Craig hotel accused of racial discrimination against whites

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The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has filed suit on behalf of three fired white workers against the owners of a Craig hotel the agency alleges discriminated against them.

The lawsuit, filed last week in federal court in Denver, claims the owners of the Hampton Inn franchise in Craig fired the workers because they are white and “it was their impression that such workers are lazy,” the case filing states.

The Hampton Inn suit accuses the hotel’s owners, Century Shree Corp. and Century Rama Inc. — as well as those companies’ owners, Falgun Patel, Mukund Patel and Piyush Patel — of race discrimination.

According to the complaint, the hotel hired the three workers — Wendy Buckley, Ashlee Flannery and Dewetta McKnight — shortly before it opened in 2009 to work in the laundry and housekeeping departments. All three workers were fired later that year and replaced by Latino employees. By the end of the year, all workers in the laundry and housekeeping departments were Latinos, according to the complaint.

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Comments

John St Pierre 2 years, 10 months ago

Fascinating to say the least. I would hope that all the employee's there are checked for their immigration status..especially to see if their E-Verify documentation is valid. Sort of joke around here... E-Verify as long as you have the "paper" ID's... employeers do not have to worry even when they know what they are being given is bogus ID's

White vs Latino or living wage verse cheap wage..... or maybe proper payroll verses cash under the table.... this will be fun to watch what comes out......

Just wish the laws would be enforced across th board.....

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MrTaiChi 2 years, 10 months ago

Race. An ugly thing in human relations. This seems a little like a "man bites dog!" story, as there is a culture of the left that acts as though only people of color can be victims or rather, that only white people can be victimizers. For instance, there was righteous outrage at the inhumanity of South Afrikan laws enacted by whites to control blacks resulting in sanctions and regime change. Where is the equivalent outrage at state sponsored terror against white farmers in Zimbabwe? Why to Hindu women in South Asia and here in the USA get a pass on putting a red spot on their forehead to symbolize, A) their top caste status or B) their religious devotion, when women born into other castes can't show their religious devotion in such a way? Why does the National Organization of Women oppose marital rape here, but remain silent about the subjugation, abuse and mutilation of women in Muslim cultures? Why does the world environmental left get apoplectic about the exploitation of resources by western companies, but remain silent when indigenous peoples of Africa threaten endangered species by eating them when they have conventional sources of protein available.

I'm glad to see the law enforced without application of some prosecutorial discretion based on political correctness. After all, didn't Martin King say that a man should be judged by the content of his character, not the color of his skin?

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rhys jones 2 years, 10 months ago

The Indian-owned fleabags in Flagstaff are a dime a dozen and litter the roadsides, and I guess even the Iron Horse was owned by Indians, the real kind, not Native Americans. Indians, Chinese, Mexicans: Get used to them, as "globalization" slowly dissolves our borders, more accounts for the World Bank, the ultimate benefactor, along with the Chinese, who will walk off with the prize, you watch.

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bubba 2 years, 10 months ago

That's some quality bigotry there Rhys, good work!

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kathy foos 2 years, 10 months ago

People that can stand up and prove these things are great americans bettering the "republic"(thanks rhys) with laws that are already here.Its like Jackie Gleason would say,"How sweet it is!" Those are the jobs I do also and cant get hired,the jobs nobody wants they say(the jobs that they must pay full taxes on for americans).Untill the little people speak up for this county it cannot heal.How about those "Wall Street Zombies?"

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sledneck 2 years, 10 months ago

This case will go nowhere. White people can't be victims of racism.

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Kristopher Hammond 2 years, 10 months ago

Ever heard of the term "Patel Motel"? Ever stayed in one? Yes you have, many times. They've gone corporate, may Vishnu bless them!

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Jason Miller 2 years, 10 months ago

They fired american citizens,forget race for a second.The reason is clear.The ILLEGALS are worked like slaves and almost never talk back or report abuse from these people.It a sad but true reality in are country now days.I hope the owners lose everything they are scam to get.Hell why you're at it lets get the IRS nosing around.

