Dave Moloney: ‘Bipartisan’ representation

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Throughout the past month or so, our current state representative has been meeting with constituents and providing commentary to the local paper. I have read the articles and attended two of these recent meetings — one with the Routt County Board of Commissioners and one with the Steamboat Springs Board of Realtors. In both of these meetings, Rep. Diane Mitsch Bush touted her bipartisan achievements and her effectiveness as a legislator. I have to take exception with the picture that Mitsch Bush is painting of her “legislative accomplishments.”

Sure, she got bipartisan support for her Colorado Avalanche Information Center and oil spill reporting bills. Those aren’t overly controversial. The funny thing is that not once did she mention her extremely partisan votes to raise utility costs for rural Coloradans; her support of gun laws that have done nothing to make us safer and have driven jobs from Colorado; or her co-sponsorship of Senate Bill 13-213, which would have led to the largest tax increase in Colorado history had Amendment 66 not been rejected by an overwhelming majority of Colorado voters last fall. 

The reality is that there are partisan issues that affect each of us here in House District 26, issues that affect our constitutional rights and freedoms, our jobs and economy and our quality of life. Rep. Mitsch Busch has a clear voting record of supporting legislation that increases the size of government, attacks our freedom, raises our taxes and hurts the Colorado economy. 

It isn’t hard to understand why she avoids talking about these “accomplishments” when she is back home in our district. But don’t just take my word for it. The Colorado Union of Taxpayers gave Diane a rating of 9.8 out of 100 based on her record regarding taxes. PrinciplesofLiberty.

org gave her an F rating based on her stance on issues related to fiscal responsibility, protection of property rights, free markets and individual liberties.

We need a representative who will fight for us down in Denver. Unfortunately, what we have right now is someone who seems more interested in supporting the goals of special interest groups than those of her constituents.

Dave Moloney

steamboat springs

Comments

Fred Duckels 6 months, 3 weeks ago

Here we sit nestled with Wyo. and Utah both leading the nation in conservative ideals and find that we are being gerrymandered and joined by Eagle County for voting purposes. This will make DMB the Nancy Pelosi of the Ponderosa. Dianne's outreach seems mostly to attract votes rather than listening, I feel confident that I could pencil her voting record in before the legislative session starts.

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Pat West 6 months, 3 weeks ago

Luckily the fringe minority that dominates this forum are just that, fringe, and minority.

Thanks Diane for your service to the majority of voters in Routt and Eagle counties.

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Scott Wedel 6 months, 3 weeks ago

I see a more fear mongering from the right than any hint of better policies.

SB-252 on increasing rural renewable to 20% has a 2% annual cap on rate increases. Meanwhile Front Range under Xcel has a 30% goal. It hardly seems unfair and it makes no sense to say reaching 20% will cost rural Colorado far more than reaching 30% will cost the Front Range. YVEA has said that since they get electricity from Xcel that this bill will not impact us. The head of one of the affected rural utilities, Tri-State, is a climate change denier being quoted that there is no difference between 200 ppm or 400 ppm of atmospheric CO2. This issue is probably more likely to elect than defeat DMB in this district.

And saying an activist Republican group gave her a F is hardly convincing. Principleofliberty.org gave Fs to EVERY Democrat legislator in Colorado. They gave As or Bs to less than half of the Republicans. If Dave Moloney is suggesting his goal is to get an A from that group then the election will be a cakewalk for DMB.

I believe Dave Moloney to be an intelligent reasonable person. I don't see how this sort of letter advances his campaign.

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John Weibel 6 months, 3 weeks ago

The largest factor on our climate is the sun. One can correlate colder times on the earth to low sunspot numbers. http://solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov/images/Zurich_Color_Small.jpg

This solar cycle is very weak and the Great Lakes are freezing over, while at the peak of the 11 year cycle.

Do some research on the correlations and throw out the box walk outside the room it was in and think for yourselves.

"It is easier to fool someone than convince them they have been fooled". Mark Twain.

You want to do something about it then convince "CON"gress to stop subsidizing industrial ag. We can sequester enough carbon in our soils by changing ag practices, yet the system would have a hard time changing. Doing that would help fix most of the problems we face today.

yeomansconcepts.com.au/index.htm

If the opposite of pro is con then is progress better achieved with less legislation from congress.

