Tyler Goodman: The vision of a bike town

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Ski Town USA is firmly rooted into Steamboat’s culture with many memories of true visionaries. Community members like Carl Howelsen and Buddy Werner left an incredible mark as they showed us how to take advantage of one of the Yampa Valley’s many perks. The skiing culture they created gave us many things including the necessity to find something else to occupy our time the other six months of the year.

Each year, the days of early spring start getting longer and the temperatures steadily increase until before too long the drips of snow melt become a very familiar sound. The steams and creeks overflow to only retreat again just a few short weeks later. The joyous memories of the ski season slowly wane with thoughts of green foliage, colorful wildflowers and the approach of summer adventures

With the warming days as invitations for us to explore the fresh air, complete with sights and sounds, the time of year brings true joy to any heart. That’s when our Ski Town culture morphs into something that only those of us lucky enough to spend some time here really, truly understand. The influence of people like Kent Eriksen and Jim Meyers take root. It’s when our heritage and identity as Bike Town USA becomes apparent.

Somewhere between the picturesque rolling hills along winding, the seemingly deserted county roads, the mountain single track offering expansive vistas accessible with only enough effort any style of rider is willing to satisfy, the exciting, adrenaline-fulfilling BMX track, jump lines and growing downhill park and the delightfully improved multi-use trail winding along a charming river through a little town that has just about everything else to offer a summer enthusiast, we find something that many believe and know to be a lot more than just another little ski town scene.

The thing about Bike Town culture is that it goes beyond two wheels. It’s a way of life that says, ‘it’s alright if it takes a little longer to get there, we’ll enjoy the journey and take in what this beautiful place has to offer.’ It’s picking a path through our short lives that may not be the quickest or easiest but is certainly the most fun.

Sure, one could go somewhere else to find the very best of this, or the very best of that, but where can we find another place that could offer us what we have right here close by? In Steamboat, we’ve got something of everything and it’s all pretty darn good. In fact, most other places wouldn’t hesitate to trade for any one of our many amenities.

This is what it means to be a Bike Town. People are brought together not only by their chosen mode of transportation but also by the way in which they enjoy themselves. It doesn’t always have to involve handlebars and a pair of pedals. Nevertheless, in those settings where it doesn’t, we’re all still seeking the same things: a good time with friends and family, a great way to stay in shape or a way to pass just another weekday evening after work with the sensation of being outside with a warm breeze and maybe a few giggles along the way.

Last fall, voters of our humble town made a decision to make one of the most significant investments in our future that, with time, will rank among those that built ski jumps and constructed ski lifts. It’s important to remember that for the time being skiing is becoming an art form fewer and fewer people are learning and taking part in. In a world that’s faced with challenges that force us to think about how we move around, many more people are choosing an invention that offers no emissions when you use it while providing a healthier lifestyle with fun and enjoyment for the whole family.

Our direction as a place to have fun during the summer is clear, and we have an incredible future in front of us.

Tyler Goodman is executive director of Bike Town USA.

Comments

Scott Ford 3 weeks ago

Tyler –

You may have missed your calling. You have mastered the “Art of Description”. This is no longer simply a column about biking it likely meets the definition of literature. You made description an active part of the story.

Who knows you may be the next William Faulkner. He was known for his ability to use elaborate and lengthy descriptions to paint a meticulous picture in the reader’s mind. You have done that.

Keep up the good work!

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Pat West 2 weeks, 6 days ago

A bike lane on US-40 (walton pond to 3rd, and 13th to sleepy bear)would go a long way toward proveing we are a bike town. I hope that our elected leaders have made it clear to C-DOT that all upgrades to roadways in Steamboat should include bikes.

Kremmling now has gone to one lane through their town, and added a great bike lane. If we want to show our visitors that Bike Town USA is more than a marketing plan, we need actions to support the claim, not just mountain bike trails and ads, but lanes on major roads to support cycling as transportation. I will be disappointed if the construction on US-40 ends without lanes for cyclists, and question if we are a bike town, or just part of a marketing plan.

