Teen arrested after crashing car Wednesday night

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— An 18-year-old Steamboat Springs man faces misdemeanor charges after police say he crashed his car while driving drunk Wednesday night in the 1700 block of Meadow Lane and then spit in a firefighter’s face.

Steamboat Springs Police Department officers were called to a report of a car that had crashed into a ditch at about 11 p.m. Connor Lee Brown, 18, was found trapped inside and was taken to Yampa Valley Medical Center with minor injuries.

While being taken to the hospital, Steamboat Springs Fire Rescue emergency responders told police that Brown was combative and spit in a firefighter’s face, according to an affidavit filed in Routt County Court.

After being treated at YVMC, Brown was taken to Routt County Jail and booked on suspicion of driving under the influence, minor in possession of alcohol, possession of less than 2 ounces of marijuana, failure to notify police, third-degree assault and obstructing a firefighter.

Brown appeared in court Thursday and was released on a personal recognizance bond. He was represented by Steamboat attorney Drew Johnroe, who told Judge Shelley Hill that he was still gathering information about the incident.

Comments

Amy Harris 3 years, 2 months ago

beentheredonethat, i have known connor since he was a little boy, and this is out of character for him. i am not condoning what he did-we are all responsible for our decisions and have to suffer the consequences of our actions. however, i CAN understand that he is suffering enormously after watching his beloved mother lose a lengthy battle with cancer just a couple of months ago. he is devastated and is acting out in a very sad way. my heart aches for connor and i hope this incident guides him toward help with his grief.

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kathy foos 3 years, 2 months ago

I'm sorry for the loss of his mother,and am glad he is O.K.Every life is precious and I hope he will be able to turn his life around.I am also sorry for the emercency workers who had a hard time.

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1999 3 years, 2 months ago

good luck to you connor. lots of people out here that would be happy to lend you a hand in any way.

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Zed 3 years, 2 months ago

What say the teachers that taught this young mind?

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spidermite 3 years, 2 months ago

Connor, In my opinion you have employed " a top-notch attorney". I was surprised to read that Drew had taken this case. Thanks to the comment by Amy Harris I now understand why he did. Good Luck!

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callguinness 3 years, 2 months ago

At some point we have to understand that we all go through hard times in life. We all lose people close to us and that is difficult for all of us.

However getting drunk, crashing your car, and spitting in the face of the people who come to help you has no excuse.

We have laws in place for a reason, and hopefully they are upheld in this case.

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spidermite 3 years, 2 months ago

callguinness- Grief affects people differently. I lost my father at age 17. It tore me apart. Did one of your parents pass away when you were a child?

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callguinness 3 years, 2 months ago

spidermite- Grief does affect all of us differently.

To answer your question. No I have thankfully not lost either of my parents. I just don't see that as any excuse for this type of behavior.

Did you go out drinking and then crash a car, to follow that up with spitting in the face of someone whose only goal is to try and take care of you?

I understand connor is going through hard times. I agree he should get help. However none of that makes what he has done ok.

Thankfully it sounds like connor only had minor injuries, did kill or injure anyone else, and hopefully didn't have anything contagious to spread to the firefighter.

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spidermite 3 years, 2 months ago

Unless you have experienced that great of a loss as a child, you shouldn't judge him. It's not an excuse - it's real life.

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Bill Dalzell 3 years, 2 months ago

Sounds like callguiness is an expert life coach. Probably has never done anything wrong in his entire life. Especially when he was young.. I think we should all bow down and take a moment to honor callguiness's state of perfection. Its amazing!

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callguinness 3 years, 2 months ago

As much as it would be fun to claim my life as perfection I am far from that. I have made many mistakes in my life. I got lucky with a lot of my bad decisions. I'm not even for a second suggesting that locking up young connor is the answer. I am suggesting that if we as society decided that their is no punishment at all for our actions, than I'm going to need to find a different society to live in.

Lastly this is not about judging him. This is about saying that he does still deserve some level of punishment. When I have made my mistakes in life I always had punishment to deal with and I learned to avoid that punishment by avoiding those actions.

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Phoebe Hackman 3 years, 2 months ago

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." I don't know who said that, but it is certainly true. I'm so very sorry for Connor's loss, but it would be a mistake to coddle him and not make him bear the full responsibility for his actions. He is not a child. He is an 18 year old man. If he doesn't learn better coping skills now, he's got a rough road ahead of him. Besides losing his mother, he could have lost his life or caused someone else to lose their mother ... or child, or sibling or best friend. As it is, he will only lose some of his freedom for awhile. I sincerely hope he is steered toward getting counseling. And more than that, I hope he has a loving family or other support system that will draw in around him and let him know that he is not alone.