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John Weibel 6 months, 3 weeks ago

By the way Scott, I do not know wether it is simply more energized areas of space which help to cause the warming and cause the sunspots, if the sun has a cycle which makes more less spots or something else does, though there is a very strong correlation between the temps on the third rock from the sun and the number of sunspots.

I am only speculating just as scientists are theorizing as they have not input all of the data (what is going on in space) into their models. There may be some, those who write the famers almanac, that may have some understanding of what is going on as they stated that this was going to be a very cold winter. I do not know, but I do know that historically lower sunspots (for the whole 11 year cycle) equal lower temps here. You then have take into account the thermal mass of the earth and atmosphere, which help to smooth out what would be wild temperature swings.

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jerry carlton 6 months, 3 weeks ago

Oz is right. Liberals have taken over the country and northwest Colorado. We are all doomed.

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Scott Wedel 6 months, 3 weeks ago

This goes to show that a more interesting letter to the editor from Dave Moloney would be his views on global climate change and what, if any, policies should be adopted by Colorado.

Considering the sort of deniers of science who call themselves conservatives, Dave Moloney might want to say whether he believes in creationism or accepts the science of evolution.

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Harvey Lyon 6 months, 3 weeks ago

Scott,

Regarding last year's 252....I wished to talk with DMB last year about it. Showed up early to one of her "meets". She lied to me 5 times in less than two minutes. Told me folks told her stuff that, when I talked to them the next day, they didn't.

Ultimately the bill was stripped of any "enforcement" provisions by the Governor. So its kind of "we'd like to have" advisement law.

When talking Xcel vs rural electrics one needs to understand the number of folks per mile of distribution. Its quite easy to distribute twice the generation costs when one has 1500 customers per mile of distribution vs 2 or 3 customers per mile in rural areas.

Regarding DMB, other than she lied to me and I firmly be that good programs will be self evident, she's quite passionate about what she believes. What she doesn't grasp is that many of us believe we can get along fine without Government when it deals with social issues. We'd prefer she focus on maintaining what we have, good education, good roads, etc.

Her gun initiatives are meaningless.....what is it, 15 folks turned down and some $5 million in new "fees" given to the Government?

DMB is a social activist who is strong on socialogy and weak on history. She would be quite comfortable in the Marxist-Lenninism of the 1930's. While its a nice pipe dream.....utopia....."giving things" to humans has never worked......give them one and they want two, like any dog you've owned. And Scott.......give them enough and they'll want what you have.....LOL

Harv

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jerry carlton 6 months, 3 weeks ago

John It does not make make me love the fact that the inmates are now running the asylum.

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john bailey 6 months, 3 weeks ago

"like any dog you've owned" jejeje , perfect Harv...... Jerry , they'll burn it down and we'll have to go from there. i'll start with free hula lessons. ~;0)

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Fred Duckels 6 months, 2 weeks ago

Scott, The renewal goals make the proponents feel good but I predict that they will never be met. Australia is turning their backs on this political movement and in Europe, Spain, England and Germany are all questioning their blind loyalty to unproven computer models. Obama has had the same experience with his religion, Obamacare and now it seems that he will delay it until he is out of office. Our emotional half has had much success in winning elections but beyond that point the lights are on but it seems that nobody is home.

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John Weibel 6 months, 2 weeks ago

Scott,

Deniers of science? Maybe it is that people are questioning the faith that has been put in the need to tax carbon emissions. That is what the scientific method is supposed to do remove FAITH from objective reasoning. The faith here is that CO2 emissions are what is causing the temps to rise. Maybe external variables are what is causing the temperatures to rise.

If both Saturn, Jupiter and the Earth are aligned on one side of the sun the gravitational forces of those gas giants will pull the earth further from the sun, reducing the amount of energy that arrives here.

There are so many possibilities out there that our not of this world and to put blind faith in any THEORY on why it is happening is just not sound.

