Our View: Getting ready for boom or bust

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Editorial Board, May 11 through Sept. 21, 2011

  • Scott Stanford, general manager
  • Brent Boyer, editor
  • Tom Ross, reporter
  • Laura Schmidt, community representative
  • Jim Miller, community representative

Contact the editorial board at 970-871-4221 or editor@SteamboatToday.com. Would you like to be a member of the board? Fill out a letter of interest now.

— It no longer is a question of if but rather when, how much and at what cost.

Increased oil and gas development is coming to Routt County, that much seems certain. If you’re not convinced, consider some of what has taken place over the past few months:

In February, the State Land Board auctioned multiyear leases of surface or subsurface mineral rights on 19 Routt County land tracts totaling more than 5,200 acres. The auction netted $4.2 million.

On May 18, a Texas limited liability company bought the 3,400-acre Bugler’s Ridge ranch outside Oak Creek for $7.1 million. The purchase was made sight unseen, and the listing real estate broker said he heard from Shell Oil and landmen representing other energy exploration companies before the transaction closed.

Colorado Division of Parks and Wildlife officers have conducted about 30 Routt County site visits with energy companies during the past couple months to analyze the potential impact of oil and gas operations on critical wildlife habitats.

Routt County planner Chris Brookshire, the county’s designee for oil and gas permitting requests and questions, has reported an increased number of inquiries from energy companies during the past few months. Last week, she reported having four completed permit applications on her desk.

Similarly, the county assessor’s office has been busy with oil landmen searching property records for land that extends over the Niobrara Shale layer.

Next week, the Routt County Board of Commissioners will vote on a permit application for Shell Oil to drill an oil and gas well near Yampa Valley Regional Airport in Hayden. If approved, the drilling would take place 24 hours a day for a four-week period.

There are other examples, but the point hopefully is clear: The oil and gas industry is gearing up for what could be a substantial power play here in Routt County. No matter what you think of domestic energy exploration and production, there are important factors that must be carefully weighed and considered, including the economic, environmental and social impacts that oil and gas operations could have in our county. Thankfully, some, like our county government, already have begun to consider the long-term impacts and prepare for a potential boom by examining existing regulations. But that should hardly be the end of it.

In Hayden today, the sold-out Northwest Colorado Oil and Gas Symposium moderated by state Sen. Jean White will feature a panel of speakers representing government, land owners, energy companies and scientists. And later this month, the Community Alliance of the Yampa Valley is planning its own public forum to discuss oil and gas issues.

We’re encouraged by these local efforts to bring awareness to what could be a defining issue for years to come, and they serve as a reminder that there’s certainly much more to be done in the ensuing months.

Comments

kathy foos 3 years ago

Of course they will be led by Jean White who was never even elected.

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kathy foos 3 years ago

Buglers Ridge drilling better not ruin my well water source at Phippsburg or you will be so sued,sight unseen.Oh! dont mess up the air quality with cancer causing chemicals.Is our envirmental health department going to monitor the air like in Rifle where they discovered cancer causing chemicals in the air by grade schools?These oil companys are hoping you are ignorant and just love..em.Is Routt county getting private well water sample's taken before they turn loose "Mordor on us?"Stay away from P-Burg, oil and gas people,I totally dont want your hell.

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the_Lizard 3 years ago

It could be an incredible economic boon for Routt county. It's a great thing people, don't believe the scare tactics.

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Jeff_Kibler 3 years ago

Gasland is just about as credible as Sicko. Total utter nonsense! They've both been debunked every which way from Sunday.

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Steve Lewis 3 years ago

Given that domestic wells are the noted problem at lower altitudes, we should be additionally concerned here.

We have a steep "water gradient" in these higher elevations. Generally ground water moves more quickly toward our drinking water supply here. Steeper hillsides are part of the picture, but its also a function of coarser soils and drainages lacking fine grained silts and clayey soils. The finer soil types slow and filter water, providing clean water for domestic water wells. Lower altitudes have abundant filtering soils. We have less.

Please do not allow any chemical fracking in the drinking watersheds for our Routt communities.

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Jeff_Kibler 3 years ago

If you want to effect change in the oil patch, get a job with an oil and gas company. You'll learn a lot about how environmentally conscious most of these companies really are. If you find out differently, blow the whistle. Instead of taking cheap shots aimed with ignorance, get in there and discover the facts.

