Millie Flanigan: Steamboat should ban dispensaries

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If you go

What: Steamboat Springs City Council meeting

When: 5 p.m. today; discussion of whether to ban medical marijuana centers in Steamboat could start at about 6:30 p.m.; a second reading of the city’s regulatory ordinance is schedule for later tonight

Where: Centennial Hall, 124 10th St.

Contact: Call city offices at 970-879-2060 or visit www.steamboatsprings.net for more information

— The ease of access to a medicinal marijuana prescription, coupled with the bakery/candy store presentation of dispensaries and their extensive advertising, blurs any clear picture as to whether this drug is truly medicinal or simply recreational. It is this mixed message that I think is most dangerous to our youth.

The dispensary model and what it has evolved into exposes the youth of our community, including the very young, to the thought that medicinal marijuana is neither harmful nor addictive and is no big deal. With the considerable increase of license holders, there is simply more marijuana in our community. With increased saturation of the drug comes increased availability to individuals of all ages, with or without a license.

The current dispensary model is not what was envisioned or intended by the voters of Colorado when Amendment 20 was passed in 2000. Amendment 20 made legal the use of a limited amount of marijuana for an individual suffering from a “debilitating medical condition.” The prescription was to be written by a physician with whom the patient had a “bona fide physician-patient relationship.” It is certainly debatable whether the majority of license holders have a “debilitating medical condition” and, as a medical provider, I do not think that receiving a license from a MD that has come to town for one day counts as a “bona fide physician-patient relationship.”

Statistics with the state registry make it clear that with the opening of dispensaries in 2009 came a staggering increase in the number of medical marijuana licenses that were written. Much of this was driven by the relationship that dispensaries had with physicians who were willing to come to town for a day to see patients with the sole purpose of writing medical marijuana licenses. It is difficult to deny that with the opening of dispensaries, the face of this issue changed dramatically. It should be noted that nowhere in the amendment was there any mention of dispensaries.

The question is not whether marijuana is better or worse than alcohol or prescription drugs, or even if it should be legalized — that is an entirely different debate. The problem is that marijuana is being billed as “medicinal” but is playing by an entirely different set of rules than other prescription drugs. Although other prescription drugs may be over-prescribed and are certainly an issue in our community, access to these drugs is entirely different than what is taking place with marijuana. If marijuana truly is to be “medicinal,” it should be playing by the same rules as other medicinal drugs.

Steamboat bills itself as a world-class resort, Ski Town USA. Are full-page color ads plastered all over our daily papers advertising the likes of Cheeba Chews, Kandy Kush and Fridays as Free Keef Cola Day best representing our community?

Some argue that it is up to parents to raise their children in such a way that they will make good choices. I aim for this in my parenting each and every day, though I am not so naive as to think that my children would not benefit from barriers to potentially risky behaviors.

Arguments against a ban of dispensaries raise the concern that license holders will start growing marijuana in their residences, unregulated. It is possible that some individuals may grow the allotted six plants in their own homes, or may even become caregivers, thereby being allowed to supply marijuana for as many as five patients.

However, this takes some level of commitment and investment, which many individuals who are happy to stop by the dispensary will choose to forgo.

I also think that without dispensaries, we will not have doctors coming to town on a regular basis to write mass prescriptions. Based on this, I would anticipate the number of license holders will dwindle throughout time and that eventually we will get closer to how things were from 2000 to 2009.

It has been argued that owners of these dispensaries have invested in our community and employ a significant numbers of employees. The owners of these dispensaries speculated on what most would consider a risky business proposition. It is not the responsibility of our community to assure their success at the expense of what is best for our community as a whole, and our youth in particular.

The most compelling argument supporting the dispensaries is that some individuals have truly benefited from them. I think this is true for a limited number of individuals. These individuals will continue to be served by Amendment 20, as it was intended, without the negative impact of the dispensaries.

I do not think any of us, including the Steamboat Springs City Council, could have foreseen the evolution of this industry and the impact of the “dispensary model.” More than 60 communities in Colorado have moved forward and have banned dispensaries. Steamboat needs to do the same. I think we as a community must re-evaluate what we want for our town and our children.

The City Council will address this issue at their next meeting. I encourage you to contact your council persons, citycouncil@steamboatsprings.net, and if possible attend the meeting tonight.

