Colorado's private health insurance enrollment stands at 124,000

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Final figures for Colorado's open-enrollment in private health insurance under the Affordable Care Act stand at about 124,000, according to state officials.

That number kept climbing after the March 31 deadline, when it topped 118,000, as those who started enrollment but were unable to complete it by month's end were allowed to finish.

The state insurance exchange, Connect for Health Colorado, said Monday that enrollment is now closed until Nov. 15, 2014.

Connect for Health, which opened for business Oct. 1, offered 150 plans for individuals and families through 10 insurance companies. Tax credits for enrollees averaged $277 a month.

Read more at www.denverpost.com.

Comments

Thomss Steele 7 months, 2 weeks ago

And 240,000 had their policies cancelled NY the same screwed up legislation... Way to go dems... I guess you NOW know what was in the bill...

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Joe Meglen 7 months, 2 weeks ago

The “Affordable” Care Act is not private. It is a soft form of fascism, a “partnership” between the State and the Medical-Industrial complex. The concept of bottom up governance taught in government schools is a myth, certainly at the national level. Large corporate and monied interests control, and are the government. This has been the case for many generations.

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Chris Hadlock 7 months, 2 weeks ago

And yet the overall rate of people who do not have insurance is actually dropping.

http://www.gallup.com/poll/167798/uninsured-rate-continues-fall.aspx?utm_source=alert&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=syndication&utm_content=morelink&utm_term=All%20Gallup%20Headlines

You can keep telling yourself how bad it is, but the actual facts tell a more mixed story. As one of the people who actually received one of those letters, it came coupled with a new insurance policy that was remarkably similar. Hmmmmm, not quite the horror story you would have us believe. I do agree there are problems that need to be addressed, but overall the law seems to be working.

Insurers are planning on increasing their participation: http://www.politico.com/story/2014/04/health-insurers-obamacare-105676.html?hp=t1

This is not the trainwreck you all have been predicting and sooner or later you are going to have to admit it! I don't expect any of you to like it, that is a different question,

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Ken Mauldin 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Chris: Let's put aside, for a moment, any disagreement about the insurance coverage component of Obamacare and look at the overall economic impact of the law:
- Fewer people are part of the workforce.
- Fewer people have full-time jobs.
- More people are on disability.
- The CBO predicts our already massive national debt will be much higher as a result of Obamacare.

Please tell us more about why you think these conditions are better for America.

1

Joe Meglen 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Chris,

“Obamacare” is a Progressive (Fascist) exercise of plenary government power fundamentally opposed to economic freedom, therefore individual freedom, the principles upon which the united States were founded. It is yet another "Progressive" assault on the Constitution and liberty. A strictly limited government has become unlimited. As government grows, freedom and opportunity die. The “Affordable” care act is not about providing better access to affordable health care, it is about controlling and further plundering the people.

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Dan Kuechenmeister 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Interesting survey regards health insurance premium costs.

"For the individual insurance market (plans sold directly to consumers); among the ten states seeing some of the sharpest average increases are: Delaware at 100%, New Hampshire 90%, Indiana 54%, California 53%, Connecticut 45%, Michigan 36%, Florida 37%, Georgia 29%, Kentucky 29%, and Pennsylvania 28%."

"Health insurance premiums are showing the sharpest increases perhaps ever according to a survey of brokers who sell coverage in the individual and small group market. Morgan Stanley’s healthcare analysts conducted the proprietary survey of 148 brokers. The April survey shows the largest acceleration in small and individual group rates in any of the 12 prior quarterly periods when it has been conducted.

The average increases are in excess of 11% in the small group market and 12% in the individual market. Some state show increases 10 to 50 times that amount. The analysts conclude that the “increases are largely due to changes under the ACA.”

The analysts conducting the survey attribute the rate increases largely to a combination of four factors set in motion by Obamacare: Commercial underwriting restrictions, the age bands that don’t allow insurers to vary premiums between young and old beneficiaries based on the actual costs of providing the coverage, the new excise taxes being levied on insurance plans, and new benefit designs."

http://www.forbes.com/sites/scottgottlieb/2014/04/07/health-plan-premiums-are-skyrocketing-according-to-new-survey-of-148-insurance-brokers-analysts-blame-obamacare/

1

Joe Meglen 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Chris,

In order to distill the discussion of the ACA, or collectivism in general, down to basics, I have a question: Is it right to take from one person against their will and give these proceeds to another?

1

mark hartless 7 months, 2 weeks ago

2 wrongs make everyting right, Joe. Didn't you get the memmo...??