Now as far as sequestering carbon in the soil, that needs to happen so that we are not so subject to droughts and flooding as one pound of carbon in the soil holds three pounds of water. The more compact the soil is the faster the water runs over it and the less holding capacity it has. From an agricultural standpoint, we need to increase those level or we are going to face massive food problems in the future (if not already).

Simply phasing out those grain subsidies in the farm bill, moving to a tax system that rewards employers for putting people to work as opposed to taxing employers for their employees would go a long way to fixing many of the problems we face in this world.

Unfortunately, we live in a world that is simply an echo chamber where we tune out messages which do not align with our world views and seek out those which reinforce our opinions. Many times that interferes with sound policy and decision making. Mitsch-Busch has shown to me that she will simply listen to staffers and those who agree with her general world view and not those with differing views from those she has been indoctrinated with. We really need to get people into office who actually have zero desire to be in office.

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Scott Wedel 6 months, 2 weeks ago

Thanks for proving my point. Does candidate Dave Moloney stand with the views of those above, or not?

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John Weibel 6 months, 2 weeks ago

Therein lies the problem, the inability to actually listen to people with views that do not conform to ones own. Unfortunately, whomever is running for office in this local has limited ability to extract carbon from the atmosphere through any proposed legislation.

The quickest most effective way to do so is to undo the farm bill and eliminate the grain subsidies. However, that will have negative impacts on the fertilizer industry, the tractor industry, etc.. Returning to a more regional food model is the most effective way to extract carbon from the system. Utilizing the Yeomans plow and a more diverse agricultural system than is currently used.

These are changes that a local legislator can not enact. Wether CO2 is the ultimate cause of warming cyclical factors or some other man made chemical, the most effective way to deal with it is to get the government out of its position of intervention to make the world better, ie ending ag subsidies. This eliminates a lot of pollution (the dead zones in our oceans because of algae blooms, improves our health care as food starts to become nutrient dense and not depleted as crop rotation is used not mono culture, it puts more people to work as it is labor intensive (the need to provide incentives to hiring people as opposed to disincentives through taxation) and a myriad of other factors.

Unfortunately, the government is not the solution and really is the problem in this case.

Go read up on the Yeomans plow information. Abe Collins with Carbon farmers of America has used the system in conjunction with high density rotational grazing to take lands that allowed rainfall to infiltrate at one inch per hour to 18 in about ten years. They build topsoil very quickly with these systems. That topsoil is the extraction of carbon from the atmosphere. Unfortunately the government intervention has skewed the natural market forces and pushed them to a model which is completely unsustainable. Removing the invisible hand of government which has pushed ag to the current system, would do wonders for all of the worlds ills.

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John Weibel 6 months, 2 weeks ago

Here Scott just so you understand that scientific observation has correlated the little ice age with a decline in sunspot numbers.

So maybe there is just a little science in there that corresponds to heating and cooling of the third rock from the sun by other causes than co2 emissions.

Have not read your reply as I need sleep deali g w a cold.

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Scott Wedel 6 months, 2 weeks ago

Well, that chart of sunspot activity doesn't appear to correlate well to temperature changes over the last 100 years.

Regardless, a chart showing a correlation is hardly scientific proof. That just suggests something to investigate to seek if there is a link. For the past 50 years we have extremely accurate solar radiation numbers from satellites and it seems pretty well established from varied, peer reviewed studies that for the past 50 years that solar radiation has varied too little to explain temperature changes.

Likewise, the Yeomans plow appears to lack scientific data on having close to the promised impact. I found one study where they did it to part of a farm under the direction of an expert in the practice and not the other part and, so far, they found no significant difference. I didn't find any other controlled studies.

But the point I was trying to make is that candidate Dave Moloney writes a letter advocating bi-partisanship and quotes a partisan group that gave every Democratic member of the state legislature an F. If that is Dave Moloney's style of bi-partisanship then it appears that, to him, it means that everyone else should agree with him.

Seems to me that if he wants to wear a mantle of bi-partisanship then he should be willing to describe his views on global climate change and whether those views lead him to advocate any policies.