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Kieran O'Halloran 2 weeks, 6 days ago

US-40 has an 8' wide asphalt shoulder from 131 till Snowbowl almost entire way (not through downtown nor across from Fart Park to name a few sections). Not sure we need a dedicated bike lane, but I do not bike. Is that not enough?

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Scott Wedel 2 weeks, 6 days ago

The big gap in local bike paths is through downtown from 3rd to 12th.

Lincoln has no room for bike lanes.

The core trail is too much of a pedestrian path to be safely used for bicyclists wishing to get somewhere in a reasonable time.

Oak St could could be tweaked to be a summer bike boulevard via a couple of mid-block closures to through car traffic and removing a couple of east/west stop signs.

That is the sort of thing that is routine is real Bike Towns.

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Pat West 2 weeks, 6 days ago

My main problem is not the 8ft shoulders, but the intersections where cars use the shoulder as a turn lane, and bikes are left exposed. Shoulders are not turn lanes, and should not be used as such. Turn lanes should be installed to curb this action, and lanes for safe passage for cyclists should be clearly marked.

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Matt Charity 2 weeks, 6 days ago

Bike Town USA is without a doubt divisive in this community. It is an ill-conceived claim to go chasing and is devoid of all good sense and judgement. The force of good marketing cannot create something to fit a name. Ski Town USA, yes, the name was arrived at- everyone gets it! It snows here, we have the terrain and climate to ski. Cycling is nothing new, it has culture in its ways and a long history. A glaring example, for many cyclists here in Steamboat, of the 'Bike Town USA' organisations clueless take on creating 'cycling culture' will soon be there for all to see on our roads, in the form of a new road signage campaign that they have backed. The signage, an attempt to show good will to the motorist, whilst further greying and ignoring the basic rights and laws that govern cycling. Furthermore, building trails in and around our towns vast expanse of open space does not equate to creating cycling culture. It certainly would help to know and understand the sport/activity/mode of transportation that you seek to guide. Try communicating something that is not directly expressed- see how that plays out for a while, it could remove the need for constant 'persuasion' from the marketing plan!

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Matt Charity 2 weeks, 6 days ago

Bike Town USA is without a doubt divisive in this community. It is an ill-conceived claim to go chasing and is devoid of all good sense and judgement. The force of good marketing cannot create something to fit a name. Ski Town USA, yes, the name was arrived at- everyone gets it! It snows here, we have the terrain and climate to ski. Cycling is nothing new, it has culture in its ways and a long history. A glaring example, for many cyclists here in Steamboat, of the 'Bike Town USA' organisations clueless take on creating 'cycling culture' will soon be there for all to see on our roads, in the form of a new road signage campaign that they have backed. The signage, an attempt to show good will to the motorist, whilst further greying and ignoring the basic rights and laws that govern cycling. Furthermore, building trails in and around our towns vast expanse of open space does not equate to creating cycling culture. It certainly would help to know and understand the sport/activity/mode of transportation that you seek to guide. Try communicating something that is not directly expressed- see how that plays out for a while, it could remove the need for constant 'persuasion' from the marketing plan!

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Eric Meyer 2 weeks, 6 days ago

The Bike Town USA Initiative & Routt County Riders (RCR) are not the same group. Sometimes things align and overlap and sometimes they do not. There should be much better clarity on which group is doing what.

In respect to the signage: The emails and photos Routt County Riders is receiving clearly show cyclists not obeying the laws. I would be happy to discuss this more if you want to contact me through RCR at rcriders@routtcountyriders.org. If you do not like the way RCR is trying to educate cyclists, please share some of your ideas and try to be a part of the solution.

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Matt Charity 2 weeks, 6 days ago

Bike Town USA is without a doubt divisive in this community. It is an ill-conceived claim to go chasing and is devoid of all good sense and judgement. The force of good marketing cannot create something to fit a name. Ski Town USA, yes, the name was arrived at- everyone gets it! It snows here, we have the terrain and climate to ski. Cycling is nothing new, it has culture in its ways and a long history. A glaring example, for many cyclists here in Steamboat, of the 'Bike Town USA' organisations clueless take on creating 'cycling culture' will soon be there for all to see on our roads, in the form of a new road signage campaign that they have backed. The signage, an attempt to show good will to the motorist, whilst further greying and ignoring the basic rights and laws that govern cycling. Furthermore, building trails in and around our towns vast expanse of open space does not equate to creating cycling culture. It certainly would help to know and understand the sport/activity/mode of transportation that you seek to guide. Try communicating something that is not directly expressed- see how that plays out for a while, it could remove the need for constant 'persuasion' from the marketing plan!

