective policy.

And Australia has a comparatively large navy a long ways from the US so they are a very useful ally. The US does not want every request of cooperation to get a response of "what is in it for Australia?".

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Fred Duckels 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Scott, How did Trump overlook you for secretary of state? Now you seem to know more than he does on every subject. No other person has stood up to him with accurate predictions until now

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Ken Mauldin 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Maybe China will take them since they're such good friends with the Australians? Although I think a Muslim country would probably be the best fit if the refugees are Muslim. Maybe Saudi Arabia or Qatar? The whole civilized world should impose sanctions on Iran and seize assets until they take their citizens back without persecution. Why should Iran be allowed to act this way while other nations provide for their citizens abroad?

Hopefully, the days of the USA being the default destination for the whole planet's troubled population are over.

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Scott Wedel 1 month, 3 weeks ago

It isn't as if I have some unique bizarre theory about this deal and Australian politics. Republican diplomats from former Presidents are making similar points.

The US is far from the default destination for the whole planet's troubled population. That has been over for decades. US has, for years, taken far less than it's share of refugees from around the world. Most countries in Europe have taken in far more refugees as a percent of population.

Australia spends a higher percentage of GDP for military than nearly all of our allies. They are a country we should be holding up as being an example of the benefits that flow to a country that is our strong ally.

We will see how all this ends up.

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Ken Collins 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Fred, Scott is only one of 300,000,000 Americans that know much more that Trump.

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Brian Kotowski 1 month, 3 weeks ago

She serves her master well, and she will be rewarded.

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Brian Kotowski 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Senate advances DeVos's nomination, setting her up for final vote

"Senators voted 52-48 to advance DeVos’s nomination. No Democrats voted yes.

The vote, which came during a rare Friday session, sets up lawmakers to take a final vote early next week.

Vice President Pence is expected to have to break a 50-50 tie, the first time a vice president will cast the deciding vote on a Cabinet nomination.

Senate rules require an extra 30 hours of debate before senators can confirm DeVos. If Democrats refuse to yield back time and drag out the procedural clock, they could push a final vote until Tuesday."

If not for Harry Reid's deft use of the nuclear option to neuter the opposition, the Trumpster would be shopping for a new nominee. Instead, it looks like DeVos might squeak through. Thanks, Harry. You're a peach.

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Scott Wedel 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Cabinet appointments should never have become partisan. Issue should have been whether person has so many issues that the President's own party cannot support the nominee. If Trump and the Republicans want DeVos then they should get her. If Republicans think that education is so irrelevant that she should be in charge then so be it. Stuff like that should define the next election.

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Tim Keenan 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Not if our republican senator speaks up for the people he's supposed to represent, but I'm not holding my breath. Though I do have to credit him for working with Bennett on those public lands bills.

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Ken Collins 1 month, 3 weeks ago

First of all, it's 1250 refugees, not 2000. For those who think this POTUS is a real world player consider the latest. His Yemen raid that got a Seal killed, 4 more injured. Who was his sounding board on this rash decision? A white supremicist (Bannon) and a real estate tycoon, or is that bafoon (his son-in-law). Boy, I bet Ike wished he had a group like that before D-Day. Imagine what could've happened. Yes, it was planned back in O's time, but he tabled it after a little thought. Much too much to ask of Trump. 13 days and a disaster or embarassment per day. How long can America take this? We'll run out of allies in a couple of months.

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Ken Mauldin 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Thank goodness President Trump is taking the fight directly to ISIS and AQAP. God bless our soldiers, airman, sailors and marines. Thank you for keeping America safe!

"War is hell" - William T. Sherman

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Tim Keenan 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Well, Mattis would have had to greenlight that raid I would imagine. He's the only cabinet pick who actually has a good reputation and is an expert at performing the duties of his position. I've heard many good things from many people -- some of whom have actually worked with him. Not sure what went wrong here.

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Ken Collins 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Ken M--we are in so much more danger now than anytime in the last 10 years from that bafoon. It won't take much for UK, Germ., Canada, Australia to say "You're on your own" Tim K---Trump didn't even find the guts to go to the Situation Room when that fiasco went down. Obama decided it wasn't worth it to try. Debbie M---you apparently think we can do this on our own?
When will the sane Republicans start marching and protesting? When they find out Trump can't deliver to anybody but the .1% and the white supremicists? Too late.

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Ken Mauldin 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Hi Ken C. - We disagree and I think the hysteria is misplaced. BTW - George Wallace was a Democrat.

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Scott Wedel 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Ken,

Yes, part of the history of the Democratic Party was being a party in the South that catered to racist by opposing the Republican Party of Lincoln. That created tensions within the Democratic Party going back to at least FDR trying to keep both Northern and Southern Democrats satisfied despite have diametrically opposing views on civil rights.

