Steamboat briefs: Rotary Club Barbecue and Barn Dance is on Sept. 22

Advertisement

The fifth annual Rotary Club of Steamboat Springs Community Barbecue and Barn Dance is Sept. 22 at Sidney Peak Ranch. The event features live music from Loose Change, food catered by Rex’s American Grill and Bar, and lots of raffle prize packages. The family oriented event includes kids activities, dancing and a photo station. Advance tickets are $35 per person or $70 for families of five or fewer ($10 for each additional child younger than 16). Proceeds from the Barn Dance benefit the Boys & Girls Club of Steamboat Springs and local charities funded by the Rotary Club of Steamboat Springs.

Officials reminds people to keep away from wildlife

The Colorado Division of Parks and Wildlife is reminding people to keep their distance from wild animals. Often, well-meaning people try to provide assistance to young animals that appear to be abandoned, according to a news release.

“We know most people mean well,” Erin Serfoss, Colorado Division of Parks and Wildlife customer service representative in Grand Junction, was quoted as saying. “But picking up a healthy, young animal and bringing it to us or a vet for help is often the worst thing they can do. In the majority of cases, the young animal is much better off left alone.”

Handling most wildlife also is illegal. People attempting to rehabilitate animals without authorization from Parks and Wildlife face stiff fines. Additionally, wildlife can carry diseases, and handling it can lead to human illness or serious injuries from scratches and bites from sharp teeth and claws, according to the release.

“For their own safety, as well as the safety of the animal, people should not handle wildlife,” Trina Romero, watchable wildlife coordinator for Parks and Wildlife, was quoted as saying. “If after careful observation, it appears that an animal does need human intervention, the best course of action is calling a wildlife officer.” 

Historical Guide to Routt County on sale at museum

The 2010 edition of the Historical Guide to Routt County is on sale at the Tread of Pioneers Museum. The guide is dedicated to the trappers and settlers, cattlemen and sheepmen, strawberry and lettuce farmers, miners and skiers who have made the Yampa Valley as rich in history as it is in natural beauty. An index and maps assure easy access to brief descriptions of the mountains, mines, stage stops, trails and ghost towns which played such an important role in the county’s history. Proceeds from the sale of the book support preservation and education activities at the museum. The museum is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Requires free registration

Posting comments requires a free account and verification.