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Jim Kelley 2 weeks, 6 days ago

I fall somewhere in between with this statement.

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Matt Charity 2 weeks, 6 days ago

I see what you did there Jim! Newbie poster, I now know for next time, hit Go once!

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Scott Wedel 2 weeks, 6 days ago

Ski Town USA was a title earned and a recognition of local dedication to skiing. The HS band has XC skis for instance.

Bike Town USA was a label bought for marketing purposes. No one would spontaneously describe SB as a leading "bike town". Unlike a real Bike Town, biking is the not the easy and effective method of getting around in SB. We don't have bike paths that are shortcuts or bike boulevards closed to through traffic or even consistent painted bike paths. City routinely constructs streets too narrow to have bike paths.

Maybe the trail building program will inspire people to some day say SB is a "Trails Town". Though, SB will probably claim and promote that label far before it is earned.

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Matt Charity 2 weeks, 6 days ago

Eric, discussion has been had, concerns have been voiced and at the meetings where RCR were not present, solutions have been put forth. Both RCR and BikeTown Facebook pages have promoted the creation of the signage.

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Eric Meyer 2 weeks, 6 days ago

RCR has representation at all the Multi-modal meetings and is aware you voiced concerns to those making this signage happen. I guess I am just surprised to still hear negative comments coming from you regarding the signage as it sounded like concerns were addressed as best they could be. Multi-modal, RCR, BTUSA, Routt County and likely a few others (you included) have helped with the creation of the signage but really when it comes down to it, it takes a couple motivated individuals to get anything done. An RCR board member and an extremely generous supporter have put a ton of time into the signage all because a small but very visible percentage of cyclists that are clearly uneducated or just feel they can disregard the laws. It sounds like you are a passonate and frequent road user and your help in this education process with other cyclists you see would be appreciated as it will benefit all responsible cyclists.

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Matt Charity 2 weeks, 6 days ago

Regardless of how much time and support individual members of your group put in, be accurate with what you put out there. When comments and suggestions are made directly to you be accountable and communicate. Signs being placed on the side of the road stating, 'ride friendly' and some of the comments and opinions given in spoke talk by your President as information have grabbed mine and other cyclists in towns attention. I'm not sure Eric, that RCR knows its role. Acting on photographs and emails from disgruntled drivers of cyclists riding unlawfully would suggest you were a motorists advacocy group. It's great we've got you thinking.

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Eric Meyer 2 weeks, 3 days ago

I think RCR knows its role just fine. The day RCR takes the extremist interpretation (likely you included) of the two abreast portion of the law that "other cyclists in town" is the day I walk away from the club. Send a memo to paper with your lawyers interpretation of the current cycling laws in the form of a letter to the editor if you think RCR's advocacy approach is the wrong one. Advocacy is about working with other user groups not giving them the finger.

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Martha D Young 2 weeks, 5 days ago

As I was making a left turn in my car onto Oak St, from the four-way stop at Third and Oak, I was startled by a cyclist flying through the intersection from Fish Creek Falls Road. I narrowly avoided hitting him. Continuing down Oak I noticed two cyclists blowing through the stop sign at Fifth and Oak. As a long-time member of RCR and an avid cyclist I was dismayed by the blatant disregard these riders showed for their own and others' safety. Whatever effort RCR can make to educate cyclists I support. I fear, however, that those cyclists who ignore or flaunt traffic rules are not paying attention to RCR's message either.

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Pat West 2 weeks, 5 days ago

There is not enough ink in my IPad to tell about all the poor drivers I see every day. iI will once again say the bigger problem on our roads is drivers that do not know, or follow the rules.

The last 2 deaths on our roads were the fault of drivers, one speeding in a dump truck, one driver with a medical condition that caused blackout. Both drivers were "professional" drivers and held CDL's.

