Mike Bailey, left, and Megan Cook vote at the polls Tuesday afternoon at Moffat County Courthouse.

Photo by Noelle Leavitt Riley

Mike Bailey, left, and Megan Cook vote at the polls Tuesday afternoon at Moffat County Courthouse.

Election: Secession question voted down in Moffat County

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Moffat – No 55 to 45 percent

Weld – No 58 to 42 percent

Logan – No 58 to 41 percent

Sedgwick – No 57 to 43 percent

Phillips – Yes 62 to 38 percent

Washington – Yes 58 to 42 percent

Yuma - Yes 59 to 41 percent

Elbert – No 74 to 26 percent

Lincoln – No 55 to 44 percent

Kit Carson - Yes 52 to 48 percent

Cheyenne – Yes 62 to 37 percent

Moffat County will not act to secede from Colorado. The voters came out against the measure, 55 to 45 percent.

Out of the 11 counties that put the question on the ballot, only five voted in favor of pursuing secession. Weld County, which was the first to put secession on the ballot, turned down the idea of leaving the state 58 to 42 percent.

Moffat County Commissioner John Kinkaid introduced the idea of putting the secession question to voters in Moffat County, but he wasn’t disappointed by the results, he said.

“I respect the decision of the voters here in Moffat County. I’ve always thought that Moffat County voters are very sharp and perceptive,” he said.

He even conceded that there were better options on the table than secession.

“Seeking more representatives for rural counties at the state Legislature is a better solution,” he said.

Moffat County had jumped on the secession movement in August when Kinkaid proposed joining the 51st State Initiative at a county commissioner meeting.

It caused controversy almost immediately. Craig City Council unanimously came out against secession, and County Commissioner Chuck Grobe disapproved of how the measure was introduced to the community, saying it wasn’t enough time for the county to contribute its input on the issue.

It was placed on the ballot after only a week for discussion.

Mayor Terry Carwile had been outspoken in his opposition to pursuing secession, so he was happy with the results, he said.

“I tell you I am pleased with that result. I am a little bit surprised that it got as much support as it did,” Carwile said.

It was evidence that Moffat County voters wanted to find a different method of resolving political differences, he added.

“By and large, they saw the failings of the question,” he said. “The political winds shift back and forth, and who’s to say what (Colorado) will look like at some point in the future.”

One of the reasons Kinkaid said he jumped on this issue was because he wanted to make a point to Front Range politicians and Gov. John Hickenlooper that rural Colorado needs to be heard.

Kinkaid argued that Moffat County still got its point across even though the question failed in the county.

“If I were the governor, I’d be taking that awfully seriously in my re-election campaign,” Kinkaid said. “If he stays on the far left running for re-election, he’s putting himself at risk politically.”

Erin Fenner can be reached at 970-875-1795 or efenner@craigdailypress.com.

Comments

Scott Wedel 11 months, 4 weeks ago

Yeah sure, Hickenlooper is worried about the less than 2,000 voters in Moffat County that voted for succession.

The basic issue is that democracy is based upon number of votes and not number of acres. So elections are almost always determined by the votes of the major population centers and not low population rural areas.

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