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bandmama 3 years, 2 months ago

Phoebe- I agree with everything you say. As the mother of a recent turned "18" yr old male offspring I know, they are not yet a man and what you say is very true, how he is held accountable for his behavior, no matter the reason WILL help him become a "man". He is still a child. He and my son went to school together. And my 18 yr old is still my kiddo.

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Brian Kotowski 3 years, 2 months ago

My dad is 2nd generation, whose parents were processed at Ellis. Dad was raised below the poverty line; his own father was a drunk who was dead by the time Dad was 11; his mother was an abusive, controlling shrew. I suppose if he had misbehaved sufficiently to wind up in jail, there are those who would say "there, there, we musn't judge", in light of his background of privation, loss, and abuse. You wouldn't find my father among them.

One of the gigs Dad took to put himself through school was that of a small town cop. One of his favorite war stories from that period (which he tells approvingly) is of one of the town's young hellions. Junior was the offspring of one of the area's wealthier families, and had been in & out of trouble for years. One night, Junior boosted a car and used it to take out all the mailboxes & trashcans his drunken stupor enabled him to target, before crashing the vehicle through a storefront.

Late that night, Junior's dad arrived at the station, laid a $50 bill on the desk and invited Dad & his partner to treat themselves to a meal. He also requested that he be left with the key to Junior's cell. Dad & his partner agreed. Junior received a visit from his father, who methodically beat the snot out of him. Junior never had any problems with the law again (at least, not in my Dad's jurisdiction).

My hat's off to the firefighter - I don't know that I would have been able to duplicate his restraint.

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spidermite 3 years, 2 months ago

Sep, Your saying your father, who was a small town cop, accepted a bribe. Then he turned his back and allowed his prisoners father to "methodically beat the snot" out of his son who was intoxicated and locked in a cell. Are you proud of this?

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Brian Kotowski 3 years, 2 months ago

I'm amused by it. I'm also impressed that the experience apparently prevailed upon Junior to grow up.

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spidermite 3 years, 2 months ago

Sep, Did your father grow up in the "deep south"?

Bandmama, I agree with you. Just because a child has his eighteenth birthday he doesn't automatically become a man. Our government set this time schedule for our young men. Seems to me it used to be twenty-one.

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Brian Kotowski 3 years, 2 months ago

spidermite:

Nope. Pennsylvania. But thanks for asking.

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Phoebe Hackman 3 years, 2 months ago

bandmama: Yep, my guys are grown and gone, but they are still my babies (just don't tell them I said so, lol!)

spidermite: "Our government set this time schedule for our young men. Seems to me it used to be twenty-one." Well, not exactly. By the time you're 18, you can drive a car, own a gun, vote, sign a contract, be tried as an adult ... and die for your country in some godforsaken desert or jungle. The only thing you can't do until you're 21 is drink. So it seems the government has pretty much decided people are adults at 18. But that still doesn't make it so. Some people are adults at 16, some aren't at 40. One sign of maturity is whether you're able to learn from your mistakes ...and others' mistakes, as well. Maybe Connor's experience will help prevent some other kid from making a worse mistake.

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bandmama 3 years, 2 months ago

sep- good for the kids dad! While do realize that there is a LOT of abuse, parents are no longer allowed to disipline their children. I have heard more than once when a parent tried to correct a child to have the child mouth back "you cant spank me, I will call DFS!!!' Ok, where does that leave the parent? I am not saying that a beating a day is what is needed, and I am in NO way using the term, "training" in a negative way, but I firmly beleive that if you can "train" or "teach" a child at an early age what behavior is appropriate, it only makes it easier to guide them as they do get older. There has to be a little fear of punishment. If it be a swat or a grounding or a time out. (BTW, time outs never bothered my kid. As an only child, he enjoyed reading, entertaining himself or daydreaming and at the age of about 8 asked me once "when is time out, Mom?" Pointless punishment. spidermite- the guy may have accepted a bribe, but the community as a whole was probably better off. And yes at 21 some kids are more apt to be "adult" than at 18. At 18, they are only seen as meat to send overseas. But they cant buy each other a beer to say good bye to each other. And I do of another young man (who was 16) who thought he was cool and also spit in the face of an officer after being busted for being an idiot,who was treated accordingly, this man has been my husband for 25 years and says that if the officers hadn't responded in the way they did, he never would have feared doing the same stupid stunt again. The officers had every right to tame an idiot and he did learn from his mistake. phoebe-yes, they will ALWAYS be our little ones, even when they tower over us and shake their heads from embarassment when we ask for a good bye kiss in the morning, but thankfully even while shaking his head mine still will.