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Brian Kotowski 2 years, 10 months ago

For roughly half of the '90s, a friend of mine ("Nick") had a govt contract erecting telephone & power poles in the American Southwest. Brutal, backbraking labor, in the searing desert heat, but it paid well. The lowest paid of his employees cleared nearly 50k in 7 months.

Nick initially started with a crew of friends and associates. It didn't take him long to determine that the hardest working, most productive & reliable people available to him hailed from south of the border. All were scrupulously documented, to satisfy the requirements of the contract, and to survive the unannounced inspections conducted regularly by INS.

To this day, Nick will always consider an Hispanic somewhat more favorably than a Caucasian.

It's not hard to understand how others might assign a higher value than we do to what we've always taken for granted.

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sledneck 2 years, 10 months ago

Race is not what motivates men. I worked a crew of white and black men for 17 years and I got most of them to work like they were putting out fire 12 hours every day (including saturdays, holidays, over 100 degrees, even in hurricanes!).

What motivates men is pay vs alternatives. Most of the men that worked for me could not pass a high-school ged exam so they had few alternatives. But they were HIGHLY skilled at their particular trade and I saw to it that they earned a great deal more than they would anywhere else. It was, for them, kind of like working for a union as far as the pay was concerned, but like working for a sledneck as far as the working conditions were concerned. It made them and me more than ANY alternative. Thats what made it happen.

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Scott Wedel 2 years, 10 months ago

Well, having worked for a worldwide data networking company that predated the internet, it was interesting how some of the Asian countries had basically accepted our racial stereotypes as facts.

So while I do not condone this, it is not surprising. India still has not gotten rid of the caste system and so still people of the top castes would never consider working in low paying jobs with people of lower castes. The Indian owners believe the stereotypes they read in the press from politicians saying that Americans do not want low paying jobs and so do figure something must be wrong with the whites that work these jobs.

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rhys jones 2 years, 10 months ago

Please let me not be misconstrued; my biases are like my dirty laundry, here for all to see.

I have toiled alongside Mexicans and Blacks -- primarily the former -- breaking virgin desert for new electrical conduit, and smoothing new road and parking-lot surfaces for the excavators -- either moving the big rocks in front of the equipment, or out of the way, depending. I know a worker, and our Mexican friends are among the best. That's why Dad preferred illegals as tenants, so much less trouble, and enough about that.

Dad was biased, initially, growing up in Oklahoma, which I hopefully successfully mostly corrected in later years; he got quite tolerant. But before that, I, as a child of 6 or so, I uttered a racial slur at the girl ahead of me at the line for the drinking fountain, who was at least a year older than me, and she proceeded to thrash me with a water-soaked towel, leading me to realize: These people don't see things the same way. I wish I could hug that girl today.

Ever since I have been most cognizant of minorities' concerns, and indeed some of my black friends have helped me, when my own race disappointed. I won't mention mi amigos, and some of the things we did.

All I'm saying is, the East Indians are one of the most prejudicial races of all. We are their pawn, our economy, to be exploited -- like everybody else, get it while you can.

My web server last year was called JaguarPC, a very organic name, and I subscribed, thinking they were American. There was no support number; I had to email my bugs, then 12 hours later somebody named Ahmud would reply. Often they claimed they didn't support my packages, and I was on my own. Uncounted times, I would attempt to log into my own site, only to get "Site not found" and I'd have to give it a kick-start myself. How long had it sat like this? How many customers did I lose as a result? Think Ahmud cares?

GoDaddy is in Tempe, Americans, they answer their phone, the heck with India, eh?

As a psychology amateur, I know it's conditioning, as much as genetics, which makes up a person's character. Which makes me wonder what's going on in India.