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Steve Lewis 3 years ago

In the Rockies we should consider a broader question. As these gas wells approach the high country, they approach the clean water supply many states rely on.

There is not much we can do for the low point aquifers of the flatlands, with 100's of jurisdictions affecting that water quality. But we can do something about the water quality at the source. These chemicals should be declared and tested before we inject them into our water table.

Rushing to extract fuel in a way that fouls our drinking water is pure folly. particularly when you consider this is also a rush to take these fuels from our grandchildren.

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Jeff_Kibler 3 years ago

lewi, you bring up a good point. If these resources are indeed limited, and we're taking them from our grandchildren, aren't we simultaneously robbing them of their futures with our profligate uber-spending?

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sledneck 3 years ago

Typical leftist. Try to bend an argument into "taking from our grandchildren" but they don't give a d**n about doing irreperable harm to those same grandkids in the economic arena. Our kids will have plenty of oil to give to the chineese for the debt we are racking up. Brilliant!

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Steve Lewis 3 years ago

Jeff, These are not seriously your defense of fracking in Routt county. Get a job with Haliburton? Debate the deficit?

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the_Lizard 3 years ago

I completely agree Jeff, although I suppose if someone cared that deeply about oil and gas production they might look into it more in depth without having to actually work for them.. Just for curiosity sake, don'tchaknow. Lewi, here is a quick read on fracking and how it doesn't effect our water sources because; well, it's a matter of thousands of feet and a whole lot of cement encasing http://anga.us/media/206825/hydraulic%20fracturing%20101.pdf Even though some may say, but it's a big oil site, it's a Koch brothers conspiracy or something, this explanation is factual. Furthermore, there have been NO confirmed cases of contamination of drinking water through the fracking process here in CO.

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Jeff_Kibler 3 years ago

lewi, Halliburton is a service company. Just like Schlumberger. They are not oil companies, yet they assist in the exploration and production of hydrocarbons.

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Steve Lewis 3 years ago

Lizard, Tried your link to America's Natural Gas Alliance, got a blank page. If I care deeply about this, I should rest on the assurances of the corporations doing it?

How should I take this spill in April: http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/energy/coal-oil-gas/pennsylvania-fracking-accident-what-went-wrong-5598621

and,

"Recently, the Delaware River Basin Commission imposed a moratorium on all natural gas drilling within the watershed." http://whyy.org/cms/news/regional-news/2010/07/27/in-pa-the-fate-of-“fracking”-depends-on-what-river-you-live-near/42616

We should not rush into this. Fair enough?

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David High 3 years ago

We all have a great deal to gain or lose with the potential increase in drilling. I read the county regulations and we, Routt County, are ahead of the curve. Water and air quality tests before and after drilling are required. Water quality has to be tested within a two mile area (if I remember correctly). That being said, I have a brother that does PR for a mining company and a sister does writes for a water works trade journal. I also spoke to a geologist that works for oil and gas companies. The common take away I see is that the oil and gas industry does not have to be held to the same standard as all other companies. Why do the oil and gas companies not have to disclose the chemicals they are using? Why is Hydraulic Fracturing exempt from the disclosures Safe Drinking Water Act? There is a ton of really good information out there. Look at the county regulations; look at the articles that are published in main stream media. I believe that the information available will lead people to logical conclusions. I also realize that there is a lot of emotion behind many opinions.

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1999 3 years ago

check out whats going on in PA. if you want the truth on fracking.

it's truly sad what has happened to communities.

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the_Lizard 3 years ago

What has happened to communities in PA, 1999? This is what I found: http://www.strongerinc.org/documents/PA%20HF%20Review%20Print%20Version.pdf "Hydraulic fracturing has been used in Pennsylvania since the 1950s. Since the 1980s, nearly all wells drilled in Pennsylvania have been fractured. Although thousands of wells have been fractured in Pennsylvania, DEP has not identified any instances where groundwater has been contaminated by hydraulic fracturing. DEP and Pennsylvania State University are currently conducting various groundwater studies and investigations to determine whether there are adverse impacts associated with hydraulic fracturing." Lewi, click on the link a couple times it will work, same thing happened to me. I liked it because the graphics are good. It is factual in how fracking works, so find the information somewhere else if you want, but it will be the same info. boohoo, How are gas and oil companies not held to the same standards, and what standards are you talking about....Just was wondering.

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exduffer 3 years ago

Man, I sure do yearn for the days of Encyclopedia Britannica. And don't forget World Book for the younger crowd.