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Chris Hadlock 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Happens every day Joe. Whether it is the sales tax I pay to the City of Steamboat for Services I cannot even use because I live in the county to the FICA tax I pay with every check. What makes the ACA any different than the variety of other taxes that US Citizens pay? You can call it "gun to your head" if it makes you feel any better, but taxes are and will continue to be a fact of life. This one is no different than the rest.

Ken, better check that source, the CBO actually shows that the ACA is reducing the debt, not increasing it. http://www.cbo.gov/publication/44176

Insurance rates are actually better in states that fully participate: http://www.gallup.com/poll/168539/uninsured-rates-drop-states-embracing-health-law.aspx?utm_source=WWW&utm_medium=csm&utm_campaign=syndication

Yes, I know you want to complain about increased premiums and it is all Obama's fault. I get that. Funny thing is that none of you seem to remember that insurance premiums have been climbing at double digit rates for over 20 years with individuals and small companies bearing the brunt of the costs. If you check your history this has been going on for over 30 years.

http://www.statisticbrain.com/health-insurance-cost-statistics/ http://www.factcheck.org/2011/10/factchecking-health-insurance-premiums/#

The ACA is actually projected to reduce and contain healthcare premiums (again per the CBO) http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2014/04/14/lower-premiums-yes-really-drive-down-obamacares-expected-costs-cbo-says/

spin it however you want, but will any of you admit that you were wrong when the law works?

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Joe Meglen 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Chris,

You obfuscate rather than answer my question. I will ask again: Is it right to take from one person against their will and give these proceeds to another?

1

mark hartless 7 months, 2 weeks ago

I kinda noticed that too, Joe. He didn't want to say whether it was right, just went straight into examples of howit happens elsewhere.

1

Ken Mauldin 7 months, 2 weeks ago

He also hasn't offered an explanation of how he thinks America is better off with fewer people working and more people on disability.

1

jerry carlton 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Steve a minor correction of spelling It is Obamination.

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Dan Kuechenmeister 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Chris, So the survey I sighted is incorrect? http://www.forbes.com/sites/scottgottlieb/2014/04/07/health-plan-premiums-are-skyrocketing-according-to-new-survey-of-148-insurance-brokers-analysts-blame-obamacare/ And yes, as I hope we find a way for "affordable" health care for all I will admit that I am wrong if the ACA as it was originally passed works. Given that there have already been 30+ changes made to the bill by the Obama administration, don't hold your breath.

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mark hartless 7 months, 2 weeks ago

When I was a kid the "standard" Oreo Cookie was 1/4" thick.

Nabisco introduced a "Double Stuff" Oreo that was 1/2" thick. It was fantastic.

Today the "Double Stuff" Oreo cookie is less than 1/4" thick and the original 1/4" thick Oreo Cookie is about the thickness of a credit card.

The gradual, almost imperceptible change in thickness, combined with equally subtle increases in price, results in a cookie that cost the company 15% or 20% of the original in materials, while the average person actually pays 300% - 400% as much of their weekly wages, for the same amount of cookie as they did in 1970.

You idiots traded 300 million full- sized cookies for 320 million half- sized cookies.

While everyone is duped into arguing about who got and lost "cookies" almost nobody seems to have the prescence of mind to understand that the definition of "cookie" has been pulled right out from under you.

Suckers!

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Dan Kuechenmeister 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Mark, My apologies as I am unaware of who you refer to when you use the term Tea Baggers. I am aware that the term tea bag has a slang reference to an act which shouldn't be described in this paper. Possibly you are trying to insult those with whom you disagree. I am aware of the Tea Party, which to the best of my knowledge has done little or no damage to people or property at any of their gatherings and are allowed free speech just as you are, unlike the Occupy Wall Street crowd which has no problem destroying property or assaulting police officers, or liberal academia which has no problem preventing conservative speakers from appearing or if they slip through the cracks allowing disrrupters to interrupt or cancel the speech. Now lest you think I am a member of the Tea Party, I am not. Nor am I a member of the Democrat, Republican or Libertarian parties either. I take the Groucho Marx approach to "clubs". 'I do not want to belong to any club that would have me as a member'.

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Dan Kuechenmeister 7 months, 2 weeks ago

So then you have no clue what the Tea Party is all about. No surprise there. For you it's just about trying to insult anyone who disagrees with your point of view. Sad, but it is America and you ate allowed to spew your venom in a public forum.