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seeuski 2 years, 10 months ago

Immigrants do tend to work harder and complain less than their American counter parts but the quality of their work is where I saw a difference, much less skilled and mistake prone. As an auto salvage yard owner for years I dealt with it all. Bad or great help comes in all flavors. The issue should be whether they are legally here or not, and if the Hotel owners fired those Whites for compensatory factors and not work ethic. Time will tell.

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MrTaiChi 2 years, 10 months ago

No finger pointing here, but I learned a hard lesson once that positive sterotypes are just as racist as negative ones. It means among other things that the author of the remark is prone to sterotyping, which in another conversation could turn negative. I don't anguish over this concept when deciding whether or not to take a 11 PM stroll in a bad neighborhood, however. That said, I qualify my following life experiences by saying that they are three data points in a graph of millions.

I worked on the railroad with two black men my age, two of the hardest working guys I ever met. Stan had survived Khe Sahn, a misspelled name that will mean something to only a few of you. We had a white thug working with us who was a bully, went to jail for a couple of months for beating up his eight month pregnant wife, and generally menaced the co-workers, until he stuck his dirty toe over the line into Stan's territory.

Charles H. busted his ass until he caught the attention of supervisors who put him on a training track to get out of the yard and have a career.

Al F. worked an eight hour day and then had a second job where I briefly worked part time. He was smart, knowledegable and prejudice free, although we had a polite debate about whether the Beatles could have 'soul'.

Do I have prejudices? Hell yes! Do I strive to be a better human being than that? Most times, and when I don't I am ashamed of my thoughts on reflection. We are entitled to the privacy of our thoughts, but when prejudice translates into violation of the law, then there should be no shelter for our actions.

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kathy foos 2 years, 10 months ago

All races have good and bad workers.This is about housekeepers going broke in a hospitality world of work ,because foreign and local companys save money and cheat the tax system to their advantage,and they think we wont speak up.We are some of the ones that lost our homes and are going hungry in many instances(I know I do ).We are being waited on in business by visa workers that are only supposed to get the extras and Valley employers have tweeked the system to run these employees off(who helped establish this hospitality business in the Valley)they loose their homes and the other low wages workers that are cheaper to pay taxs on get to buy them up .It has been extermination of locals.You all just let it be.Sounds dramatic,filthy, but true. What else have these girls suffered?Did they loose a home that they were trying to save because they went to work and got accused of being a bad worker and fired.Did their kids miss xmas presents or Moffat County have to help withy foodstamps,WHEN THEY SIMPLY WANTED TO WORK?The employers wont change.You have to force their dumb-asses.So be it,have it how ever you want it employers,be nice and hire us back and pay taxes into the system,or go to court,we have had it as workers.We may only be housekeepers but we used to make a damn good living in this valley.We want our jobs back now.Dont say you are interested in hiring us,we drive in for apps.,interviews(cost money we dont have) and you are putting on a fake show that you want to hire.All along you have the visa workers lined up.Fakers!People need to boycott these business also,Your money is not spent locally.

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Brian Kotowski 2 years, 10 months ago

Scott W -

Re: your remark about Asians accepting our racial stereotypes - half my dna is Japanese. I and everyone I know who have visited Japan have returned, without exception, with the same unsettling conclusion: the Japanese are the most racist people on earth. Having spoken with people who have traveled & worked all over Asia, the consensus seems to be that the same is true, to varying degrees, all over the region. But the Japs are "champs", in this regard.

I have a Caucasian friend who spent about a decade there, and is as fluent as any native. One of his favorite war stories relates to his visit to a bakery. He dismounted his motorcycle, entered the shop & ordered without taking off his helmet, which concealed his face. As soon as he removed the helmet an revealed his Caucasian features, all conversation in the shop abruptly stopped - he said it was as if someone had flipped a switch

I think Americans often don't appreciate how fortunate we are not to be ethnically homogenous, as many Asian nations are. Our diversity has generated no little friction, acrimony, and bloodshed, but we're much better for it in the here and now.