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Andrew Bisbee 3 years ago

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=us-investigates-safety-of-natural

"A U.S. Congressional report released in April showed that the 14 most active hydraulic fracturing companies in the United States together used nearly 3 billion liters of fracking fluid, not including water. The products contained at least 29 chemicals that are known or possible human carcinogens."

http://www.propublica.org/article/buried-secrets-is-natural-gas-drilling-endangering-us-water-supplies-1113

"In Garfield County, there were signs this was already happening. Animals that had produced offspring like clockwork each spring stopped delivering healthy calves, according to Liz Chandler, a veterinarian in Rifle, Co. A bull went sterile, and a herd of beef cows stopped going into heat, as did pigs. In the most striking case, sheep bred on an organic dairy farm had a rash of inexplicable still births -- all in close proximity to drilling waste pits, where wastewater that includes fracturing fluids is misted into the air for evaporation."

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David High 3 years ago

Lizard, in answer to your question... is there any industry that can do what the oil and gas industry is doing and not have to report what they are putting into the ground? Have you been to the Milner dump and read what you have to sign when you are dumping? Do you know what you have to do if you spill oil off your boat in the ocean?

It was said to me that there will be spills and accidents; you are after all, drilling through ground water on the way... The EPA does not regulate this industry as I understand it. I don't think approval should be allowed until there is more research and disclosure, which I think is on the way. Until then... they are blowing and goin'. I believe there is more to lose than to gain, but then again, I am blessed to have a good job and it is not an entirely fair statement to those that need to put food on the table.

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pitpoodle 3 years ago

Oh yes, the EPA. A truly useless, money wasting organization.

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the_Lizard 3 years ago

Lewi, I read the article from Popular Mechanics concerning the worst Fracking accident in PA history. (the slanted stuff from huffpo, msnbc, nrdc, and various other blogs and opinion pieces are NWMT) What was the result, were people killed ,was the environment harmed for generations, were they able to clean it up, was it worse than all the salty water that naturally occured as a result of hurricane Irene? Accidents happen, so does naturally occuring destruction, it's part of life, we learn from them and moved on. So your relatives can light their tap water on fire, as a result of fracking or some other naturally occuring phenomenon? The ONE instance of tap water being lit on fire in Weld county that Gasland made such a big deal out of was not as a result of fracking, biz, one vet says that she sees cows no longer in heat old sterile bulls and so on because of fracking, Come on, I thought the left was all about science, does this have any scientific basis other than because I said so. BS and pardon the pun, but I need more eveidence then one agenda driven Vet saying she is seeing the sky falling and she knows why. boohoo, Of course government agencies know waht's in fracking liquids, and of course gas and oil is regualted by the EPA, and every other government agency that may be related to the industry.

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1999 3 years ago

so lizard...anything wrotten by an actual person is (in your opinion) an "opinion piece" and thus not factual? carries no merrit?

gotcha...

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rhys jones 3 years ago

I have remained mum up 'til now, being largely ignorant of fracking concerns, until I consulted with my own mum. She's 84 next week, born in Glenwood and raised in Rifle, now living in Parachute -- drilling central. Plus she worked for the EPA for many years, personally responsible for every public water supply in Wyoming serving more than 10 people -- guest ranches, cities, motels -- travelled to all, in the summers -- cool gig.

So I was surprised to hear her being dubious about the EPA, says she hasn't heard of the inspector out of Denver being in that region in 6 or 7 years that she knows of; he's in Washington playing politics. Her personal jury is still out on any health risks with drilling; nothing conclusive has been established, and both sides are well-documented, as we are seeing in this forum. So she can't offer any solutions there either.

She did mention dust and noise concerns, and the fact that we will soon be bombarded by Mexicans again, housing will skyrocket and become scarce, The deer and wild turkeys don't like it, soon disappear, but such is progress.

On the brighter side, jobs will be plentiful, laborers starting at $20/hr. Woo Hoo!!

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spidermite 3 years ago

Highway. I think your sorce of information is the best yet. I live on 132 just South of 19. Just over the cliffs ( As the vulture flies) I'll keep you posted about the noise and dust. My road had better be paved before you add extra traffic or move equipment on it! I'll have my well tested before, during and if I live long enough after all the drilling. You know I'll keep you posted!!