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Dan Kuechenmeister 7 months, 1 week ago

Mark, If you ever have a problem on what I say call me out on it. I have no problem with it. I would prefer that you not do it in an insulting or demeaning way such as some in this forum choose to do. But it is America and we still have that free speech thing although I begin to wonder as the left seems to have a thing for shutting down (Brandeis University - Ayaan Hirsi Ali) or attempting to shut down (Univ. of Minnesota - my alma mater - shame on them - Condi Rice) the free speech rights of those they disagree with. We are lucky to have a forum like this for all of us to spew

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Chris Hadlock 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Joe, I DID answer you question, you just don't happen to like my answer. You asked:

"In order to distill the discussion of the ACA, or collectivism in general, down to basics, I have a question: Is it right to take from one person against their will and give these proceeds to another?"

I answered your question in the context of the ACA as requested. The Supreme Court disagrees with your assessment and called the ACA a "tax". I realize that you do not like that decision but you do not get to override the Supreme Court no matter how strong your beliefs and just like I have to live with the Citizens United decision, you have to live with the fact that the ACA is a tax.

The Constitution says: "The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States;"

The Supreme Court also ruled that Healthcare falls under the general welfare clause and is therefore legal and constitutional so your argument that:

"In order to distill the discussion of the ACA, or collectivism in general, down to basics, I have a question: Is it right to take from one person against their will and give these proceeds to another?"

Is null and void because the Supreme Court said so. End of Story,

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Chris Hadlock 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Dan, no it is not incorrect, just slanted. I am sure that every survey or poll that any of us can find are all slanted. I can match you poll for poll all day long but that won't really prove much, will it?

Bottom line is that all the Republican scare tactics about the ACA keep being proved wrong. I ask again, will you ever admit that some of the Fox News headlines over the last 4 years about the ACA (aka Obamacare) we flat out wrong?

I am not trying to say that I buy into this law lock stock and barrel. It is too big, too complicated and still allows some of the abuses that caused the problems in the first place. If would do many things differently, but somehow the politicians did not listen to me, go figure.

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Dan Kuechenmeister 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Chris, I answered your question in a previous post. Maybe you should read it. Regards your answer to Joe you stated that the Supreme Court ruled on ACA. Then pray tell, why has Obama been able to "override the Supreme Court" and change the law 30+ times.

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mark hartless 7 months, 2 weeks ago

"Stories like this give a chance for the vocal Tea Baggers to publicly display their Tea Swagger."

With this administration it's like shootin' fish in a barrel, Mark.

We were promised the "most transparent administration in the history of the republic" That's a demonstrable load of crap.

We were told "if you like you'r healthcare/ insurance you can keep it..." That was a complete load of crap.

The administration's attorney general ran guns to Mexico resulting in more deaths than all the school shootings in the last twenty years and not one person went to jail. That's a load of crap.

We were promised that Gitmo would be closed. That was a load of crap.

We have drones killing people without a trial. That used to be a load of crap according to the "progressives", but I guess the election "progressed" them right past their discomfort with that.

The National Security Agency is reading your e- mail. That would have been a load of crap for you guys too...

The head of the IRS refused to testify before the people of this nation's elected representatives and instead she said "I refuse to testify on the grounds that it might incriminate me." That's a load of crap.

The White House wire-tapped dozens of journalists/reporters' in an effort to intimidate the press. That's a load of crap.

I'd say this administration has made quite a little "s**t sandwich out of the constitution and all you folks can do is use derrogatory language...

1

Chris Hadlock 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Dan, sorry I did miss that.. Presidents have power to change stuff, what can I say. They all do it.

Sucks when you disagree, great when you think it is right and proper. I am not sure but I do not believe any sitting President has ever been in Court over Executive Orders and the current POTUS is about average in that respect. The Left was all incensed about George Bush's Executive orders and the right is all pissed off about Obama's. Not much meat there really, just a bunch of grumbling about the guy with the pen.

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Joe Meglen 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Chris,

Once again you obfuscate. The Justices of the Supreme Court are employees of the federal government. They are appointed by politicians, and with few exceptions, they have proven to be political animals catering to their employer. Their employer hates the Constitution. The SCOTUS does not determine what is right or wrong. I ask you a third time: Is it right to take from one person against their will and give these proceeds to another? This does not require a long dissertation. The answer to my question is either yes or no. Which is it?

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Chris Hadlock 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Joe look at your own words. You changed the question. I did not obsfucate, I answered the question in the context it was asked:

"In order to distill the discussion of the ACA, or collectivism in general, down to basics, I have a question: Is it right to take from one person against their will and give these proceeds to another?"