Millie Flanigan is a physician assistant in Steamboat Springs.

Comments

Scott Wedel 2 years, 11 months ago

So you are willing to defend every prescription of Prozac and Ritalin? You don't think patients seek out the doctor that will give them the prescriptions that they desire? You think the studies are wrong that show that doctors so heavily over-prescribe anti-viral and anti-bacterial drugs that it is worsening the problem of drug resistant strains?

You doubt that there are patients with pain management issues that can cope with fewer narcotics if they use some mmj? Or do you hold mmj to a standard that any abuse means get rid of it all together? And why is abuse of other prescription drugs tolerable, but not mmj?

Or you may have the mental capacity to see that mmj could also be viewed as less about mmj as an effective medicine, but more about creating a framework of rules and regulations to allow mj while trying to keep it out of the hands of kids (or at least keeping it as a criminal offense) and so on. It appears to me that children old enough to understand the Santa situation are also capable of understanding that.

Nor is it rational to say it is not about alcohol or tobacco because the marijuana debate is irrevocably about failed prohibition and what to do next. At what point does a drug that is widely recognized as being less harmful than legal products alcohol and tobacco become legal? United States has been holding steady with about 10% of population having used in the past year and steadily increasing to now 44% report having used in their lifetime.

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beentheredonethat 2 years, 11 months ago

scott, before posting shouldn't you first read the article you are making reference too? spend a little more time absorbing information and maybe a little less time spewing your opinion. thank you.

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1999 2 years, 11 months ago

To many of the concerned parents in our community, our youths’ access to and use of cannabis is of great enough concern as to trump the needs of the adult MMJ patients in Steamboat. To this, I write that I agree, yet dissent. There was no place for the recreational use of marijuana in my life as a minor, and I do not expect our teens to follow a different path. We can look at some statistics provided by the most recent “Healthy Kids Colorado” survey and see that our MMCs have had zero negative impact on the access to and use of cannabis by minors. The study, focused on teens and tweens, reports marijuana usage rates in the past month and lifetime, as well as the ease of access to the drug in 2008 (pre-MMC) and then 2010 (post-MMC). The results show that the numbers are generally flat or down across the board. Reference here (note: seventh- and eighth-graders were not likely polled in the 2008 survey).

Combine these statistics with other related studies such as a U.S.-Netherlands (Amsterdam, anyone?) comparison (http://www.drugwarfacts.org/cms/node/67), wherein it’s shown that marijuana usage recently and throughout a lifetime for the Dutch is half that of Americans’, and we may deduce that it is education, not prohibition, that works. In fact, we have suggested to the Steamboat Springs City Council that half of all sales tax receipts from Steamboat’s MMCs be directed to youth substance abuse diversion programs. Let’s put these dollars to work keeping our kids on the right path

stolen from keven fisher

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hereandthere 2 years, 11 months ago

Scott wrote a pretty clear and concise response to this article. Even referencing several posts that Millie brought up in her letter. Maybe it's beentheredonethat who needs to spend a little more time absorbing information, before he starts spewing opinion. Scott brought up something that Millie, Harrington, and the other pill pushers conveniently neglect to bring to the conversation. And that is the overwelming abuse of their pills that they are only to willing to prescribe. Doctors coming to town to write precriptions? Wouldn't be an issue if Doctors in town were willing to prescribe mmj as a viable alternative to the dangerous narcotics that they make available to our comminity, and our kids.

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SMRFF 2 years, 11 months ago

Do any of you anti-mmj/anti-legalization people not understand the concept of using FACTS to support an argument? Using phrases such as "I think", "It can be argued", "I know people", etc, does not prove anything. I think the reason none of you use FACTS is because you don't have any! You just spew the same antiquated crap information that people such as Dr. Harrington and Capt. Rae have been pushing since the Reefer Madness days.

Millie, I keep re-reading your article to try and find the empirical evidence to support each one of the many off-base points you make, yet all you are doing is making claims based off of what you've "heard" or what you perceive to be true. Unforunately, Millie, your perception of MMJ does not equal reality.

I'm sure most of you naysayers will avoid reading Kevin's op-ed piece because it does not align with your opinions. However, he uses FACTUAL, objective evidence to support each one of his claims.