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rhys jones 2 years, 10 months ago

Sep -- Nice. I am in total agreement. Mostly.

When I strolled through the Tokyo airport, on my way to Iwakuni, I was amazed at this sea of humanity, all seemingly cast from the same mold, variations on a theme, any differences minor, more marked by similarity. Not many months later, each was as unique as you or me.

My military job was a skate, 2-3 hours of computers at the time of my choice, leaving lots of time for my day job with Bose. My employment, along with my travels, brought me in contact with many Japanese, and I observed little of the racism cited above. Indeed, most seemed to adore Americans, and aspired to succeed here.

I was especially impressed with the serenity and placidity of the Japanese; to raise their voice or disagree in public was simply beneath them. Maybe they seethed, below the surface, this amateur knows not, but they sure were peaceful in appearance.

Their industry also caught my eye. Go into any government office here, and it's like you are an intrusion into their day, God what now -- they are gathered in clusters by the water cooler, talking about the game, or painting their fingernails, maybe one or two helping the public. Slowly. Reluctantly.

Go into a Japanese office, government or otherwise, and it's like they are in a race, to see who can get the most done. Their work ethic is staggering.

So imagine my surprise, late in my visit, the base was hosting an open house, Japanese everywhere, and one about my age strolled up and inquired, in perfect American (not English) "Hey, could you get me some chocolate?" Sure, I said, right before my double-take. An LA native, he was the exact reverse of the situation above.

It takes all kinds, to fill the freeways.

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rhys jones 2 years, 10 months ago

Sep II -- As I reread your last, and recall in specific, yes, they did hush up, like say in an elevator, around us round-eyes, which I attributed to respect or modesty, as much as arrogance, possibly errantly.

It is our diversity, which is our strength. There's only one America.

Mixed breeds make the best pets, too. Some day we'll all be the same color. 'Til then, cherish the rainbow!!

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Scott Wedel 2 years, 10 months ago

Well, I find that Routt County government workers do a good job and their finance director seems to have the best sense of anyone at predicting local sales tax revenues. So I see no need for a blanket indictment of government workers.

And then there are others such as the Town Clerk of Oak Creek that openly mocks me as I am talking to Mayor Nikki. And my current farce with the Town is that it has taken 10 weeks between myself submitting a request to change two street addresses and for the person assigned by the Town to handle address changes to say that the submission was improper and they need two separate applications printed out and submitted to him. Town seems to have a policy to prove it can be even more inept that I previously imagined.

(They are corner properties with the street address being the side that has no parking or access while the other street has building access and parking).

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rhys jones 2 years, 10 months ago

I've seen rooms full of white people shut up when a black walked in, lots of times. They might have been talking about the stock market or the rain, but they shut up anyway, and what is the newcomer supposed to think they were saying?

I'll never forget the time I entered the barracks common room, on the way to mine, to find myself gazing into 15 black faces glaring at me. It was not hard to guess what their conversation might have been about. But as I glanced from one to the next, I was friends with each, on another level, somewhere else, many had passed the pipe with me.

We were all confused, so I said "Hey!! I paid for my ticket too!!" which they all found hilarious, easing the tension and allowing my passage.

Prejudice is a funny thing, and MLK was right, it's the color of a man's character that counts.

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rhys jones 2 years, 10 months ago

Again I spoke in haste and general; I too have been more than satisfied with the service I receive at our local agencies, except when they used to make me wait so long to check into jail.

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rhys jones 2 years, 10 months ago

Oh BTW -- Did Sheriff Wiggins revert to the convention, black-and-white, or did Gary Wall set a new standard, color? We're talking about the photo lineup of Routt County Sheriffs, upon which I hope to never gaze again.

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John St Pierre 2 years, 10 months ago

I want to express that I have no ill will towards Latino's or Blacks.... but against the illegal worker.... give me a level playing field and if I can't compete so be it.. but the field has to be equal....