Asked in the context of:

Is it OK for me to take my shotgun, break into your house and take your stuff to give it to lift-up the answer is no.

In the context of: Is it OK for the Federal Gov't to tax your earnings in order to pay for the ACA, the Supreme Court said Yes. Doesn't matter what you or I think about it, we do not get to overrule the Supreme Court no matter how strongly we disagree with their decisions now do we.

That IS the law of the land. Are you calling for armed revolution against the Federal Gov't?

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Kevin Nerney 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Joe I don't want to put words in your mouth and answer for you but-----Chris --- Yes! It may come to that sooner rather then later, just look what happened down at the Bundy Ranch in Nevada. I'm not taking sides on that one just yet but it appears that there are an awful lot of pissed off people with weapons ready to stand up against the Feds. I don't think the Feds backed off I think they retreated to re-group and figure out their next move. It's beginning to look like a third world riot except the citizens won't be throwing rocks and bottles they will be armed to the teeth and spewing lead.

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Dan Kuechenmeister 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Hey Chris, Don't know if you are familiar with Jonathan Turley. If not, google him and his testimony before congress regards current POTUS and his use of executive orders. FYI, he is an Obama supporter so not a knuckledragger like me. (-; Here is more from Turley. http://www.wnd.com/2014/02/we-are-in-the-midst-of-a-constitutional-crisis/

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Joe Meglen 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Chris,

My question is not a matter of what is “legal”; it is a matter of what is moral. The fact that you are so evasive answers my question.

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Chris Hadlock 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Now there is some:

ob·fus·cate [ob-fuh-skeyt, ob-fuhs-keyt] Show IPA verb (used with object), ob·fus·cat·ed, ob·fus·cat·ing. 1. to confuse, bewilder, or stupefy. 2. to make obscure or unclear: to obfuscate a problem with extraneous information.

If you don't agree with me you are immoral. Did I get that right Joe? I support your right to your opinion. Do you support mine?

I answered your question crystal clear in the context it was asked. Let's put it this way. If I walk up to your front door and shoot you dead it it murder. If you are breaking into my house and I shoot you dead it is self-defense. The difference is context not obfuscation or evasion.

Kevin, No matter what problems we face as a Nation, discourse, debate and discussion is the proper path for change. Armed revolution is not going to make this a better place to live for our children and grand-children. I agree, the Feds are not done with Mr. Bundy but they definitely made a smart decision to back down and avoid a Ruby Ridge or Waco situation.

1

Joe Meglen 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Chris,

The fact that you do everything possible but answer my question establishes that you know the correct answer. The correct answer dismantles arguments supporting legalized theft. I offer you one more opportunity; Is it right to take from one person against their will and give these proceeds to another? Your answer, or lack of, demonstrates much about character and principle.

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Chris Hadlock 7 months, 2 weeks ago

And the fact that you refuse to accept my answer says much about yours.

I wish you the best Mr. Meglen.

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mark hartless 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Here's the thing, Chris..You are smug.

Just because your hands were not on the shotgun does not mean you had no copability in the use of force.

When you vote for or elkect or defend those who exibit said behavior it's the same as DOING that behavior.

You can smugly say "I didn't do it; it was the administration" all you want. But if you voted for, or supported, or defended the administration, then YOU ARE the administration

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mark hartless 7 months, 2 weeks ago

"Armed revolution is not going to make this a better place to live for our children and grand-children".

That's historically incorrect.

The fact is that armed revolution DID make it a better nation. Without question...

That is, in fact, the story of this nation.

Armed opposition to tyranny has often improved mankind's lot in life. Conversely. it is actually the very aquiescensce and appeasement which you advocate that has rarely improved man's lot in life; and has often led to enslavement, fammine, tyrany, and genocide.

Read your history books.

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Scott Wedel 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Armed revolution known as the South starting the Civil War is what ended slavery in the US.

Armed revolution of the Whiskey Rebellion is what showed the new federal government was strong enough to rule the country.

So, yes, armed revolutions are important.

