Despite the efforts of Friends of Crossan’s — a group of Yampa locals who are working on restoring the Crossan’s M&A Market building, which was built in 1903 — the site was placed on Colorado’s Endangered Places list by Colorado Preservation. A documentary about the historic market will air at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday on CBS Denver Channel 4.

Photo by John F. Russell

Despite the efforts of Friends of Crossan’s — a group of Yampa locals who are working on restoring the Crossan’s M&A Market building, which was built in 1903 — the site was placed on Colorado’s Endangered Places list by Colorado Preservation. A documentary about the historic market will air at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday on CBS Denver Channel 4.

TV documentary about historic Yampa market to air April 14

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Editor's note: The date the documentary is scheduled to air was incorrect in the original published version of this article. It has been corrected below.

A short documentary about the historic Crossan’s M&A Market in Yampa will air April 14 on CBS.

The market previously was designated as one of the year’s Most Endangered Places, and a short film was put together about the 108-year-old building on Main Street. The documentary airs at 6:30 p.m. April 14 on CBS Denver Channel 4.

“The whole series of films is pretty interesting,” said Jeff Drust, the president of Friends of Crossan’s.

Friends of Crossan’s learned in early February that the building, bought by the town of Yampa in 2006, would earn the Most Endangered Places designation from the group Colorado Preservation. Crossan’s was one of six state sites that earned the nomination this year.

The documentary features segments of the Crossan’s buildings, as well as interviews with Drust and Yampa residents Noreen Moore and Rita Herold. Herold details her time as a young girl in Yampa visiting the market.

Crossan’s Market was built in 1903 by Sam and Ed Bell, from Cripple Creek, during a building boom just before the railroad came through town in 1908. The building went through several incarnations as a store, including Bell, Canant & Castello; Buck & Son; and later Montgomery & Allen, when it was bought by Joe Montgomery and Howard Allen in 1935. When Robert Crossan bought half the store and Allen ended up selling his share, the building continued as Crossan’s M&A Market. In 1964, Montgomery repurchased the lot and used it as a storage space until the town bought it.

Drust said the group still is in the process of raising funds to fix up the old market. He said they have applied for numerous grants.

To donate to the project, contact Historic Routt County at 970-875-1305 or hrc@historicrouttcounty.org.

To reach Luke Graham, call 970-871-4229 or email lgraham@SteamboatToday.com

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