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David High 3 years ago

Here is what I think is an objective article... others may disagree. It is from February of 2011 and I think the photo is taken from I-70 near Rifle.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/27/us/27gas.html?pagewanted=all

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the_Lizard 3 years ago

Tha's right 1999, no ones opinion counts but mine. HA I just want the truth, someone's anectdotal infomation which isn't necessarily based on scientific fact, just isn't very convincing. Of course that's just my opinion. For instance the PA document I posted is much more credible then an MSNBC "I hate gas and oil" rant piece. JMO. Increased energy exploration is coming to Routt county, apparently. We will have to rely on our county commisioners and the planning dept. to make good decisions in regrards to it. (perhaps we are doomed after alll) Anyway, it's better to be armed with real facts and real knowledge rather than someone's opinion. That's why I do try to back up what I say with facts. Like this; for biz, lookey what your vet story reminds me of: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMKFLJ...

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1999 3 years ago

facts are in the eye of the beholder.

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Scott Wedel 3 years ago

Seems to me that the NYT article pointed out that the wastewater from fracking can contain stuff that water treatment plants are not prepared to handle.

Seems straightforward enough for the County Commissioners and County Environmental Health to monitor that. Unlike some other counties, Routt is wealthy enough to have that dept staffed with knowledgeable people.

Now they test and verify the concrete seals around the drilling pipe to seal off different layers of groundwater. So it seems to me that a regulated and monitored fracking operation can be expected to be safe.

I would hope that if we are going to have local production that we can get local pricing by avoiding the pipeline charges. But are we stuck with Atmos with statewide rates and so would make more on the gas sold here than they would for gas in Denver?

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rhys jones 3 years ago

Could somebody tell me why the County Commissioners couldn't outlaw hydro-fracking in Routt County? Some Federal law probably trumps us, but here again I am ignorant; that just seems the proper thing to do here.

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the_Lizard 3 years ago

Scott, municipal water treament plants are not used in CO for "produced water" disposal.

http://cogcc.state.co.us/

YVB: Amount of water used from the COGCC website

"How much water is used to frac a well? Water is the primary component of most fracing fluids. The amount of water needed to frac a well in Colorado depends on the geologic basin, the formation, and the well. For example, approximately 50,000 to 300,000 gallons may be used to frac a shallow coalbed methane well in the Raton Basin, while approximately 800,000 to 2 million gallons may be used to frac a deeper tight sand gas well in the Piceance Basin. In the DJ Basin, approximately 250,000 gallons may be used to frac a vertical well, while up to 5 million gallons may be used to frac a horizontal well. How much is one million gallons of water? One million gallons is the amount of water consumed by: A 1,000 megawatt coal-fired power plant in 2.5 hours A golf course in 5 days 1.5 acres of corn in a season'

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Steve Lewis 3 years ago

So how does the County monitor for fracking chemical problems? Ask Halliburton to take notes for you?

And when a problem is found in a creek or some rancher's water well. The remedy is?

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Colette Erickson 3 years ago

Wow - watch the youtube fracking video and read the NY Times article - very scary stuff. Anyone who believes the industry propaganda is a fool.

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the_Lizard 3 years ago

The industry, 3canines, does NOT make up the entire COGCC, and that is who oversees the oil and gas industry here in CO. In case you have enough interest to look and read the fricking fracking facts!
http://cogcc.state.co.us/ Oh well, carry on folks.

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sedgemo 3 years ago

This opinion piece is should more accurately be titled Boom AND Bust, as this is the historical order of events. What's left when it's over? Are the profits worth the losses, or can they at least be more carefully balanced so land values (other than mineral) are not destroyed and left useless for generations to come in the process?

I've worked in extractive industries but have little faith in "thousands of feet of cement casing..." which calls to mind the unfortunate BP scenario in the Gulf.

What happens in the event of a failure here?

I have no answers, no land and no minerals, but grew up in the Rockies and possess many many questions at this time.

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StillMissTheBoat 3 years ago

One of the biggest players in the shale gas fracking business filled in a stream and bulldozed a waterfall in order to build a road to a hydrofracking site in West Virginia:

http://theintelligencer.net/page/content.detail/id/557984/Chesapeake-Still-Dealing-On-Filling-Streams.html?nav=5233

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Colette Erickson 3 years ago

Heh, Lizard. Can you say lobbyists, political contributions, schmoozing, political pressure, back-room deals, high-paid flunky lawyers, LIES, and money, money, money? That is the industry. Does anyone really think all that sort of BS doesn't influence what happens? Perhaps one or all of the foregoing factors might be why the contents of fracking fluids are not required to be fully disclosed, and that requirements for full disclosure are fought against tooth and nail. If it is so "fricking fracking" safe, what are they hiding?

