Wendy Puckett

Photo by Matt Stensland

Wendy Puckett

Locals 2013: Wendy Puckett

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Spend just a few minutes with Wendy Puckett, and you quickly feel like the world is yours.

Those who know Puckett closely describe her as kind, motivational, an eternal optimist and a woman and mother with the highest integrity.

“She’s a friend you deserve to have,” Puckett’s sister Kristin Stevenson says.

Friends and clients say her personality suits her profession as a trainer perfectly. She believes in the potential of her clients, and because of this, they work hard to achieve their goals.

“She just loves to see people feel successful,” Stevenson says.

Puckett says she and her two sisters were surrounded by inspiration growing up. Her dad, Bink Smith, spent his career at Nike during an era when the company exploded with endorsed athletes like Steve Prefontaine, Bo Jackson and Michael Jordan.

“We were the ‘Just Do It’ family,” Puckett says.

Puckett was a track star at the University of Colorado and worked at Nike for a year before a 10-year stint at PowerBar. It was her job to sign athletes and help build the company’s brand. While working there, she met her future husband, a ski racer named Chris Puckett who was one of PowerBar’s athletes. Together, they have two boys, Cole, 12, and Cooper, 10.

In 2001, she opened Steamboat Pilates, Yoga & Fitness with her sisters and dad. “There is a lot of purpose, goals and heart behind it,” Puckett says.

Helping youths and athletes in the community is her passion. Stevenson says it is not unheard of for her sister to be up until 2 a.m. developing programs and plans for clients.

Puckett also is a firm believer in giving back to the community. In early June, she helped organize the communitywide Sweat for Scott benefits for physical therapist Scott Blair, who was diagnosed in May with a brain tumor. She also hosts an annual Pilates-A-Thon, which raises money for youth athletic scholarships.

In 2008, Puckett and Stevenson collected 100 sentiments of gratitude from local students and had them printed on reusable grocery bags. The students then sold the bags to raise money for their schools.

Puckett says she is happy to give back to a community she loves.

“It’s one of the things that makes Steamboat so great,” Puckett says. “Everyone cares for Steamboat so much, and when you put your heart into it, everything feels better.”

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