Most people in Yampa realize that the Crossan’s M&A Market building, which was built in 1903, has seen better days. Despite the efforts of the Friends of Crossan’s, a group of Yampa locals who are working on restoring the Crossan’s building, the site was placed on Colorado’s Endangered Places list by Colorado Preservation Inc. With the designation, Crossan’s Market will receive more exposure. Specifically, Colorado Preservation will help with grant writing.

Photo by John F. Russell

Most people in Yampa realize that the Crossan’s M&A Market building, which was built in 1903, has seen better days. Despite the efforts of the Friends of Crossan’s, a group of Yampa locals who are working on restoring the Crossan’s building, the site was placed on Colorado’s Endangered Places list by Colorado Preservation Inc. With the designation, Crossan’s Market will receive more exposure. Specifically, Colorado Preservation will help with grant writing.

Crossan’s building in Yampa put on Most Endangered Places list

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— Colorado Preservation on Thursday listed Crossan’s M&A Market in Yampa as one of the year’s Most Endangered Places.

The designation helps add to the already burgeoning efforts of a group of Yampa residents who have made the market’s restoration a priority.

Since the town of Yampa bought the 108-year-old building on Main Street in 2006, the Friends of Crossan’s has worked to convert the building into a visitor and cultural heritage center, a town hall and an extension of the Yampa Historical Museum.

Thursday’s announcement helps the group that has raised about $15,000 for the project.

“It’s been an interesting process so far,” Friends of Crossan’s President Jeff Drust said. “This is an honor and another feather in our hat to help us achieve other goals. We’re just getting started.”

Drust said the group has had a historical structure assessment done and has applied for a National Historic Designation.

Colorado Preservation began producing in 1997 an annual list of Colorado’s Most Endangered Places in order to build awareness about historical buildings that were in danger of being lost.

Since its inception, the group has designated 94 sites as endangered. Of those, 30 have been saved, 39 are in the process of being saved, 21 remain endangered and four have been lost.

The process for the naming Crossan’s Market as endangered involved a regional and statewide search. There were 30 nominations, and six sites were selected this year.

The Crossan’s Market was selected in large part because of the work already done by Friends of Crossan’s.

“They’ve said, ‘This is important to our town,’” Most Endangered Places Director Patrick Eidman said. “We really like supporting those grass-roots efforts. They’ve already done major fundraising. They’ve typified what this effort is about.”

With the designation, Crossan’s Market will receive more exposure. Specifically, Colorado Preservation will help with grant writing.

Colorado Preservation works with CBS Denver Channel 4 to put together a short documentary about Crossan’s Market. The documentary will air on CBS’s Colorado Getaways show, which airs from 6 to 6:30 p.m. Saturdays.

Crossan’s Market was built in 1903 by Sam and Ed Bell from Cripple Creek during a building boom just before the railroad came through town in 1908. The building went through several incarnations as a store, including Bell, Canant & Castello; Buck & Son; and later Montgomery & Allen, when it was bought by Joe Montgomery and Howard Allen in 1935. When Robert Crossan bought half the store and Allen ended up selling his share, the building continued as Crossan’s M&A Market. In 1964, Montgomery repurchased the lot and used it as a storage space until the town bought it.

Crossan’s Market is the second Routt County building to be given the Most Endangered Places designation. The Rock Creek Stage Stop was designated in 2009 and eventually saved. It served as a halfway station on the first Wells Fargo mail route into the Yampa Valley and as a service center for settlers until the railroad line took over in 1887.

To reach Luke Graham, call 970-871-4229 or email lgraham@SteamboatToday.com

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