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the_Lizard 3 years ago

Hey 3canines, can you say PROVE your slanderous comments. For instance tell us about this man. Is he ,in fact, an oil industry lobbyist, does he give to pro oil politicians, tell me about the back room deals he's made. Is he a lawyer, what lies has he told? Does he work for........Haliburton....

"Richard D. Alward Alward will to serve as a member with formal training or substantial experience in soil conservation or reclamation, west of the Continental Divide, and as a Democrat. He is a principal ecologist and environmental scientist at Aridlands Natural Resource Consulting in Grand Junction and works as an adjunct instructor of environmental science at Mesa State College. He previously worked as an ecologist at the U.S. Geological Survey – Biological Resources Division in Moab, Utah; as associated director at Cedar Point Biological Station at the University of Nebraska; and as a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Nebraska. Alward earned both a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree from the University of Nebraska and a doctorate from Colorado State University." You'll soon know what's in fracking fluid: http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_18601083 Hickenlooper said that the concerns over fracking were overblown and not based on science. The risk of the fracking process contaminating groundwater is "close to zero," he said. Or look here since you are so gravely concerned and need immedate answers: http://fracfocus.org/ Hmm?

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Colette Erickson 3 years ago

Oh, mea culpa, I forgot about Saints Mobile, Exxon, BP, Sinclair, and all the rest. How silly of me to ever doubt the veracity of what they tell us, and their good intentions towards us!

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David High 3 years ago

Liz, I met a geologist that works for the oil and gas industry and they pretty much said the opposite to your facts. So back to 1999's comments, "the facts are in the eye of the beholder".

A "close to zero" perspective seems dangerous. That is what they said about deep water drilling and the controls that were suposedly in place. Money drives the regulation, money will be the demise of clean water, and peace and quiet. If I were a home owner near Saddle Mountain Ranchettes, I wouldn't be very thrilled about the drilling that may happen in my back yard... http://www.steamboattoday.com/news/2011/sep/12/drilling-permit-sought-saddle-mountain-routt-count/

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the_Lizard 3 years ago

This geologists said what, in opposition to my facts? The thing is, there is going to be ongoing energy exploration efforts in Routt county, if you oppose it, shouldn;t you be armed with something other than innane comments that some have posted here. ie the COGCC is made up, in it's entirety, of energy insiders who are all bought off and only care about money. Or, "we'll soon be bombarded by Mexicans again" (hoghwaystar, I like your comments generally, but this....) Or, their wives will be wearing fur coats because of fracking or some other utter nonsense. Or ,someone in West Virginia bulldozed a stream and waterfall and so on and so forth. If you were to have a legitiment complaint and viable reason to oppose fracking on your next door neighbor's land, it seems to me you'd want to know the rules and regs, how fracking works, what your rights are here in CO and be able to support your case logically. not with emotional rants. Nothing is 100% boohoo, and fracking is certainly not 100% accident and problem free. That's why there have been a series of regulations put in place to help prevent; and in the worst case scenerios deal with the problems as they occur. My kids are 4th generation Routt County land owners, I wouldn't advocate anythig that I thought would hurt my property. I'd rather have a short term fracking operation as a neighbor than this: http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-3iGKtb8h1R0/TZHx_X2IgOI/AAAAAAAAAAU/TqgmzpIjfCs/s1600/68041492.pWeiwYP1.IMG_3359_1windmills.jpg or this: http://info.ussolarinstitute.com/Portals/92531/images/BCE_Rinehart-Rooftop-Solar-Farm-resized-600.jpg or these: http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_GFeMYOcnQuM/SiDvMkG0RaI/AAAAAAAAAOw/y-4o41LGyGI/s400/fat_ugly_people.jpg ;-)

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StillMissTheBoat 3 years ago

Wyoming's smog exceeds Los Angeles' due to gas drilling. Residents complain of watery eyes, shortness of breath, and bloody noses.

http://content.usatoday.com/communities/greenhouse/post/2011/03/wyomings-smog-exceeds-los-angeles-due-to-gas-drilling/1

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Steve Lewis 3 years ago

Lizard, you say, "there have been a series of regulations put in place to help prevent; and in the worst case scenerios deal with the problems as they occur."