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rhys jones 7 months, 2 weeks ago

Not to dispute your point, Scott, but my great-great-(great?)-grandpappy, John Brown, had more than a little to do with starting the Civil War, and he attacked pro-slavery folks. From wiki:

During the Kansas campaign, he and his supporters killed five pro-slavery southerners in what became known as the Pottawatomie Massacre in May 1856 in response to the raid on the "free soil" city of Lawrence, Kansas. In 1859 he led a raid on the federal armory at Harpers Ferry. During the raid, he seized the armory; seven people were killed, and ten or more were injured. He intended to arm slaves with weapons from the arsenal, but the attack failed. Within 36 hours, Brown's men had fled or been killed or captured by local pro-slavery farmers, militiamen, and U.S. Marines led by Robert E. Lee. Brown's subsequent capture by federal forces seized the nation's attention, as Southerners feared it was just the first of many Northern plots to cause a slave rebellion that might endanger their lives, while Republicans dismissed the notion and said they would not interfere with slavery in the South.[4]

Historians agree John Brown played a major role in the start of the Civil War. Historian David Potter has said the emotional effect of Brown's raid was greater than the philosophical effect of the Lincoln–Douglas debates, and that his raid revealed a deep division between North and South.[5] Some writers, such as Bruce Olds, describe him as a monomaniacal zealot; others, such as Stephen B. Oates, regard him as "one of the most perceptive human beings of his generation." David S. Reynolds hails the man who "killed slavery, sparked the civil war, and seeded civil rights" and Richard Owen Boyer emphasizes that Brown was "an American who gave his life that millions of other Americans might be free."

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john bailey 7 months, 1 week ago

so , the Civil War was your fault Rhys ?...LOL

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rhys jones 7 months, 1 week ago

He ran an underground railroad of escaped slaves to Canada, not mentioned in wiki. Some of his fund-raising efforts are documented there, and he had a respectable backing. I just find it ironic that an attack on a U.S. government installation, to FIGHT slavery, was opposed by that government, to DEFEND slavery -- led by no less than Robert E. Lee -- and that one incident was sufficient to cause the South to secede. So indirectly, grandpappy DID cause the Civil War. By attacking our government. His dream would be realized, post-mortem, by the same government he attacked.

I just fear that I inherited some of his more reactionary genes.

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Ken Mauldin 7 months, 2 weeks ago

I appreciate that Chris asserts that SCOTUS upheld Obamacare and that should be the end of it.

Anytime I hear someone argue that the Supreme Court has settled a matter for good I wonder if they're talking about slavery (Dred Scott) or Prohibition.

3

Dan Kuechenmeister 7 months, 1 week ago

Hey Neil, While you are taking your victory lap on the "success" of ACA here is some thing to read.

Partial Bio on author Charles Blahous is the director of spending and budget Initiative, a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and a public trustee for Social Security and Medicare. He specializes in domestic economic policy and retirement security (with an emphasis on Social Security), as well as federal fiscal policy, entitlements, demographic change, and health-care reform.

By Charles Blahous | Apr 17, 2014 "Earlier this month there was tremendous press attention to new data indicating that enrollment in the Affordable Care Act (ACA)’s health insurance exchanges had surpassed 7 million. The White House took a victory lap while much of the press, desperate to write something positive after months of reporting on website glitches and insurance plan cancellations, characterized the milestone as good political news for ACA supporters. Our national discussion, however, is missing the truly significant story here; what is unfolding before our eyes is a colossal fiscal disaster, poised to haunt legislators and taxpayers for decades to come.

It is quite possible that the ACA is shaping up as the greatest act of fiscal irresponsibility ever committed by federal legislators.

Where will the money come from to finance the ACA’s health exchange subsidies and Medicaid expansion? No one knows. We do know that the ACA’s financing mechanisms are already falling apart. The ACA’s much-reported website glitches and enrollment shortfalls had actually suggested an upside; if enrollment continued to fall short of previous projections, it was possible that some of the fiscal damage could be contained. But if enrollment has picked up as the law’s financing mechanisms disintegrate, the fiscal damage will be worse than anticipated.

CLASS: The ACA’s “CLASS” long-term care provisions were originally projected to generate $37 billion in net premiums through 2015 ($86 billion over ten years). CLASS was later suspended due to its long-term financial unworkability, meaning these revenues have not materialized and will not.

Employer/individual mandate penalties: These were supposed to have brought in $12 billion through 2015, $101 billion over the first ten years. Because the Obama Administration has repeatedly delayed their enforcement, to date they haven’t brought in much of anything. Some ACA advocates are even beginning to downplay the significance of possibly ditching these mandates altogether, though they were central to the law’s financing scheme.

Medicare Advantage: The ACA was supposed to be financed in part by cuts to Medicare Advantage (MA) totaling $31 billion through FY2015, $128 billion over the first ten years. The White House recently announced that planned MA cuts will not go into effect after all."

http://mercatus.org/expert_commentary/unfolding-fiscal-disaster-behind-aca-enrollment-figures

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john bailey 7 months, 1 week ago

ya just gotta keep pissing in Neils Wheaties , huh ?