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spidermite 3 years, 2 months ago

Phoebe, I know the age is 18. A long time ago I believe it was 21.

Bandmama, What?

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bandmama 3 years, 2 months ago

spidermite- my husband was also a very distraught young lad once. If a few ADULT men hadn't stepped in a time or two to point out that he was going down a very wrong path, he wouldn't be the man he is today. It took some guidance and tough love to turn his life around. And to those peopple I am very thankful.

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spidermite 3 years, 2 months ago

Apparently Connor wasn't a "distraught young lad" until he had this life altering experience. Be kind. What's a peopple?

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Phoebe Hackman 3 years, 2 months ago

spidermite - "Be kind." Really? From you? You're one of the most antagonistic people on these forums. I'm very sorry you lost your father at an age when a young man needs a role model more than ever. He was very important to you. Would he be proud of your continual pettiness and mean-spirited remarks? "Peopple" is a typographical error. You've made numerous errors in your posts; everyone does at one time or another. We look beyond the typos, lack of punctuation and bad grammar to just communicate with one another. Bandmama responded sincerely to your "What?" by trying to clarify her comments. But you weren't being sincere, you were being sarcastic and snide, as usual. Stop it. Write like your father was reading every word.

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spidermite 3 years, 2 months ago

So bandmama. What' a peopple? Dad wants to know!

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bandmama 3 years, 2 months ago

thanks pheobe! spidermite "peopple" is a non spell checked form of the word "people". Tell dad for me. And I also feel for you as a young man who lost his father at such a young age. I do hope that you had someone in your life who helped to guide you through that difficult time.

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spidermite 3 years, 2 months ago

I had several people, as kind as Pheobe, to guide me.

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spidermite 3 years, 2 months ago

bandmama, Dad says it would be nice if you learned how to spell.

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Cooke 3 years, 2 months ago

Spidermite: In your post poking fun at Bandmama's misspelling of "people" (about four posts up from here) did you notice that you left out the apostrophe s?

Did you notice in your post two above this one that you misused your commas ("as kind as Pheobe is essential to the sentence, therefore should not be set off by commas).

Did your dad say it would be nice if you learned some 5th grade grammar?

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rhys jones 3 years, 2 months ago

My Communications prof at WSC (they did NOT call it English) also taught English at Oxford and help a PhD on the subject. She emphasized that we do NOT speak English here, but "the American language," even more robust than English.

While some punctuation rules are very precise, others are equally loose. A semicolon should always separate two independent clauses, not a comma, as that would constitute a "comma splice." Commas are used to separate dependant clauses, for readability. Therefore spider's use of commas in the quoted selection was correct.

Now we really are getting petty, using any excuse possible to peck away at the opposition. I would suggest sticking to the topic, where opinions count, and not dissecting prose, where they do not.

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MrTaiChi 3 years, 2 months ago

Mr. Natural, I enjoy every insight into your upbringing.

My father died when I was sixteen. It wasn't a slow wasting like the subject's mother, apparently. I can see how that would make a young man more bitter about the fairness of life in general than my experience having family friends show up and tell us that Dad wouldn't be coming home from a business trip because he had a heart attack. Still, I managed not to spit in anyone's face thereafter.

The age of 21 for recognition as an adult harkens back to the middle ages when, on average, that was the age when a nobleman could bear the weight of armor. We don't have initiation ceremonies like more sensible aboriginal tribes, after which people are expected to comport themselves like adults. Today there is a sliding scale of ages at which a person is considered no longer to be under disability of inexperience, depending on their legal situation.

I have observed that there is usually, 'usually', a metamorphosis in posters here in which one new to the site and feeling her oats gets snarky and combative, sarcastic and petty, later to ripen into more restrained judgment. Let us hope that all such contributors mature from semi-colons to full colons with all speed.

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bandmama 3 years, 2 months ago

LOL! My mother insisted we speak the "King's English" when I was little. Try being the only little girl in rural Missouri that said "la-BOR-A-tory" and "for-ed" instead of "LABRA-tary" and "forehead". Thanks Mom...for teaching me the difference and allowing me to get teased till 4th grade. Mr-TaiChi- a full 'colon" does work at speed and enourages one to want to purge. Something.......lol! spidermite- Funny, my 6th grade teacher said the same thing!!!!!

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Jeff_Kibler 3 years, 2 months ago

bmama, if your were born after 1952, I'm pretty sure it's referred to as the "Queen's English." Kinda goes with who's sitting on the throne, doing that purging thing. Thanks for the laugh.

"England and America are two countries separated by a common language."