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Dan Shores 6 months, 2 weeks ago

Scott thanks for being the voice of reason here. I couldn't agree more with what you are saying. I too would be very interested to hear Dave's views on science and whether or not he believes in evolution, if he believes that the earth is only 6,000 years old, or if he believes that evolution and the big bang theory are "lies straight from the pit of hell" as at least one member of his party has said.. Oh but it is so much easier to just deny facts and create a make believe word that fits your pre-concieved notions. After all, it's the republican way.

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Dan Shores 6 months, 2 weeks ago

Dave, if you want more representation in state government, what you should do is provide a candidate who has a message that resonates with the electorate and can get elected to office. If your party doesn't change their messaging and brand, it is doubtful they their level of representation will increase but will likely decrease. Stop denying science, and stop focusing on social issues, alienating minorities, women, the elderly, the poor and the disadvantaged, and stop trying to insist they we all become Christians and you'll have a much better chance. Sick to fact based arguments and realistic plans for the future that will benefit all, not just the wealthy, and you will at least have a shot, in my view.

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John Weibel 6 months, 2 weeks ago

Have a conversation with Abe Collins of Carbon Farmers of America. He met with researchers in Canada to put together a study on the subject. They asked who was going to pay for the study, and as there is not a real return, the desire to do the study went away as no corporations stood to profit from it.

He also stated that most of the current approaches to paying for Carbon sequestration fail to actually quantify how much was being extracted above and beyond what naturally would occur.

Come out this summer well GPS sites that we use to subsoil tiller and come back in three years and quantify how much deeper the root mass is getting beyond the 3-4 inches because it hits a compact clay which it can not get beneath.

As far as the sunspot chart, it actually matches up fairly well with the last 50-60 years, in that the temperatures started rising in the late seventies went up rapidly and now that the solar cycle, whatever is causing the sunspot activity, is abating temperatures are falling. Thus the 100 year snow in Cairo, the great lakes at ice level not seen in decades, the Arctic ships getting stuck in passageways which were supposed to be open because of global warming.

So while you are enthralled with the theories behind global warming, they are simply that theories. Really go ahead and tax carbon emissions as I plan on quantifying the carbon in my soil annually, leaving a parcel alone to have a baseline from which I can quantify the sequestered carbon on my lands.

You still to fail to address the real change that should take place, in eliminating government intervention which has led to massive losses in topsoil (carbon that is no longer sequestered). That is the upmost problem that needs addressed. Addressing that one issue would reduce dead zones in our oceans, reduce energy consumed in ag, as the tractor based version uses too much of our energy, etc..

Unfortunately our indoctrination system, oops meant education, makes people view systems from one variable at a time and that fails in complex systems.

Go ahead and tax carbon, I hope to profit from that happening on the open market if it comes to pass. I could care less, as I am trying to leave the world a better place than I found it and that includes building our topsoils so that future generations can live on the third rock from the sun.

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John Weibel 6 months, 2 weeks ago

One last question Scott, the numbers of sunspots do not appear to be greater in the last hundred years than before on that chart? In addition, the thermal mass of this rock we live on, is going to hold the heat and dissipate it at an average rate. The 11 year cycle is what you are looking for as the peak tells how active the sun is wether on its own or something in interstellar space is causing the increased activity - more energy in space more active sun - more energy in space more that bombards the earth and helps to heat it.

That black line in there is the average and is certainly on the rise in the last 100 years.

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John Weibel 6 months, 2 weeks ago

Laying here sick in bed mustering up the energy to feed again.

Hypothetically, as I am not sure how they are calibrated, the satellites measurements of energy coming from the sun, might be baselined for the ambient energy reaching us when the satellite is in the earths shadow. So if there is more ambient energy in interstellar space, because of our solar systems orbit within the milky way, that energy is negated when simply measuring the energy being emitted by the sun. That extra energy, then might excite the sun and cause the sun spots.

It is all strictly hypothetical, as are the computer models which are being put together for the earths warming -- which are not working out as they thought they would.

Getting carbon out of the atmosphere and into soil has a far greater importance, in the feeding of the planet, making it less prone to droughts and flooding.

But the first correction for that problem is the farm bill - which has pushed subsistence farmers off their lands in Mexico and other countries - in addition to other problems. It is about corporate control of the system.

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