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rhys jones 7 months, 1 week ago

The sky is falling!! The sky is falling!!

I checked out this Heartbleed bugger -- and I don't think one has much to fear from it. While it was theoretically possible to ascertain SSNs or passwords via this method, its successful and predictable application was virtually impossible. The way it worked, briefly, is by tricking the server (or client; it could work either way) into sending back more data than necessary during a validation process. The hacker had no control over what data it would be; it would be whatever was most recently discarded. Stored in no organized format, just a bunch of garbage strung together, uglier than a core dump, no registers, gibberish for control characters (line feeds, formatting) no delimiters (separators, commas, for instance) just random text strung out.

There is no evidence anyone was ever harmed by it. Someone snagged 900 Canadian SSN's before they found out and shut it down; a couple other places reported mischief; they could replicate it under controlled circumstances, and that's it. Nobody reported any loss or damage.

It's been fixed. Anybody who snagged your info, would have to have done it while the window was open. If they did that, you'd probably be talking to the police right now.

The technical wherewithal it would require to exploit this hole, and its limited chances of success, its obscurity, the brief time it was open, and the likelihood that one of those capable, had a grudge against you, should ease most peoples' minds immensely.

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rhys jones 7 months, 1 week ago

If I'm messing with 0's and 1's, it's bad times. Assembler isn't much more fun. Upgrades suck; I just want to crank code. Of course a good hacker can glean what he seeks, given enough time. If he's that good with a computer, it probably pays better than crime.

So a few kids snagged some numbers from government databases. Just to show they could. Random numbers, not targeting any individuals, and to what end, who knows. Will Mexicans buy Canadian SSNs?

The data returned by the Heartbleed hack was random, whatever garbage was in discarded memory. Since it was invoked during the login process, that data would likely be from the previous session. Totally random. If somebody was targeting you, they would have had to arrange to log into the same server you used immediately after you logged out.

You had a better chance of being hit by lightning, than your precious data lost to Heartbleed. Again, nobody suffered any harm, and people were arrested for it. Danger to individuals was minimal, more in theory than reality.

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rhys jones 7 months, 1 week ago

The hole has been closed. If they didn't get your info already, it's too late now.

And now I realize with whom I am engaged, he who is more persistent than a border collie, and has less of a life than Scott W. Arguments are won by he who gets in the last word, which you will see shortly, as I am departing this thread at this time, conceding superiority to the dog.

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Chris Hadlock 7 months, 1 week ago

For someone who is evidently retired from Frito Lay, Steve Mendell sure claims to have a very wide range of experience with High end computer skills and climate change. What was your job with Frito Lay Steve, care to enlighten us?

Me thinks he is just very good at finding and posting conspiracy links. He is also very fond circular arguments where he cites his own words as proof that his opinion is correct. A high school debate coach would tear him up and most likely flunk him for incoherent debate tactics. Any of us can find large numbers of surveys and articles on the internet to support even the craziest beliefs. When you choose to fill your head with information that agrees with your personal world view and do not bother to ever read or listen to information that is counter to those beliefs, you will continue to spiral in the direction you have chosen. True intellect comes from listening and debating with those you disagree with.

No sense arguing with crazy Rhys, he has more time and more thoughts in his head that can be argued with. That is what happens when you wear tin foil hats.

PS, core dumps suck big hairy ones. Been there done that. Good information can be found but it takes highly specialized skills and lots of tedious time and patience.

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rhys jones 7 months, 1 week ago

Thanks for covering my back, Chris (and I said I was out of this).

Steve apparently has extensive knowledge on the subject, although the Heartbleed hole was specific to only certain releases of OpenSSL, those have been corrected, and if the culprits didn't steal your identity when they had the chance, that window is closed.

Conspiracies come in different flavors. The Fed is fact. Heartbleed is a) mostly theory, and b) history.

Paranoia can overrule common sense. The few people with the knowlege of the Heartbleed defect, combined with the ability to exploit it, while it was open, most likely have far better things to do with their time than turn into petty thieves. That's a lot of trouble, for a dubious return.

I trust open source well ahead of Gates' can of worms. Nobody knows what's buried in all the undecipherable .EXE's, outside Seattle. After he got off his antitrust charges with basically a slap on the wrist, soon to release XP, his latest at the time... and several closed-door meetings with Congress... one wonders what spyware he buried in his operating system for the Feds. We know for a fact they are monitoring all email traffic; what else can they see? Bank balances? Money transfers? Your pictures?

