Yampatika seeks community help to earn grant

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— Yampatika is looking to win a grant from Seeds of Change and needs the community’s votes to do so.

The grant, valued between $10,000 and $20,000, will go toward obtaining more garden space for Yampatika’s USDA-certified People’s Garden, which is located at the group’s Environmental Learning Center at Legacy Ranch.

Funding, if received, will be used to purchase gardening materials and supplies to build garden beds, create educational gardening opportunities for youths and adults and develop a gardening program to provide fresh, healthy and locally grown food for the local food bank.

Through the grant, Yampatika hopes to be able to connect hundreds of people to the process of growing local, organic food in Steamboat’s short growing season.

USDA People’s Gardens are required to benefit the community, be collaborative and incorporate sustainable practices. Community members who have contributed thousands of hours have made Yampatika’s People’s Garden possible.

Originally surrounded by a weedy area with no pathways, the garden has grown from one raised bed to four, and the demand for more garden space is growing. Adjacent to the beds is an outdoor classroom that allows for campers to engage in healthy outdoor gardening pursuits.

The Seeds of Change Grant Program is awarding $190,000 in grants, with two recipients awarded $20,000 and 15 others awarded $10,000. The top 50 eligible organizations with the most votes move on to the judging phase.

Yampatika is asking for community members to visit www.seedsofchangegrant.com and vote every day from multiple computers and devices for its project. Voters can search by the garden name (Yampatika), by zip code (80487) or city and state (Steamboat Springs, CO).

Voters also are encouraged to spread the word to help Yampatika win the grant.

Emma Wilson, a senior at Steamboat Springs High School, is working as a spring intern for the Steamboat Pilot & Today.

Comments

Eric Meyer 3 months ago

Steve, I would have thought that you would be against telling a private company what they can and cannot do with their profits. Sometimes giving your money and time to benefit others feels good and eventually comes full circle. A quick google search shows that the private company set up a 1% fund to give back. This looks to be private money and not tax money. Your rants are getting old. Your BS has to be called out. Fire away Steve, reply to me, reply to yourself etc. etc. Ready, Set, Go....

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Eric Meyer 3 months ago

Seeds of Change looks to be a private company to me. http://www.seedsofchange.com/organicseed.aspx Go ahead look for a funding link between the Seeds of Change company offering the grant that this article is about and the USDA and prove me wrong. I'll be the first to admit it if you do. But, my guess is that you'll continue to twist everything in your world until it fits your angry views including something as simple as the Steamboat Springs community working together to improve our town with private money from a company located in California. Your link to the USDA has nothing to do with funding the Seeds of Change Grant.

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rhys jones 3 months ago

I won't venture an opinion on the pros or cons of this particular grant, although it does seem to be a frivolous use of taxpayer money; I question its actual return...

I do agree with Steve's third post (wow, and I mean that more than once). For Yampatika, a do-gooder organization one would normally credit with ethics and morals, to publicly advocate defrauding the system, circumventing the one-man-one-vote system by voting repeatedly, from different sources and on different days, I find offensive. It's okay if we cheat for us, right? No justification can be claimed in that we are competing against larger populations, nor that they are doing it too. It's just not the right thing to do. If you start cheating - when do you stop?

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Eric Meyer 3 months ago

Rhys, (1) This is not taxpayer money. (2) Since it is a private company giving out the money, they are setting the rules. The private company (Seeds of Change) likely wants continued publicity so they write the rules on who can vote and how often they can vote. There is nothing wrong with following the rules. Not knowing the rules or intentionally breaking them is another story.

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rhys jones 3 months ago

Eric -- Haven't read the rules, but it's safe to assume that voting on multiple days is okay, more than once in a day, probably not. It was that "every day from multiple computers and devices" which stuck in my craw.

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rhys jones 3 months ago

Yeah, that can't look too good for 'em...

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rhys jones 3 months ago

I repeat: Wow.

I had exactly the same thought when I read it the first time, but you beat me to the punch in the comments, Steve. Touche. Only grudgingly did I then agree with you.

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Eric Meyer 3 months ago

They clearly should not be promoting the multiple devices.

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Eric Meyer 3 months ago

Thanks for taking another look. And, your second part I would bet our views are pretty close.

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rhys jones 3 months ago

So if this article had appeared in a timely fashion -- and we'd all voted in a legal fashion -- Yampatika might have gotten their grant anyway? Dang the bad luck!!

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rhys jones 3 months ago

I probably shouldn't suggest that this may have been a case of preordained karma, but...

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Tim Keenan 3 months ago

Too bad this article appeared on April 22 when voting ended April 21. Maybe next year, with a little more notice, we'll get in there.

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