Bill Betenson, back, 47, will be at the Museum of Northwest Colorado from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 6 to unveil his new book entitled “Butch Cassidy: My Uncle.” Betenson is the great-grandson of Lula Parker, Cassidy’s younger sister, and his book is full of stories about the famous outlaw not previously published.

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Bill Betenson, back, 47, will be at the Museum of Northwest Colorado from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 6 to unveil his new book entitled “Butch Cassidy: My Uncle.” Betenson is the great-grandson of Lula Parker, Cassidy’s younger sister, and his book is full of stories about the famous outlaw not previously published.

Butch Cassidy relative visits Craig for book-signing, discussion

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On July 27, 1897, Robert Leroy Parker, 31, more famously known as Butch Cassidy, traveled to the town of Baggs, Wyo.

Four months earlier, in April 1897, Cassidy and his closest friend, Elzy Lay, successfully had robbed a small group of Pleasant Valley Coal Company employees of $7,000 in gold near Castle Gate, Utah.

With the loot in hand, Cassidy and Lay rode into Baggs to meet the other members of the Wild Bunch for a celebratory gambling and drinking binge.

On one occasion, at Jack Ryan’s Bulldog Saloon in Baggs, the bandits shot the place up.

But before retiring for the evening, Cassidy paid Ryan $1 for each of the 25 bullet holes he and his gang fired into the bar, according to reports.

It was congenial dealings like the Bulldog Saloon incident that earned Cassidy a reputation among many Northwest Colorado and Wyoming residents as the “good” outlaw.

Although countless books have been written about Cassidy and stories surrounding his life inspired the 1969 fictional film “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,” many tales largely have gone untold, until now.

Read more at CraigDailyPress.com.

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