Sadly, I don't think any amount of factual evidence will ever sway people with their heads buried so ridiculously far in the sand.

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Fred Duckels 2 years, 11 months ago

life expectancy has increased by more than 20 years in my lifetime, wonder how much marijuana had to do with that?

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kevin fisher 2 years, 11 months ago

Fred- Pot had nothing to do with life expectancy increases. Nor is that even a remotely cogent argument.

A couple of points need to be made in response yo Millie's piece:

Let's start here,

"The current dispensary model is not what was envisioned or intended by the voters of Colorado when Amendment 20 was passed in 2000."

...is a pile of rubbish. Why don't we read a couple of quotes from the DRAFTER of amendmet 20, Mark Chilcutt?

"Chilcutt, now 76, said the intention of Amendment 20 was to create a constitutional amendment that, when approved, couldn’t be changed. He said it also was written, with the help of his attorneys, in a way that was flexible enough to allow the medical marijuana industry to evolve into a workable system that would benefit patients."

and

"But Chilcutt said a corner drugstore type of distribution model was part of the evolution he envisioned for Amendment 20. He just didn’t know to what extent."

and

“My very first impression was, ‘Great. It’s working. Dispensaries are opening, and there’s a delivery system in process.’ I thought, ‘This is great. It’s wonderful.’”

His intent seems pretty clear to me.

Now as for docs coming to town to write MMJ scrips- two points. One, there is a local physician or two who write the recommendations and believe me, I've spoken with a number of others who would as well if not for the systemic intimidation of this small-town medical establishment, led by Dr. Harrington and his cronies. Secondly, last I checked physicians don't take rebuke or treatment advice from P.A's too well. You see "assistant" is even part of the job title.

FACTS, we don't need no stinkin' FACTS.

Kevin Fisher

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seeuski 2 years, 11 months ago

I would be willing to bet that there is not a Doctor who would NOT prescribe cannabis if it were proven effective in a particular treatment. That insinuates that Doctors would withhold a known treatment for a fear of retribution or a political position, hogwash!! So who is stretching the facts now Kevin? Maybe provide those Docs names because I fear that my Doc may be one you are suggesting here and I am concerned that in the future my Doc may withhold a curative drug for the reasons you suggest. Serious charges, back em up.

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Bill Dalzell 2 years, 11 months ago

Millie, while I cannot say I disagree with some of your concerns you remind me a lot of an out of touch politician. You look to solve the worlds problem with a very uneducated knee jerk reaction. It is very similar to say the housing crisis. Lets create a bunch of ill perceived rules and regulations that will further muddle up the real problems. You can sit back and feel like you did your part while you really created a much bigger problem.

I believe Kevin spoke of this in his editorial, but I find irony in your reference to "Cheeba Chews, Kandy Kush and Fridays as Free Keef Cola Day". First off how do you know all these names? For two reasons. One because they are heavily advertised by a dispensary that is not in city limits, to which, you wish to give the upper hand. Secondly, because The Pilot allows full page adds. This is the real problem. One which people like you and Joel Rae don't seem to want to address. Why not put public pressure, or create regulations on advertising within the Pilot? If the articles and adds didn't exist you and your kids would barely even know dispensaries existed.

"this takes some level of commitment and investment, which many individuals who are happy to stop by the dispensary will choose to forgo." Millie, Millie, Millie... Do you really believe that limiting dispensaries will limit the number of people who smoke? This line in of itself makes me realize that you truly don't understand the nature of the problem.

In short Millie, many of your concerns are warranted. I strongly feel that MMJ use amongst teens is damaging and should not be tolerated. If you are concerned, though, banning dispensaries in Steamboat Springs is not the answer. It will enable reckless dispensaries that are not willing to follow the rules to flourish. I assure you that it will also create a black market. Furthermore, if people are concerned with a childs perception, why won't anyone approach the paper about allowing their ridiculous ads (Ads by dispensaries outside of city limits by the way) and their continous stream of headlines and pictures of pot plants. If children are the concern, why not also allocate all of the tax received to education and prevention of recreational use.

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Scott Wedel 2 years, 11 months ago

Fred, "life expectancy has increased by more than 20 years in my lifetime, wonder how much marijuana had to do with that?"