That issue was finally resolved in the 60s and 70s when the Democratic Party officially supported civil rights and then purged the party of segregationists. Curiously, the party of Lincoln welcomed them.

As for George Wallace, in his later years he disavowed his racist segregationist past, apologized and became a strong support of civil rights.

BTW, Strom Thurmond and Jesse Helms were originally Democrats, but then became Republicans when the Democratic Party consistently supported civil rights.

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Ken Mauldin 1 month, 3 weeks ago

OK. You think the Democrats purged segregationists? Yet, they kept Robert Byrd and celebrated him by naming every third bridge and four-lane state highway in West Virginia after him.

Who cares what a couple of fringe senators thought about civil rights? You complain that a few Republicans in the 1960's were segregationists, but give many Democrats a complete pass on much worse during the exact same time period. As for more modern times, Democrats of the last 30 years have done far more harm to minorities than any other American institution. Democrats have wrecked countless minority-majority school districts and failed to enforce any semblance of law and order in minority communities.

The claim that Republicans are now, or have ever been, either predominately populated by racists or motivated by racism, is a vicious lie that's easily disproven by the record.

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Scott Wedel 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Ken,

Yes, the Democrats purged their segregationists. Robert Byrd also apologized for his past and became a strong advocate for civil rights.

It was the Republican Party that welcomed the unreformed Strom Thurmond and Jesse Helms.

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Ken Mauldin 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Sure, Scott - The Democrats are so concerned about minority Rights they've consistently driven black communities into desperate ruins for 30 straight years. Every. Single. Inner-city slum in America, infested with violence and crime has been governed by Democrats for decades.

With friends like that, who needs enemies?

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Brian Kotowski 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Obama Pentagon official says anti-Trump military coup now possible

Meanwhile, violence in California. Streets & storefronts set ablaze & destroyed, in a stunning exhibition of hatred, stupidity and evil.

Exactly the same kind of behavior the left warned you to expect from tea partiers (like me); the same people the Plagiarist In Chief compared to terrorists.

Had people like me done any of the above, we all know the fit would have hit the shan.

Lefty COWARDS: you want more Trump? Keep on keeping on, dbags.

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Dan Kuechenmeister 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Ken Collins say "Ben Carson for head of HUD? Well he does live in a house." Just thinking what the reaction would be from the left if a non liberal progressive had made a similar statement about the most recent ex POTUS. I am pretty sure the R word would be front an center.

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Chris Hadlock 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Or Texas, How did that Jade Helm invasion go again?

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Scott Wedel 1 month, 3 weeks ago

Chris,

The MSM failed to report on that just like they covered up the Bowling Green massacre.

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mary walker 1 month, 2 weeks ago

This just in - a dual American/Somali citizen was just elected President of Somalia. But he shouldn't be allowed entry to the U.S., really???

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Ken Mauldin 1 month, 2 weeks ago

Hi Mary - All US citizens, including the new President of Somalia, may enter the US anytime they want. President Trump's EO has no impact on US citizens entering the United States.

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mary walker 1 month, 2 weeks ago

Just trying to point out the irony of who the people of Somalia, a so-called "failed" state, have elected as their President right now. Overstatement is a hallmark of rhetoric. And I know very well what having an American passport means. And as for lack of grammar in all these posts, don't get me started.

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Eric Morris 1 month, 2 weeks ago

KSM: US bipartisan foreign policy is threat to 'murica

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-02-09/911-mastermind’s-letter-obama-here’s-why-we-attacked-america

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Eric J. Bowman 1 month, 1 week ago

"The scariest is Rex Tillerson for secretary of state. He recently was given the highest medal a citizen could be given — by Vladimir Putin. Vlad's on his speed dial. What could possibly be bad about that? Conflict of interest or compromising information as starters."

I'm giving Tillerson the benefit of the doubt, and reserving judgment. For starters, he's about the only cabinet appointee (despite the example being set by Trump) who divested his holdings and so on and so forth, thus actually setting the best ethical example of anyone in the new administration. Plus he's disagreed publicly with Trump on a couple of issues since being confirmed, so this is HARDLY surprising:

"When Trump decided over a dinner to approve a special forces counter-terrorist raid in Yemen, there was no one from the state department present who would normally have highlighted the dangers of civilian casualties from such operations for wider US interests in the region."

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/feb/16/rex-tillerson-state-department-sidelined-by-white-house

Was anyone at State "in the loop" when Trump handled a Korean missile test over dinner? Tillerson's being set up to fail. I'm not a big Elliot Abrams fan to say the least, but Trump's reason for micromanaging Tillerson's choice of deputy is absurdly weak (i.e. not sycophantic enough).