Please someone show me link to the injury or death caused by a cyclist disobeying the laws.(Not the cyclist) Cyclists disobeying the law may be frustrating. But speeders, DUI, and inattentive driver can kil other road users. I believe the police understand this and enforce accordingly. like it or not driving is a higher responsibility toward other road users than cycling, and the laws and enforcment enforcement reflect this.

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cindy constantine 2 weeks, 5 days ago

Pat, Trying to defend cyclist "bad behavior" by citing drivers "at fault" is not a good strategy. Did you read this summer about the cyclist in Boulder flying down Flagstaff Road (steep and windy) in Boulder who veered in to the other lane around a blind corner and was hit and killed by an uphill driver who was obeying the law? The driver was not cited . . . . just sayin'. Why would some cyclists continue to disobey stopping where signs are clearly posted unless they have a "death wish"? Who in their right mind flies thru stop signs and red lights (happened to me this a.m. unless they plan on eventually being taken out of the gene pool.

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jerry carlton 2 weeks, 5 days ago

I had a CDL for 15 years in Routt County and never had an accident, ticket, or killed anybody. I agree that there are many, many, poor, distracted drivers everywhere in the country. What irritates drivers about bicyclists is running stop signs. More cyclists run stop signs than stop at them. Motor vehicles do not consistently run stop signs.

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Matt Charity 2 weeks, 5 days ago

Cindy, I've seen a a few cyclists get taken out of the gene pool. The first time I saw it happen, I was riding along in a group, when an oncoming car making an overtake hit a cyclist just ahead of me head on. The force of the impact decapitated him, I saw his head come off of his body. The second time I saw a cyclist taken out of the gene pool was when the group I was cycling with had to slam on the brakes because a tractor came out of a field into the road. A cyclist who was at the head of the group, my friends father as it happened, was impaled on the hay bail fork. He bled to death before the ambulance arrived. On a third occasion, a very good friend of mine was hit by a car from behind whilst he was cycling. The force of the impact knocked him 100ft down the road from the point of his contact with the car. It later emerged that the driver, a mother of two, was looking back at her children tending their needs when she should have been watching where she was going. This friend of mine has spent the last 20yrs of his life with paralyses from his chest down- out of the gene pool. I know of 8 people, during my 31 yrs of cycling out on the roads, who have been killed by motorists- just sayin.

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cindy constantine 2 weeks, 5 days ago

Matt--

Sorry for your losses. . . The law is being violated on both sides of the ledger. 25 pound bikes have to use extra care when sharing the road with 3,000 to 5,000 pound vehicles. In this county the road that scares me the most is 129 where blind curves and no shoulders almost make it impossible for a biker. . . . yet there are many of them every day. If a hay truck comes around a corner doing the speed limit in his lane runs across bikers two abreast that have ear phones on and God forbid the worst happens, is the hay hauler to blame???? I really feel that some roads should have exclusions against bikers for fear of this exact scenario.

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Pat West 2 weeks, 5 days ago

Cindy, don't you have it backwards. In my opinion, someone operating a 3000-5000 pound vehicle, or a hay hauler is operating on open roads, has an extra responsibilty to go below the posted Fastest speed that is allowed to maintain public saftey.

our roads are not an interstate highway where your ability to go as fast as the law allows is guarented.

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cindy constantine 2 weeks, 4 days ago

Sorry, Pat, totally disagree with your assessment on 129 in particular. Cyclists have many options where to do their "pleasure ride." If you are a 5th generation rancher/farmer who has hay/cattle to get to market their use of this road takes priority--what road options do they have to make their livelihood? I am just willing to voice what so many feel but think it is "politically incorrect" to say out loud!! Perhaps prohibiting cyclists certain times of the year or days of the week on this road is the answer until shoulders can be built---which I doubt will happen in a lifetime.

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dave mcirvin 2 weeks, 4 days ago

bike town USA....until there becomes a series of cycling fatalities, not sure there is enough room, $ and will/favorable voices (maybe those driving vehicles AND the cyclists as well) to build/warrant a Telluride-like bike path up 129 to Clark.

first things first, let's outlaw thumb tacks (yes, I'm almost kidding).