The answer is just about nothing. From the large health studies which then researchers sift through the data, it is pretty clear that mmj usage has no significant impact upon life expectancy. It does not appear to either shorten or lengthen people's lives on average. Meanwhile, tobacco and heavy alcohol use do shorten lives.

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jerry carlton 2 years, 11 months ago

Put it to a vote but it needs to be a county wide vote or all the operations will go to Oak Creek, Milner, or unincorporated areas of the county.

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seeuski 2 years, 11 months ago

Pot does not effect the lungs like tobacco does? Hmmmm, I don't feel comfortable with that statement as any inhaled particulates are toxic, why did I used to cough so much when I toked? Oh no, there are medical studies on this topic. "Marijuana Smokers Face Rapid Lung Destruction -- As Much As 20 Years Ahead Of Tobacco Smokers" http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080123104017.htm

You have a right to smoke just stop blowing that smoke up our a$$s.

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Scott Wedel 2 years, 11 months ago

Seesuki, Big trouble with that study is that long term health studies do not find the mj smokers either suffering from that sort of lung destruction or having died from it. And certainly smoking pot has been popular enough for long enough that horrible health effects would have shown up in all sorts of health data by now.

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seeuski 2 years, 11 months ago

Oh OK, now I see, I'll dismiss all scientific medical studies and just check in with you from time to time. Thanks Scott, now pass the peace pipe.

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Ryan Fisher 2 years, 11 months ago

Hey Seeuski, Taken from the same page that you referenced:

Note the headline -

"Study Finds No Link Between Marijuana Use And Lung Cancer" http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/05/060526083353.htm

By the way, in response to your first post, many popular medical treatments are debated in the scientific community every day. Not all doctors believe in the same course of treatments. To paraphrase from Kevin, "Ever heard of a second opinion? Apply here."

Ryan FIsher co-owner Rocky Mountain Remedies

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SMRFF 2 years, 11 months ago

See - "I'll dismiss all scientific medical studies and just check in with you from time to time."

It seems as though you are attempting to be sarcastic. However, you and your overzealous, anti-marijuana campaigners happily disregard the dozens, hundreds, thousands, of "scientific medical studies" supporting the uses, benefits and low-risks of marijuana on a daily basis.

You clearly have issues with cherry-picking your information to support your less-than-valid arguments.

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Bill Dalzell 2 years, 11 months ago

See you got to admit that that study is kind of odd in that it was a "Study" of ten patients that already had lung issues and were already patients. Its kind of like a study of ten emergency room patients at YVMC in February that states that 8 out of 10 skiiers will experience fractures if they participate in the sport of skiing.

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seeuski 2 years, 11 months ago

You guys are great. There is no argument that you people can't twist to fit your end goal that pot is the cure for everything and has no side effects or dangers. The study above had nothing to do with lung cancer just some lung damage, here are several studies by different scientists. This is just to show that smoking pot is not without some health risks, I don't like tobacco either so I don't smoke either. I don't care what others do as long as I don't suffer the consequences of their activities or am subjected to falsities that promote such activities. Like cannabis cures cancer. http://www.sciencedaily.com/search/?type=news&keyword=marijuana+and+cancer&section=all&filename=&period=1825&sort=relevance#

3pin, I was not responding to the comment from Kevin that you are referencing, talk about cherry picking! He made a claim that he knows of Doctors that would prescribe pot as a treatment but are afraid of peer pressure, and I feel that is libelous.

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JJ Southard 2 years, 11 months ago

Smoking cannabis has not shown to have an true effect on cancerous growth. Although, ingesting hemp oils indeed has shown promise. Is it the hands down cure for cancer in all it's form?? Meaning, if diagnosed, just smoke some cannabis and it goes away...? No. But, when concentrated in a proper way, the concentrates, when ingested orally, will saturate the body (YES, this is intoxicating...and when people are under this sort of treatment regimen, they don't do much...they sleep alot...similar to chemotherapy)...but when the body is fully saturated with cannabinoids, it has been proven scientifically, since the 1970's that the growth of the tumors are inhibited. The spread of the cancer cells halts and does not spread to other cells and into neighboring lymph-nodes...which we all know is the end result of cancer suffers sometimes. Cannabis will not stop some cancers, especially ones at the far end stages. These patients are usually on heavy chemical meds and the appetites are fully suppressed and the are now in "wasting" stage. Cannabis creates a "quality of life" for those wasting away on the chemical meds.