Get a 404 or 505, who answers first: Microsoft, or Linux? Our community wins that hands down. We (they) fixed Heartbleed as soon as it was discovered (though there are rumors the NSA exploited it for some time first). No harm was done.

Some dogs just like to bark, and I guess there's a bit of border collie in me too.

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rhys jones 7 months, 1 week ago

Is this record skipping? Or is that a terrier, with his teeth in my pants leg?

I repeat: Heartbleed was only specific to certain releases of OpenSSL. Those have been corrected. If your information wasn't stolen already, it won't be now. Not through that hole, anyway.

The Yellowstone volcano could explode at any moment. Should I move to Florida? There are crazy drivers on the road. Should I not cross the street?

Some things fall below my fear threshhold. Yellowstone, drivers, and Heartbleed are three of them.

I've wasted too much of my life on this already; surely there are other bones to gnaw. Ciao!!

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Scott Wedel 7 months, 1 week ago

Well, no shortage of fear mongering hyperbole.

If you are a fraction of the expert that you claim to be then you know you are spewing BS.

The credit reporting agencies have been hacked any number of times and released names, SSNs and a whole slew of other financial information. But that was hardly the end of the world.

That the 16 yer old hacker attempted to use it means nothing because that was after it had been announced. You are just demonstrating your level of bs fear mongering when you write " I PROMISE you the entire hacker community knew about it". Well, yeah, after it has been announced then everyone knows about, but there is still no solid evidence it was exploited prior to it being announced. A scanner that generated the same server log message as the bug exploit is not proof.

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rhys jones 7 months, 1 week ago

Thanks Scott, I take back all the bad things I said about you.

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Chris Hadlock 7 months, 1 week ago

So let's see, your SSN is currently stored at the IRS, DMV, CO Dept of Revenue, Tx Dept of Revenue, City of Steamboat, Ski Corp, Social Security Admin, Medicare, and the Routt County Clerk, YVMA, YVEA, and every other hospital or DR you have ever visited. OMG it is unsafe to store it on the connectforhealthco.com website. Hypocritical much Mr Mendell?

You shop at Amazon, ebay, barnes and noble, target, walmart, city market and think nothing about giving your credit card to the 19 year old waiter/waitress to take out of your site in the back room but storing any personal information on the aca website is surely an unacceptable risk.

No way, no how you ever apply for the ACA because you are most likely on medicare but the ACA is absolutely the worst thing this Gov't ever did hands down, no questions asked and if global warming is manmade it was caused by Obamacare. Oh yeah, Obama is a muslim born in Kenya, George Bush had the Seals take down the twin towers and Common Core is brainwashing children to be socialists and Democrats.

For someone who "claims" to have all this high falutin edumacation and technical experience, you sure are an easy mark for the conspiracy of the day. You probably sent that dictator in Nigeria a hundred bucks too.

Did I miss anything Steve?

Core Dump = Rudimentary skill - Well not exactly but go ahead and add that to the list.

Repairing the Core without the code = toggling the dip switches like they had to on the Apollo missions but you probably think that is a hoax also so it doesn't count.

Yeah, I got pissy. Getting tired of seeing Steve spew his erroneous information without any counterpoint. Anyone can find information on the internet to support their particular brand of crazy. Intelligent people actually listen and consider the opinions and viewpoints they disagree with.

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rhys jones 7 months, 1 week ago

As I have ventured in the past, I generally don't click links in these posts, especially Fox news, nor do I often include them in my posts. If you have something to say, say it, don't go begging to some false authority.

That said... and if I can claim any computer distinction, it would be this: Of all the people you know who work with computers, in any capacity, and there are many -- if you took the total money they have made at it, then divided in the hours they have invested, I have made less per hour than any of them. My current venture wilts on the vine.

I'm a jack-of-all-trades, master of none, and one-man band. I claim applications and database expertise, but have never used a complex outer join, always made select-where work. Whenever I Google a technical issue, expecially in the tech forums, I see so much unrelated techno about which I am currently clueless -- there's so much out there; it would be impossible to learn it all, more is developed every day than one could absorb -- and I realize just what a guppy I am, in deep waters.

So take me with a grain of salt, when I quote FDR: The only thing we have to fear, is fear itself.

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Chris Hadlock 7 months, 1 week ago

Given your excellent core dump skills i am sure you will have no problem deciphering this little ditty.