You hear Hire local, spend local..... Then look at the Hilltop in Steamboat.... doing a major interior rehab.. no permits and bringing in 10-12 individuals with texas & florida license plates, getting paid cash and you can guess their heritage... enforce the laws!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Brian Kotowski 2 years, 10 months ago

highwaystar:

Forgive me for cherry-picking a single particle from a series of thoughtful posts, but I was struck by: "I've seen rooms full of white people shut up when a black walked in, lots of times."

Interesting. I've never encountered that. I'm in my mid-40s, and I'm guessing -- hoping -- that it's a generational or geographical thing. I like to believe that we had grown out of most of that tripe by the time my generation emerged.

I grew up on the Pacific Rim (in Washington State) amongst lots of slanted eyes; and in an area sufficiently urban where blacks were ubiquitous enough so as to not raise too many eyebrows. Other eyebrows were raised, of course, and I've been called every name in the book, from g00k to slope to nip to slant-eyed mutherf&*er... and I'm only half the bargain who can pass for white, so I can only imagine the abuse an African American had to put up with.

Still, I don't recall the blacks I grew up with (maybe 10% of my social circle at the time) complaining about it - just as I never complained about the epithets directed at me. I think I always had an instinctual understanding that those who indulged in that kind of mindless vitriol were to be avoided in the same fashion that one would steer clear of a skunk with its a$$ pointed your way - or as you put it: "to raise their voice or disagree in public was simply beneath them." That uniquely Japanese perspective was focused through an American lens, and enabled be to regard bigotry as beneath contempt. "Shoganai", as my grandmother used to say.

At the same time, my admittedly limited circle of black friends seem to share, in their own way, a similar perspective, so maybe it's more of a human conviction than anything else.

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rhys jones 2 years, 9 months ago

Sep -- Thank you for the feedback. Maybe it's both a generational and geographical thing; I'm in my mid-50's -- almost exactly Steve Jobs' age, scary huh -- and much of my upbringing was in the midwest -- South Dakota to Kansas -- where blacks were a rarity, in general. That unfortunate comment I made as a tad was in Sioux Falls, and that might have been the first black person I ever spoke directly to. I should have been shot, not just whipped.

Our Oklahoma visits to Dad's parents only reinforced any bigotry -- blacks were generally referred to as "darkies" and not with animosity, just for reference; the N word was reserved for the former purpose. They were relegated to the balcony at the theatre, as the floor was reserved for whites. I was curious now, based on that earlier event, and made a black friend when down there, a kid about my age, and we went to the movies (five cents) -- I went to the balcony with his friends -- roller skating, fishing, whatever else kids do. My biases were melting quickly, and the military completed the job, I hope, where I also made a lot of black friends. The parents and grandparents considered my new friend an oddity, maybe, but did nothing to discourage it.

So I have been overcoming prejudice my whole life, or so I tell myself, although I am sure some remains. From "our high school is better than yours" to "our country is better than yours" to "the third battalion is better than the second battalion" I think it is natural, even healthy, to think your group is better than another group. It forms identity and cohesion, if nothing else. It's nice to have someone you can point your finger at and grumble about with your friends, and lately I find myself biased against white guys wearing blue shirts and black leather accoutrements. Real bullets are an extra strike.

I've been having fun in here, my tongue in cheek at least half the time, a form of that dry humor unique to the Western Slope. I try to keep 'em chuckling, while looking at themselves, which I should probably do myself, more often.

All that said, in the instant case I believe the East Indian owners WERE guilty of discrimination; they ARE here to rape our economy, hiring illegals to circumvent taxes, and they should be appropriately burned at every level possible.

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rhys jones 2 years, 9 months ago

Oh BTW -- In case you haven't heard, Steve Jobs died today, of natural causes. He was born the same year I was. And was on my list of heroes, starting Apple, using Unix, snubbing Microsoft.

Ain't no justice. The winner checks out early, while the wanna-be scrambles, no end in sight.

Rest in peace, Steve!!

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