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Matt Charity 2 weeks, 4 days ago

Cindy's comments illustrate beautifully my original reason for commenting on this article. Tyler, if you're still following comments, Cindy and motorists like her live here. Maybe, educating Cindy and people like her would be a great place for RCR to start. In the meantime, Cindy, you need to email RCR and clearly out line which areas and roads you think it is that cyclists shouldn't ride. They will be only to happy to get the 'no cycling this road' signs ready for you! What really astounds me is how someone like Cindy ever passed a test to drive a vehicle on the roads. Bike town, you clearly have your work cut out with that proposition of yours!

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cindy constantine 2 weeks, 4 days ago

Matt,

Maybe a "usage/licensing tax" should be assessed all bikers and put into a savings account like dave mentioned above to create a safe shoulder/bike path to 129. Was 129 designed/built to handle bikes, cars, motorhomes pulling boats, agricultural vehicles safely? Many roads in this county have been redesigned/widened to handle bikes and vehicles safely but 129 is not one of them. I find it astounding the attitude of some bikers that their rights exceed all others. My comments are specifically related to being proactive about safety before there are deaths on 129. Maybe not a biker, but a motorist swerving to avoid one around a blind curve and rolling their car. Speed is not the issue on 129 as much as the narrowness of the road.

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cindy constantine 2 weeks, 4 days ago

And once again Pat and Matt--

Attacking drivers is your answer instead of coming up with safe alternatives to problem roads. I stand by my assertion that 129 does not handle drivers and bikers safely.

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Pat West 2 weeks, 4 days ago

Sorry if you feel attacked, I just think that it is the responsibility of everyone to keep the roads safe. What about that camper with a trailer thatsthat's going the speed limit and comes around the bend to find a cow in the road, or a rancher moving stock? You must control you vehicle in a safe manner at all times, it is the responsibility that comes with the priviledge of driving on our roadways

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Michael Bird 2 weeks, 3 days ago

Pat, I'm confused. If safety is so important, why do so many bicylists continuously ride illegally on City sidewalks endangering the elderly, pedestrians, and themselves? Around the Post Office it is like the Tour de France. And most that i see blow past stop signs .

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Pat West 2 weeks, 3 days ago

Why do cars speed? Could it be that our automobile technology has advanced greater than our road design, or are all drivers psycho, speed driven, NASCAR wana-be's? Feel free to borrow my '78F-150 for a drive and you can realize how much different a car drives now than 30+ years ago when these roads were paved.

Cyclists are on the sidewalks because they are inexperienced, and afraid of drivers and roads that do not take them into consideration. If our roads had adequate bike lanes, they would be used. Also an enforcement problem.

Thanks for bringing this back to my point of disappointment if the new pavement and intersections don't include cyclists in their design.

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Michael Bird 2 weeks, 2 days ago

OMG -bicylists ignore the law, frighten and endanger all pedestrians on the sidewalk because they are afraid of drivers ? Why can't they obey the law, allow pedestrians their freedom to calmly walk on a sidewalk by walking with their bikes ? As cars have advanced so have bicycles but are a lot of bicylists now speed driven? Like motorists it appears so. Regardless of anything else, bicylists cannot ride on our City sidewalks because it is against the law, for safety of others, common courtesy, and common sense. Just as motorists ignoring red lights is dangerous so is disobeying the law forbidding riding on City sidewalks or are bicylists somehow above the law ? BTW- I strongly support bicylicing and public expenses to support it but I don't support lawbreakers of any kind.

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Michael Bird 2 weeks ago

Let me tey to understand your response. Cicylists illegally ride on City sidewalks scaring and endangering pedestrians, especially the elderly and very young, because they are inexperienced and afraid. It is OK to scare others as long as they aren't afraid, huh ? Of course they could walk and obey the law and not make others afraid but they ride on the sidewalks to gain more experience ? Of course, they could walk with their bikes but they are speed driven because modern bike designs ? Is that what you're saying. When we rode our Schwinn one speed bikes, we always rode only on the streets. One reason is that our parents taught us to respect others and that riding on sidwalks was never safe for pedestrians. Since auto drivers must gain experience before obtaining a license and driving a car, wouldn't it be a better idea if these inexperienced bike riders gained experience at a safe area, such as an empty school parking lot, instead of illegally using City sidewalks to gain experience.