Many other conditions have similar miraculous aid from cannabis.

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Fred Duckels 2 years, 11 months ago

My arguement is that the marijuana buffs point at conventional medicine as a joke, it is certainly a contributor to life expectancy as compared to their coveted weed.

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JJ Southard 2 years, 11 months ago

Fred....how many times are you going to come on here and spew garbage?

Of course conventional medicine contributes to life expectancy, did you pull you head outta the sand long enough to come up with that all on your own?

Cannabis, when used properly, has the ability to add years to sick people lives. I know of many "medicines" that have been purported under the guise "conventional" medicine and have dropped people (mostly old folks) dead all over the world. Where does dropping dead from a medicine a doctor prescribes fit into "life expectancy"

Please, Fred.....enlighten us further.....

Sick of your crap, Fred. Climb back in your death trap trucks and go home.

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bandmama 2 years, 11 months ago

My, where to start? Lets start with this, I have a chronic incurable disorder. One of the FEW prescription drugs used to treat my disorder is thalidomide, which is a LEGAL prescribed drug. Let me inform you of just a FEW of the known side effects. Arthritis, hypertonia, myalgia, twitching of the limbs, uncontrolled shaking, electrolyte imbalances, kidney function abnormalities, pretty much everything on a routine chemistry profile..abnormalities that is, hypertention, CHF, Afibs, Raynauds syndrome, EKG abnormnalities, PVD, enlarged liver/hepatic failure, emphysema, pulmonary embolis, edema of the lungs.....plueral effusion, certain types of luekemia, Hodgkins disease, diabetes, hypothyroidism, abnormal hormone levels resulting from adrenal dysfuntion, deafness, eye pain, depression, euphoria, phychosis, suicidal thoughts and last but certainly NOT all or least..Phocomlia, commonly known as FLIPPER BABIES. The best part? Most of these SIDE effects are also signs and symptoms of my disease. I made a very well informed decision NOT to use a LEGAL prescribed drug for my course of treatment. The use of my "drug" of choice is used to treat my symptoms, I am fully aware that there is no cure for what I have. But I do have the choice to take a drug that alleviates or eliminates my symptoms. Legally at this point in time. Go ahead! Strive to make me a criminal for not wanting to live with pain and not wanting flipper babies, for me OR my son's children someday. I can live with being called a criminal for that. So will MANY others. And if anyone is under the pretense that major drug companies do not BUY a physicians choice to prescribe the drug they are pushing? Look at the pen, coffee mug calender and many other little "gifts" laying around your dr's office the next time you have a check up. If the dr is in because he is out playing golf with a "Drug Rep". Mr Fisher and Mr Fisher, maybe there would be more local dr's supporting you if you were to take them to play golf. Or buy a couple of tickets for Strings, or maybe a ski pass? I would be happy to put a few pens on my desk with your logo on them. Same concept, huh?

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seeuski 2 years, 11 months ago

Oh no, so it is golf and free pens and paper pads and calenders that is motivating Doctors who spent years in school and hundreds of thousands of dollars to become someone that helps people live in good health. I am learning so much here today. The next time you visit your Doctor, how about accusing them in person of their sins that you are claiming here, see how they respond to that one. This whole discussion really shows how crazy this issue makes people.

OUT!!!

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TWill 2 years, 11 months ago

The "greasing" tactics used by pharmaceutical sales reps to influence doctors go well beyond free pens and coffee mugs. That's just what you can see. Ask any drug rep (that's not a shamed to tell the truth) and you'll find out just how dirty it really is.

Pharmaceutical sales is an extremely aggressive business because there is so much money to be made by the companies and individual sales reps respectively. It's one of the more lucrative professions/ industries in our overall economy. I'm not a conspiracy theorist, but if you don't think the pharmaceutical companies have a significant influence on this (or any health care related) topic, you're completely naive or just not paying attention.

That being said, Millie's argument was very well articulated and brings up some very legitimate points.

Maybe we can regulate the MMJ industry a little more effectively before shutting it down entirely? Or, better yet, the owners of the local dispensaries could follow the lead of the Fishers and RMR by conducting their business and advertising with a certain level of professionalism and discretion. One obnoxious Hawaiian themed establishment seems to come to mind here… Doesn’t it strike anyone odd that another venture of this brightly colored “entrepreneur” is tree removal? Nothing goes better together than chainsaws, falling trees and some award winning dope. What could go wrong?? Clean up your act, “dudes”. You’ll have a lot more creditability if you do.

