Steamboat briefs: National Safety Awareness Week is Saturday to Jan. 22

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As part of National Safety Awareness Week from Saturday to Jan. 22, Steamboat Ski Area will host the following programs:

■ Meet patrol: The men and women who help keep the mountain safe will be on-site in Gondola Square from Saturday to Monday to provide additional information and answer questions about mountain safety.

■ Park rangers: The designers, testers and maintainers of Steamboat’s terrain parks will be in Gondola Square from Saturday to Monday sharing the Parkwise code.

■ Bear the Safety Dog: Steamboat’s safety mascot will be in Gondola Square from Saturday to Monday.

■ Snow safety/avalanche awareness: Steamboat Ski Patrol will host free seminars about snow safety and avalanche awareness at 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Meet at patrol headquarters at the top of Sundown Express chairlift.

■ Know the Code contest: Skiers and riders will be stopped on the slopes by members of ski patrol from Saturday to Jan. 22. If they know at least three of the seven parts of the Responsibility Code, they’ll receive a prize.

■ Billy Kidd 1 p.m. run: Free clinic by Steamboat’s director of skiing, who will be joined by ski patrol.

■ Free mountain tours: Join Steamboat’s ambassadors for SlopeWise and safety information from ski patrol at 10:30 a.m. at the top of Vagabond.

■ Free racing: Any skiers or riders who can tell the attendant one of the seven topics of the Responsibility Code races free at the NASTAR training course.

The National Ski Areas Association’s National Safety Awareness Week is an annual event highlighting resort safety education efforts across the country while increasing slope safety.

SportsMed recognized for its concussion program

SportsMed at Yampa Valley Medical Center was recognized for its concussion-management program this month in the American Hospital Association’s Community Connections publication, according to a news release.

The concussion-management program, which was launched in 2009, partners with physicians, physical therapists, athletic trainers, coaches, school counselors, nurses, teachers and families. It includes preseason and post-concussion cognitive testing to measure brain processing, speed, memory and visual motor skills, according to the release.

Lance Pugh — a SportsMed physical therapist, father and coach — was a leader in developing the concussion management program, according to the release.

“The role of a hospital is not simply to treat illness but to strengthen communities … by building strong families, fostering safety and creating opportunities for people to improve their lives,” the publication states.

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