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Pat West 2 weeks ago

Both groups break the law because they are ignorant of the dangers they present to others because they are desensitized to how the difference in speeds feels for the slower traffic.

Inexperienced cyclists will remove themselves from dangers on a roadway that is not designed to provide them a safe lane for travel, and do so because auto traffic is moving faster the the speed limit, and unaware of the danger of their speed, due to the modern, quiet powerful car, a lack of enforcment, and peer drivers showing the same action.

Looking at the third and Lincoln intersection, the yampa core trail empties onto the sidewalk in front of the Rabbit Ears motel, with no delineation of where the core trail ends, and the side walk begins. A sign showing where the core trail ends and sidewalk begins would educate core trail users of the end of this trail. Otherwise how do visitors know to dismount, that the Core trail just ended?

Also riding westbound into this intersection on the roadway, a cyclist has a 8 ft shoulder that at Health and Rec becomes a turn lane with no place for a cyclist to go except to enter the traffic lane. If you ask me, the turn lane isn't to CDot spec, and is too small for the traffic it serves, and should be removed, or redesigned. But that mistake is set in 40year concrete. At most times traffic is going 30-35 mph down the hill into downtown, dispite the 25 mph limit. Safest place for a cyclist that dosnt want to enter the traffic lane (inexperienced) is the huge sidewalk.

Your single speed Schwinn isn't the same bike we ride now, on my mountain bike, 15-20mph is a easy pace, but is hazardous to a walker going 2-3mph, but is no match for cars doing 30-35mph. I doubt that in your time drivers were roaring around neighborhood streets at 30+ mph, cars just didn't feel that safe at those speed back then in small residential neighborhoods. But I have seen plenty of mini vans and SUV's catching me or tailgating me doing the 25mph speed limit. How do they catch me if I'm driving as fast as the law allows?

Both the cars breaking the law speeding, and bikes on sidewalks present a danger to others, and with better enforcment, and road design this could be solved. If bikes were ticketed for riding on sidewalks, word would get around, and the action would stop. If drivers would recognize the 25mph speed limit downtown, and accept that only when downtown is empty(never) should the maximum allowable speed be maintained. Roadways would be safer for all of us to enjoy. But then you would get resistance from those that feel giving a kid a $110 ticket for riding on the sidewalk is a bit harsh.

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Pat West 2 weeks ago

I don't belive either group is being malicious in their intent, or making a conscious effort to break the law, just times, transportation technology and population has advanced while infrastructure has not. That's one of the main reasons I object to public funding that markets our city's bike resources. We still have lots of "shovel ready" projects that could be funded to make us more bike friendly, instead of saying it we should be building it.

When visitors come to steamboat and see we have the infrastructure to support safe cycling on our ONE major roadway, and the minor feeder roads, they will know we are a bike town without needing a marketing slogan to convince them.

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Michael Bird 1 week, 3 days ago

I appreciate your comments and even agree with many of them. What makes no sense to me is riding a bicycle from 3rd to 12th - only 9 blocks - on our City sidewalk. One can bike all over town, use expensive bike paths paid for by us, and still can't walk the few blocks of our downtown area respecting others and our commen sense law prohibiting riding on City sidewalks. If an auto accident occurs, the insurance of the one at fault pays for injuries.Since so many bicylists have no liability insurance, they cannot pay for injuries they cause unless they are quite wealthy. Since bicycles are "vehicles", do you think problems would be reduced if bicylists were required to be licensed and have liability insurance ? Plus have a required training period ? Auto operators must and safer driving has followed.

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Pat West 1 week, 3 days ago

Training, licences, insurance? It would be much easier to ask the SSPD to enforce the law and ticket people that break it. Anyone can be written a summons for disobeying the law, no licence is required, and ignorance of a law is not an excuse a judge will honor. Call the cops, make a report, if you dont they will not know this is a problem they need to start addressing.