010000001101010010000101100010111000010010000101100100111001001101000000011110000100000010000010100000011010010010100010100010001000010010100100 0100000010000100100101111010100110101000

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rhys jones 7 months, 1 week ago

I'm starting to smell a rat.

I went against my religion and clicked on Steve's Frito-Lay link, read it three times, and didn't see his name mentioned anywhere. What were we supposed to pull from that?

"I once used a core dump... [once?] ...implemented the fix in machine code" I find hardly credible. If you can't find a reverse compiler that'll work, you're damn sure not going to backtrace or fix the problem in machine code. I've been programming applications for 40 years, and that's one of the bigger whoppers I've heard.

"65,000 dimensions on each of 3 different axes" long on jargon short on basis.

Re/Open Source "every third rate programmer in the world can contribute to the code" wrong again. Linux is overseen by an international panel. Any changes suggested for the shell are submitted to that committee. All Linux development occurs at Debian Linux. Once changes are approved and clear initial testing, they are incorporated in the Unstable release. That version contains the most advanced op sys on the planet. After so much time and wider use, they are moved up to the Testing release. More time and testing, finally they make it to the Stable release. This is the shell all the other distributions use -- Red Hat, Ubuntu, Knoppix, SuSE, etc. The only difference between distros is the wrapper, cosmetics, and ease of system administration. I use Ubuntu.

"this is a CLASSIC buffer overrun exploit which has been around for DECADES." From http://heartbleed.com/ (yeah a link, I'll quote out of it, verify if you want) "Bug was introduced to OpenSSL in December 2011 and has been out in the wild since OpenSSL release 1.0.1 on 14th of March 2012. OpenSSL 1.0.1g released on 7th of April 2014 fixes the bug."

"Only a third rate programmer would ever write any code which allowed for a buffer overrun exploit -- it's Computer Programming 101." Excuse me, I've been programming for 40 years, sometimes even for money, know at least 15 languages, and this is my first up-close encounter with a buffer overrun. Even doing my own sys admin for the last seven years, and developing and publishing my own venture solo over the last 20-plus. I must be third-rate. Or maybe I'm just skilled.

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rhys jones 7 months, 1 week ago

I notice all your buffer overrun links also include WIndows, and as I have repeatedly stated, I detest that can of worms, avoid it like the plague. It has never been an issue for me, admittedly at mostly upper-level programming.

If your lofty claims are true, then I am afraid you have become myopic -- that, or you are just a paranoid complainer with a lot of time on his hands. This isn't the first time we have witnessed the phenomenon.

You ain't from 'round here, ere ya?

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rhys jones 7 months, 1 week ago

Nobody said it was, anything can be cracked, it's cat-and-mouse. It's just that 99.9% of the spyware and viruses are written for Windows, because that's what most people use, and it has so many holes. It's so easy to slip an executable file into a download that will wipe out a hard drive it's not funny. Much trickier in Linux.

These feared (and largely imagined) attacks are sort of like mass shooters... it's indiscriminate who they hit, when they do strike, and your odds of being hit are low, out of all Creation. I don't let the fear of it stop me from living my life.

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rhys jones 7 months, 1 week ago

The Internet can trace its roots back through DARPA Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, late '50's. Dennis Ritchie and Brian Kernighan wrote the C language, working for Bell labs, then the Unix operating system, based in C. All DARPAnet/Internet development was done in this platform, and this is where it resides today.

Linus Torvalds wrote the first free Linux, a virtual clone of (proprietary) Unix.

All Internet standards -- all the RFC's, or Request For Comments, which dictate its behavior -- specifying TCP/IP protocols -- are based in Unix.

Windows uses the DOS operating system, which Bill bought from IBM some time back -- a necessarily-single-user op sys; every user spinning a hard drive (one Linux box can host 16,384 users). He had to pirate a platoon of programmers from Sun Unix just to get his can of worms to work with the (Unix-based) Internet, and to this day refuses to adhere to the standards -- every Internet Explorer version has its own quirks, none conform with everybody else, and web designers must make accommodations for each.

Windows ME was released with 33,000 KNOWN BUGS.

I tried for 10 years to get my Unix-based software to run on Windows, dial-up scripts, terminal emulators, with little or no success, they mix like oil and water. Finally I threw that version away and started totally over, saving only my precious numbers, using Open Source software, relying on the Internet to do the translation. I'm not playing Bill's game any more -- he's playing mine. (for all it gets me)

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john bailey 7 months, 1 week ago

that's all well and cool but , stop and watch the Avs game for goodness sake....~;0)

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