Workout enthusiasts ride fitness bikes at Old Town Hot Springs. Local trainers say one of the keys to keeping a New Year’s workout resolution is to not overdo the routine.

Shannon Lukens/courtesy

Workout enthusiasts ride fitness bikes at Old Town Hot Springs. Local trainers say one of the keys to keeping a New Year’s workout resolution is to not overdo the routine.

Local trainers offer advice for sticking to New Year's fitness resolutions

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— Tell Jim Gregoire you don't have the time to work out, and he'll go grab a blank sheet of paper.

He then will jot down a series of numbers.

There are 168 hours in the week.

Most people sleep through about 56 of them, and if you're lucky, you'll be working for another 40.

“That leaves 72 hours of discretionary time,” Gregoire says as he turns the paper towards you.

The Anytime Fitness trainer calls it “Jim's formula,” and it's one of the tools he uses this time of year to help convince people they easily can fit in three 30-minute workouts into their week and still have plenty of time to walk the dog, watch TV and relax.

“The most important thing is to put it in your mindset that this is something you're going to do for the rest of your life,” he said about getting into shape.

January is the month in which health clubs across the country see a big spike in new members, many of whom are embarking on a New Year's resolution to get fit.

And February is the time when a sizable number of these people start trailing off.

Gregoire, in the fitness business now for more than 40 years, said he's seen some research that shows 30 to 40 percent of the people who start a workout routine in the New Year give it up before February is over.

“Motivation is hard,” he said. “It's not a pill you can take.”

So he goes back to stress that a positive mindset is key to sticking with the routine.

“No matter what is happening, life is going to get in the way,” he said.

Gregoire and other local trainers have some advice for people who want the power to make a New Year's resolution more than a two-month stint.

Marietta Roberts said most resolutions end because people start out too ambitiously.

“They start out doing too much,” the fitness director at Old Town Hot Springs said. “They want to work out an hour and a half each day for five days a week. But they're going to burn out immediately."

She said her first tip is to start out slowly, working out for 30 minutes three times each week.

She also recommends doing two 30-minute sessions per week and taking up a class at the hot springs.

“If you stick with it for two weeks, it gets easier,” she said.

Roberts said finding a workout buddy also will help turn resolutions into a more permanent fixture.

And what about people who are intimidated by the gyms in a community that is known for being so active?

Gregoire has an answer for that, too.

“Everybody you see in the gym had a first time here, and a second time and a third time,” he said.

To reach Scott Franz, call 970-871-4210, email scottfranz@SteamboatToday.com or follow him on Twitter @ScottFranz10

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