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cindy constantine 2 weeks, 4 days ago

Cow/elk/dogs/porcupines---seen them all on 129--have always been able to stop in time to not hit them. I am a slow driver which is why impatient drivers pass me on 129--or honk. However killing a cow means I might have to pay for the cow--hitting a bike unintentionally means I may go to jail and lose my lifes savings/work--even if I was following the letter of the law on the roadway. Your comment is comparing apples to oranges!!

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Pat West 2 weeks, 4 days ago

Cindy please explain to me how going slow Enough to be able to react to whatever is on the roadd prevents anyone from getting their hay or livestock to market. Not long ago these roads were dirt, what did ranchers do then. I would love to understand your point of view. and iI dontdon't mean to be snarky, just forum posts sometimes read that way no matter how iI state things.

and iI will agree that 129 is not designed for all the use it gets. When the state park expanded, and inprovedin prove the road north of Clark, our county leaders should have insisted the entire road be improved.

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Scott Wedel 2 weeks, 4 days ago

It looks like about there is about 1 cyclist death per 10 million miles ridden. And 39% of those occur at night. Bike fatalities includes drunks, riding against traffic and so on. Most happen at an intersection.

http://bicycleuniverse.info/transpo/almanac-safety.html

So Matt's experience of seeing multiple fatal accidents is exceptionally rare. The odds are very much against any even a serious rider from being killed or seeing a fatal accident. To have seen multiple fatal accidents is exceptionally rare.

As for 129, surely you all are not talking about the road to Hahn's Peak. The road has decent visibility and reduced speeds were appropriate. It isn't a particularly hazardous road for those that know it.

That said, when I was riding a lot, I still avoided it on the weekends. The ranchers and locals were fine, they know the road and they don't want to crash into the back of their friends moving a tractor so they generally drive reasonably. The trouble is the weekend tourist traffic in RVs or hauling boats whom barely know where their vehicle is on the road and then get surprised by turns and end up in the shoulder or the oncoming lane. And then there are the idiot tourists on motorcycles seeing if they can go 100 mph.

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Kieran O'Halloran 2 weeks, 2 days ago

I think Subaru, USA, or Toyota, USA is a better fit and reaches more people. What % of steamboat rides bikes? Just curious esp when compared to the amount of cars on the roads around here now.

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cindy constantine 2 weeks, 2 days ago

I miss Ski Town USA when we had a passionate, devoted yet friendly bike town in the "off season." I miss seeing elk on Emerald mountain, in fact I miss hiking on Emerald mountain without getting yelled at to get off the trails. I miss Steamboat . . . . . (there must be a song in here somewhere. LOL)

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john bailey 2 weeks, 1 day ago

ditto that cindy , but the writing is on the wall.....sadly.....

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Scott Wedel 2 weeks ago

When were cyclists and drivers ever not bitching about each other in SB or anywhere else for that matter?

They certainly were 20 years ago. These are eternal grievances. Cars sometimes have to slow down to pass a bicyclist. Bicyclists sometimes feel that a car came needlessly close to hitting them. Bicyclists sometimes mix unsafely with pedestrians.

Basic fact it is mostly talk and hurt feelings because actual number of injuries from any of it is low.

And sometimes the hurt feelings is actually the safer way. There is a long generally lightly used section of bike and pedestrian path along hwy 1 south of Santa Cruz. An experienced local cyclist told us the safest way to pass a slow cyclist or jogger is to just fly past on the far side of the path. That when you say "Left" then they look over their left shoulder and move left into your path. If you want to have good manners and tell everyone that you are passing them then you should expect to slow down to their speed, let them get into your way, let them then get out of your way and then pass them. Or you can rudely pass them without warning and they don't have time to react until you are well past them.

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Kieran O'Halloran 1 week, 6 days ago

Same with skiing. Something (not always) its safer to not say anything when passing. I will click my poles together when coming up behind people on cat tracks so they can tell where I am.

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jerry carlton 1 week, 6 days ago

"Passing on your left" works on the core trail. I have not hit a pedestrian yet or come close.

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