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bandmama 2 years, 11 months ago

see-no it isn't the pens with some dr's, but greed. And yes it does happen. 11 years in the medical field, saw it happen. Sins? no, but I do suggest that maybe you ask your own trusted family dr about other dr's who get kick backs based on the number of scripts filled for some major drug companies. I am not saying that all physicians do but there are enough. The major point you seem to have missed is that as an educated adult, I made a choice that was best for me, and my course of care, with much less severe side effects on my body that is already a bit in limbo. If I could chew wild wintergreen berries with the same results I would, rather than experienceing any of the "side" effects of the drug that offered by my health care professional. I made a choice to instead treat my symptoms (note I did NOT say cure, but TREAT) with an alternative medication that has worked for me. By taking away my choice, instead of being a mmj user, I would be classified as a criminal. Do you understand the point I am trying to make? We are not talking about meth, or crack or coke or anything along those lines, (all man made btw) but a plant that provides relief to me. Do you know anyone who takes Digoxin? Derived from Foxglove. Just because it doesn't cost millions of dollars to produce it doesn't mean the positive results from a seeminly ordinary plant are invalid. I agree 100% that when used as medicine there whould be guidelines and regulations. RMR has followed these to a T. The one down the road near Milner? Nope. Very irresponsible advertising and I wouldn't give them my business because of that.

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seeuski 2 years, 11 months ago

I am aware of the pharmaceutical sales industry and that Doc's get kickbacks for some scripps, I have heard that and believe it, I have just never had a Doc in all my years push scripps on me. The way I post on here I am sure y'all know I am as big a skeptic as anybody on everything, I always question my Doc when I am prescribed a drug and I have stubbornly refused stuff like antibiotics and won't take em less I'm near death. bandmama I am glad you have the choice to use MMJ instead of the scripps you described, I would too, and I think we are now back to a more rational discussion on this subject. I just thought that it was over the top to paint the Doctors the way you did earlier. I hope you can see where my line is in these posts and it is NOT with your type of usage, it's the piggybacking of the MMJ industry with the get high people, two different topics. If it were the case then I should go get some valium and get high, or Oxycotin, or quaaludes, whats the difference with those sources of a buzz and pot? And I don't need the man made and nature argument, nature doesn't roll joints and lite bongs. So I am not against the MMJ thing, I just see the difference between that and recreational use. Heck, I used to do it and have only posted my experiences on these forums, like hyperventilating which I was told by my foes that pot doesn't cause. BS, I experienced it. Good evening.

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bandmama 2 years, 11 months ago

see- thank you for making an effort to see someone elses point of view! Really! You obvoiusly think, and have been very fortunate to be able to question a dr's recomendation. So many others dont, and are led into a world of side effects that are so much more harmful than the disorder they went to to a dr for. I was very blessed to be working in the field, otherwise I would have trusted many dr's who I thought had my best interests at heart. That is why education & open honest truths are of the upmost importance in this debate. I in no way mean to paint all physicians in a bad light but my own personnal experiences have taught me to question everything, and research all that I can, anything that is "prescribed' to me. ALTHOUGH, your comment about rolling joints and loading a bong is also very misleading, please, please read about other means of ingesting cannabis. While an injected candy bar to some may just be a piece of candy, the amount of THC in the bar itself has been monitored to a special degree of needed use. Hemp seeds. A major source of omega 3's and has been a huge help for me. And no THC involved. This plant has uses that far surpass anything I has even been "prescribed" by traditional doctors. Again, let me also point out that I am adamantly against so many other street drugs. I dare anyone to suggest to me that meth, crank, or other substances should be made legal and tell me one just one medical good they do. They dont. Cannabis has many qualities, and the unfair "labeling" it gets does nothing for those of use that use it, legitimately for medical reasons. Do I think that at times some get it on the side? YES. But it is just as easy for me to get valium, oxycotin and other misused drugs as it is to get mmj. I do not want to be labled a criminal, but I do appreciate my quality of life. I work hard and deserve the chance to use a drug that allows me to do so. Contact me, i would love to sit down privately and discuss this with you, or anyone. Again, thanks for opening a door to a discussion, instead of a debate. It means so much to so many.