Tillerson may be the best Secretary of State we never had. How can we know, if he isn't allowed to do his job, by the President whose pleasure he serves at? Instead, we have Miller and Bannon making foreign-relations decisions purely based on ideology, which is even WORSE than an ex-Exxon CEO heading up a bureaucracy of career professionals who actually know what's up, imo.

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Eric J. Bowman 1 month, 1 week ago

In my experience, you just never know how someone's going to handle a Presidential appointment. Heck, ask Obama about Comey... or Reagan's ghost about O'Connor. Is Rex Tillerson professional enough to tailor his knowledge, experience, and expertise to serving We the People as opposed to the shareholders of a public corporation? I think yes, he's just the sort of non-ideological professional who's capable of rising to the responsibilities of his office. I also feel that way about Ryan Zinke -- these guys may turn out to be good choices for the nation.

Neil Gorsuch... maybe in a different reality, but not for a "stolen seat." If the GOP's (alleged) reasoning to not hold hearings on Merrick Garland was that Obama didn't have "enough time left in office" then heck yeah, the Democrats need to filibuster Gorsuch as a matter of principle. How much time before Trump has to be impeached even by a Republican majority, if there's fire causing all the smoke?

http://observer.com/2017/02/donald-trump-administration-mike-flynn-russian-embassy/

Our intelligence agencies are leaking like sieves right now. Tillerson's not that close to the action, but someone in Trump's inner circle, is seriously considered to be a Russian mole by our intelligence agencies? This includes the FBI, who were "in the bag" for Trump, and the CIA who likewise wanted Hillary? Apparently, they didn't (just) mean Flynn.

How long before even the GOP's had enough of Trump to impeach him, because like Truman said, the buck's gotta stop at the top? Even Trump's cellphone is a threat to national security. Frankly, I don't think he'll be in the Oval Office for even the year the GOP froze out Garland. If Mike Pence wants to go with Gorsuch, so be it, but the biggest fault I can find with him is he's TRUMP's nominee.

Which is really the only reason the GOP didn't want Garland -- he was OBAMA's nominee. Turnabout is fair play, let Pence decide, hopefully sooner rather than later. No, I'm not a big Pence fan either, but I'm already wistful for the non-scandalous eight years we got from Obama (aside from the manufactured Benghazi fracas, standard GOP vs. Clinton crap most of the country's fed up enough with for a minority of us to have voted for Trump in the first place).

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Dan Shores 1 month ago

Here's how Trumps first month is going. No, he's doing a fantastic job. You bought it!!!

  1. He called Hillary Clinton a crook. You bought it. Then he paid $25 million to settle a fraud lawsuit.

  2. He said he'd release his tax returns, eventually. You bought it. He hasn't, and says he never will.

  3. He said he'd divest himself from his financial empire, to avoid any conflicts of interest. You bought it. He is still heavily involved in his businesses, manipulates the stock market on a daily basis, and has more conflicts of interest than can even be counted.

  4. He said Clinton was in the pockets of Goldman Sachs, and would do whatever they said. You bought it. He then proceeded to put half a dozen Goldman Sachs executives in positions of power in his administration.

  5. He said he'd surround himself with all the best and smartest people. You bought it. He nominated theocratic loon Mike Pence for Vice President. A white supremacist named Steve Bannon is his most trusted confidant. Dr. Ben Carson, the world's greatest idiot savant brain surgeon, is in charge of HUD. Russian quisling Rex Tillerson is Secretary of State.

  6. He said he'd be his own man, beholden to no one. You bought it. He then appointed Betsy DeVos as Secretary of Education, whose only "qualifications" were the massive amounts of cash she donated to his campaign.

  7. He said he would "drain the swamp" of Washington insiders. You bought it. He then admitted that was just a corny slogan he said to fire up the rubes during the rallies, and that he didn't mean it.

  8. He said he knew more about strategy and terrorism than the Generals did. You bought it. He promptly gave the green light to a disastrous raid in Yemen- even though all his Generals said it would be a terrible idea. This raid resulted in the deaths of a Navy SEAL, an 8-year old American girl, and numerous civilians. The actual target of the raid escaped, and no useful intel was gained.

  9. He said Hillary Clinton couldn't be counted on in times of crisis. You bought it. He didn't even bother overseeing that raid in Yemen; and instead spent the time hate-tweeting the New York Times, and sleeping.

  10. He called CNN, the Washington Post and the New York Times "fake news" and said they were his enemy. You bought it. He now gets all his information from Breitbart, Gateway Pundit, and InfoWars.

  11. He called Barack Obama "the vacationer-in-Chief" and accused him of playing more rounds of golf than Tiger Woods. He promised to never be the kind of president who took cushy vacations on the taxpayer's dime, not when there was so much important work to be done. You bought it. He took his first vacation after 11 days in office. On the taxpayer's dime. And went golfing.

And that's just the first month.

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