After Ronald Reagan had his bowel resected, the proper salutation became

Dear Mr. President;

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spidermite 3 years, 2 months ago

bandmama, For as long as I have known you I had no idea your peopple spoke the "King's English".

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Cooke 3 years, 2 months ago

Highway -- because I do love grammar, I must protest. However, those of you who don't love grammar rules, read no further.

While your professor was correct about comma splices and clauses, Spidermite's use of commas was not a matter of separating independent clauses, and certainly had nothing to do with a comma splice (which is just a fancy name for a run-on-sentence). Rather, spider used commas to set off what she (he) thought was a "non essential interrupter" - a phrase contained within a sentence to add insight or clarity but not necessary.

ex: Ted, my father's best friend, was always helping in the garage.

In the above example, the phrase set off by commas could be left out of the sentence and the sentence would still make perfect sense. While Spider's sentence would have still been grammatically correct if she (he) had left out the Phoebe bit, it would not have made sense, therefore was an ESSENTIAL part of the sentence. Essential bits are not separated by commas, non-essential bits are.

All in good fun highway (except for Spider's bit, but that is because I though he was just being hypocritically nasty).

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exduffer 3 years, 2 months ago

Dear Pilot, I solemnly request that Cooke's post be removed for referring to ppeople's essential bits.

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rhys jones 3 years, 2 months ago

"as" is a funny word, as it can be used so many ways. While on the list of prepositions, thus tempting me to classify spider's phrase as prepositional, and thus deserving of distinction via commas, Dictionary.com might disagree, classifying it as an adverb, in this case -- I refer you to their second definition:

  1. for example; for instance: Some flowers, as the rose, require special care.

spider's sentence makes perfect sense without the phrase, justifying the commas. I would offer a compromise, and suggest that either is correct. Or neither is incorrect.

Many readers, as educated as ours are, will appreciate the distinction. If I would've left the commas out of that sentence, I would've implied someone else. I rest my case.

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Cooke 3 years, 2 months ago

Highway, I love the idea of your compromise but may be too pig-headed to accept just yet. Here's why:

If we take the first "as" as a preposition, we would also have to classify the second "as" the same way ("AS kind AS Pheobe). Therefore, using your logic, the sentence would read ...several people, as kind, as Pheobe, to guide me. That's just silly.

Further, I would argue that the example sentence you give above would imply exactly the same thing were the (in my opinion erroneous) commas left out.

Exduff: It's not the size of your essential bits...

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MrTaiChi 3 years, 2 months ago

FYI

If you love English, I highly recommend Bill Bryson's book, 'The Mother Tongue.' Bryson is very witty and a good writer. It is not a grammatical explanation, but rather a history of the language.

Among the historical phenomena he recounts is that the English we speak, anchorman English or Pennsylvania English, is more like the English spoken in England in the time of King George III than spoken today by, e.g. ,Prince Charles. 'London' English with soft "r's" and flat "a's" began as an affectation of a stage actor in the 1740s, but became popular with the upper classes like widfire and supplanted what had been spoken previously, except for the incredibly numerous dialects of the lower classes. Bryson asserts that what we understand to be a 'Southern accent" was imported from the southern regions of England when that wave of immigrants settled here. In England, as indicated by a comment in 'The Mayor of Casterbridge' by Thomas Hardy, such a drawl in the southern counties came to be associated with ignorance and low class status and disappeared by the 1860s.

My memory may fail, Spidermite, but I think you wrote in a long time ago to complain about your alien resident status as an English ex-pat and the difficulty of someone who had done everything according to law to become a citizen as opposed to illegals who coast in on successive amensties. I'm an Anglophile, watch the BBC every day and more than a few 'Britcoms'. Got to say that I'm sorry that American slang has infiltrated the language spoken in the old country. Conversely, your countrymen continue to enrich American culture with such useful epithets as, "tosser" and "wanker." Guess we have to shrug and just live with it.

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Brian Kotowski 3 years, 2 months ago

For an enormously entertaining take on the challenges English presents to non-native speakers, I enthusiastically recommend "The Education of Hyman Kaplan", by Leonard Q. Ross (although, I'm pretty sure I've read subsequently that L.Q. Ross was a pseudonym, and more recent editions have been released under the author's real name).

Although best known as a novel, I believe it began as a serial in Harper's Weekly or the New Yorker or some such. In any event, it chronicles the (mis)adventures of Hyman Kaplan and his fellow immigrants as they endeavor to navigate the curriculum of an English for beginners class. Tremendous fun.

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bandmama 3 years, 2 months ago

PEOPPLES PEOPPLES PEOPLLES!!! LOL!!! HAHAHAHHAHAHAAAAA!!!!

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