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seeuski 2 years, 11 months ago

Thank you for a good discussion bandmama. It's true, I have been into holistic means of treatment for years and am very interested in the efficacy of MMJ but am turned off by the hangers on who just want to get high. Good night.

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freerider 2 years, 11 months ago

see-

maybe there is hope for you yet

so what's wrong with getting high ....this is a free country it's a choice ..the American way

are you anti-American ??

maybe you and Fred and all the other brown shirts outta try some fascist police state for awhile ...oh yeah I forgot that's what we have when it comes to MMJ right now

A racist piece of crap law written by a white racist to protect corporate profits

Man makes alcohol and pills - God makes Marijuana - who you gonna trust fool

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TWill 2 years, 11 months ago

You just took it down a notch there, freerider.

The expression, "you get a lot more flies with honey than a piece of ..." applies to this situation. You and the rest of the chronic chronies should give it a try and see how much further you'll get. Your message would be taken more seriously by "the man" if your presentation was better.

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Scott Glynn 2 years, 11 months ago

Great debate everyone. I have a question though. Many people who are pro MMJ fly the flag that it is not as dangerous as alcohol/prescription drugs when it comes to daily functions. That being said, I found this statement found in the 4/20 pilot to be curious.

Ward said he recommends Big Island Banana as a sleep aid and for relaxation.

“It is a mellow high, sort of a couch potato, evening smoke,” he said. “You wouldn’t want to smoke it during the day if you want to function.”

Now if I were a proponent of legalized marijuana I am pretty sure I would not have let the paper quote me on that.

I feel that there is a certain lack of legitimacy surrounding the entire industry. As a financial conservative, I applaud anyone who has the nerve to capture the entrepreneurial spirit, and take those financial chances as an owner operator of any type of business. However those businesses must operate within the boundaries of the law. I am not naive enough to believe that every other type of business has no rule breakers but I digress. If our lawmakers have decided that we need to allow MMJ dispensaries then fine. But to Dr. Flannigan's point they need to legitimize the process with which an MMJ patient receives a prescription card.

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TWill 2 years, 11 months ago

You're right, Scott. Look at the source of that quote though.

If you were a legitimate proponent of MMJ, you wouldn't do most of the things that clown has. Check out his rap sheet over the years in this town. The guy has been a consistent source of controversy around here for a long time.

I'm no PR expert, but this guy is probably not the best promoter to use if the overall MMJ message is to be taken seriously.

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jimmmmmm 2 years, 11 months ago

I think BillyD said it best, the real concern is the advertising. If the industry would remain discrete, we wouldn't even know they exist.

I've said it before-there are much bigger problems that should maintain our focus. Meth being #1 in my opinion.

I would hate to see pot go back to the black market, which it will in full force. Seems like a good idea to collect taxes off the dispensaries, regulate the growers, etc. Pot will always be around, and always has been-why give it back to the black market?

I honestly think the biggest critics are just upset b/c they think they're being duped. Well, you are in many cases. Big deal-get over it. There are much worse drugs in this area that should receive all the attention.

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Scott Wedel 2 years, 11 months ago

I think “It is a mellow high, sort of a couch potato, evening smoke," was an extremely stupid think to say.

With mmj being legal because of Amendment 20 which listed medical conditions then a dispensary should be limited to promoting legal uses of mmj. I think the County should consider whether Chris Ward is promoting illegal use of mmj and whether his business permit should be reviewed.

A pharmacy that talked about some prescription drug having a mellow high would be rightly roundly criticized.

Talk like that is not just annoying, but it also appears to be promoting illegal usage of a drug which is regulated by the State of Colorado.

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bandmama 2 years, 11 months ago

scottglynn- I think if you read through the posts again, most of us who support mmj have repeatedly said we feel that Mr.Ward and his advertising is not quite what this critical debate needs. I agree with that maybe his business permit should be reviewed. OR....maybe local publications could use some discretion when printing some advertising, as should some of the local radio stations. And, no most scripts dont carry the warning of, mellow couch potato kind of high. Most would carry a warning saying something to the effect of "medication may impair your ability to drive or operate machinery, use care until you become familiar to the effects"

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