But there is real risk that some gas wells' leaks, injecting this fracking chemistry into Routt soil and water formations, will not be discovered as they occur, but after they are gone, a decade or three later when some downstream test picks it up. How do we deal with that?

You have so much faith in these companies to do the right thing. I have NO TRUST that the energy extraction companies will do right by the local water users. But don't bother with my predjudice, when you can read Wednesday's news:

"BP at fault for 21 of 35 factors in Gulf spill, panel finds." 35 corners cut, Lizard.

"The explosion ... and spill "were the result of poor risk management, last-minute changes to plans, failure to observe and respond to critical indicators, inadequate well control response, and insufficient emergency bridge response training by companies and individuals responsible for drilling at the Macondo well and for the operation of the Deepwater Horizon" drilling rig, the report stated.

Of particular note was the cement seal put in place the day before the explosion in the Gulf of Mexico."

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44514842/ns/us_news-environment/

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sledneck 3 years ago

Lewi, What about the gasoline leak at the Sinclair? Do you have any idea how many tankers full of gasoline and diesel come over Rabbit Ears every week? Are those without risk? Didn't the entire nation go through a gasoline holding tank replacement campaign a couple decades ago? Wasn't that because those tanks were leaking in alarming numbers? Yet we are still here and we have drinking water and fish and birds and gas... hmmm?, Curious!

There were many mines here decades ago. The people here turned the land upside down for miles and polluted the hell out of everything in sight. Yet, here we are now with cleaner water, cleaner air and more energy than ever before. So the chicken-littles are probably wrong.

It has been said that "a fool knows the price of everything and the value of nothing". So too with this hyper-paranoia about anything that might get us more energy. Frankly, I believe the greens want us all to freeze to death and starve rather than exploit the earth at all.

I'm just finishing a book on that particular subject. It's called "Green Hell" by Steven Milloy. Shows how the greens want no growth so they say everything is "dangerous". They have worked tirelessly to kill solar, wind, nuclear, wind, ethanol and hydro projects. And I mean just as aggressively as they oppose oil, nat gas, coal and all other conventional sources. Bottom line... they lie and they want to scare people into extinction.

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Steve Lewis 3 years ago

Sled, You and the book make the same mistake - characterizing those you disagree with. That route is a fundamental waste of time.

For one, it completely avoids the actual issue, and two, the characterization is never the truth. An easy example to the value of "Green Hell": Few in this website fit its description of "Green" better than I. So explain to me why the vast majority of my votes as a planning commissioner were FOR growth. And if I no longer fit the book's pigeonholes, who does?

We survived the gas leaks and mine tailings. That's your argument in support of fracking? Or is it an argument that more regulation is good.

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sledneck 3 years ago

Isn't it ..."those with whom you disagree" ??

Surviving the gas leaks and mine tailings is my argument that we will survive the next so-called catastrophe. In the 1970's we were all told that there was an ice-age comming. We survived that too!

What, my friend, would we look like now if we had plunged head-long into trying to warm the globe to combat THAT fales threat? Hmmmm?

I do not advocate zero regulation. Thats a fools position. But there was a physician that put it quite aptly some centuries ago when he said "Everything is poision; the poision is in the dose". (ie amount) Regulation alone is not the poision with which I disagree but todays amount of regulation is another stoory. We have taken regulation so far as to make it lethal to business, to freedom, to common sense and to humanity itself. My point is simply that there are risks in EVERY venture manknid undertakes. Don't you support the Shuttle program? You know that killed a significant percentage of the astronauts who tried it?

Now, Lewi, please tell me... What IS the " actual issue"???

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sledneck 3 years ago

I think it goes deeper than water quality. I think the issue is better considered to be the availability of, and quantities of reasonable quality water. After all, all the pure water on Earth is no good if it's off-limits to humans, which seems to me to be where we are heading. So too are all other resources, since they all are hiding in, behind, below or around water.

I agree that the risk of water contamination is worth being very careful in the fracking process. All I'm saying is that there is an even larger risk in NOT fracking or not drilling for oil, etc, too. That risk is that we are going to see energy prices so high as to hold back economic development; the result of which will be an energy rich but economically impoverished nation. THATS where we are headed with all the green non-sense.

And while the risk of water contamination from fracking is real, it is small. However, the risk of crushing our economy with all the green, hand-wringing bs is 100%.

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