Hayden Granary owner Tammie Delaney hopes to turn the iconic Hayden building into a hub for arts, culture and economic revival. She is working on a business plan to turn the granary into a community coffee shop, and on Saturday, the building’s warehouse will host a barn dance.

Photo by Scott Franz

Hayden Granary owner Tammie Delaney hopes to turn the iconic Hayden building into a hub for arts, culture and economic revival. She is working on a business plan to turn the granary into a community coffee shop, and on Saturday, the building’s warehouse will host a barn dance.

Plans for community hub in Hayden Granary move forward

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Barn dance and Artposita artists showcase

  • Saturday, September 29, 2012, 6:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
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— Talk to Tammie Delaney about the Hayden Granary and you’re likely to be overcome by the wave of enthusiasm about the future of the building she owns with her husband, Patrick, the future of Hayden and the heritage of both that she sees as vital to her plans.

Repeating terms like catalyst, synergy and incubator, Delaney said closing Yampa Valley Feeds was part of the plan to focus on the bigger concept for the iconic building.

The first aspect of that is a coffee house, but that belies her much grander vision for the granary: a hub for arts, culture and economic revival in Hayden.

Noting she and her husband rushed into the feed store almost overnight without a formal business plan, Delaney said this time, she wants a strategy.

“I’d never seen the walls in here,” she said Tuesday about the renovations now taking place. “We just got it empty.”

Now, Delaney is researching the organizational setup of community-owned coffee shops in other towns with the intention of possibly bringing a shareholder approach to the shop in the granary. She hopes to have a business plan done by the end of the month.

The idea is to make the granary a community meeting place, she said. “A coffee house makes it all that much easier for people to pop in and out.”

Referencing the days when people would gather around a potbelly stove, Delaney said the granary has served a similar purpose for most of its existence. “Our intention is to take that past and to translate it into the future,” she said.

While the main building has been undergoing the transition from feed and tack to coffee, the east warehouse on the property has been used for special events, weddings, art shows and the recent homecoming dance. On Saturday, the warehouse will host a barn dance as part of Colorado Art Ranch's Art Posita. Artists who have spent the past month in residence in Hayden will showcase their work, and the band Sundog will provide music. The cost is $10.

But there’s even more space yet to be utilized, and Delaney wants to see it used in ways that incorporate the community. Whether that’s local culinary uses, artist space or other businesses remains to be seen, but she is getting some help with the long-term plan for the building.

Students from the University of Colorado Denver College of Architecture and Planning are using the granary as a project. Delaney said the final presentation of ideas for the granary will be in early December.

Axial Arts Architecture also will be occupying space in the building, Delaney said.

“It’s not about us. It’s about some amazing people around us that are great at helping us articulate this great vision,” she said about those in Routt County who also are helping with plans and ideas.

While the larger vision still is taking shape, new walls in the coffee house are going up, and flooring is being put down. “You’ll be able to see back into the granary,” Delaney said about the finished product. “It’ll tell the story of the granary.”

To reach Michael Schrantz, call 970-871-4206 or email mschrantz@SteamboatToday.com

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