The work of a citizen committee and the looming vote on the proposed Steamboat 700 annexation have returned affordable housing issues to the cross hairs of local debate. The Fox Creek townhomes on Hilltop Parkway include 30 deed-restricted units built by the Yampa Valley Housing Authority in 2006.

Photo by Matt Stensland

The work of a citizen committee and the looming vote on the proposed Steamboat 700 annexation have returned affordable housing issues to the cross hairs of local debate. The Fox Creek townhomes on Hilltop Parkway include 30 deed-restricted units built by the Yampa Valley Housing Authority in 2006.

Affordable housing in cross hairs

As Steamboat 700 vote looms, committee report adds to debate

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Vote on 700

■ Ballots for the mail-only election will be sent to registered Steamboat Springs voters between Feb. 15 and 19. The election ends March 9.

■ Steamboat 700 is a proposed master-planned community on 487 acres adjacent to the western city limits of Steamboat Springs. The project proposes about 2,000 homes — from apartments to single-family home lots — and 380,000 square feet of commercial development that would be built to the standards of new urbanism (dense, walkable and transit-friendly).

Online

Learn more about the proposed Steamboat 700 annexation at www.steamboatpilot.com/news/steamboat700/

Housing committee

Members of the Affordable Housing Measurement Citizens Committee are Mark Andersen, Scott Ford, Roger Good, Steve Hofman, Doug Labor, Rich Lowe, Mark Scully and Chuck Williamson.

— A report from a citizen committee this week showed the community remains sharply divided about affordable housing, an issue that, like many, will swing with the pendulum of the city’s upcoming vote on the proposed Steamboat 700 annexation.

The Steamboat Springs City Council and members of the public engaged in a broad, two-hour discussion about local housing issues Tuesday during the presentation of findings by a committee asked to analyze measurability of housing needs and programs. The committee found the city is measurability lacking and recommended action including consistent reports of home inventories and work force home ownership, clearer income targets for rental and ownership assistance and annual surveys of local employers to determine up-to-date job and wage data to better assess housing needs.

“Once you know what the permanent work force is going to be and what the trends are in the business community, you’ll have a good idea what the demand is,” committee member Roger Good told the City Council.

But Tuesday’s discussion ranged beyond those recommendations into affordable housing policy and goals. The discussion came under the umbrella of Steamboat 700, which would give the city 15 acres for affordable housing, revenue from a real estate transfer fee and an attainability plan; a new program from the Yampa Valley Housing Authority; and potential changes to the city’s inclusionary zoning ordinance.

The City Council adopted that ordinance in 2006 and linkage a year later. Linkage requires developers to mitigate a percentage of the work force housing their developments are thought to create. The City Council suspended linkage last year and has reduced inclusionary zoning requirements.

Councilman Jim Engelken said Tuesday that he had hoped the report would suggest ways to re-strengthen city affordable housing policies. Steamboat residents including Steve Lewis and Towny Anderson questioned the report’s message.

The report states that a long-term approach to affordable housing policy “should seek to shift the thinking from a reliance on public-funded subsidies to encouraging and assisting business to grow and compete.” The report’s conclusion states “that current policy could not be effectively measured and evaluated. We believe that city resources should not continue to be devoted to approaches that are uncertain and guided by anecdotal information.”

Anderson was a member of the City Council when it passed inclusionary zoning and linkage.

“You can see how some of us are a little bit offended by what we’ve read,” he said, adding that “we’re seeing (inclusionary zoning) be dismantled.”

Committee member Steve Hof­man said the committee recognizes the need for housing policy.

“We understand that assistance distorts markets, but we think assistance is still necessary,” he said.

City Manager Jon Roberts said Thursday that he viewed the recommendations as a tool to assess affordable housing programs in the future.

“I agree that having a mechanism in place to measure the positive impacts of the program will be a great benefit,” Roberts said. “The measurability provided by the committee … could be applied to any proposal that comes forward, whether it’s a down payment assistance program or whether it’s bricks and mortar.”

The City Council agreed to plan a work session to further address housing issues and policy. Hofman said the committee intends to raise awareness of its recommendations.

“We’re going to be engaging a whole lot of community groups in the coming months,” Hofman said.

Housing Authority action

Roberts said the city is talking with the Housing Authority about collaborating on and implementing additional housing programs. The Housing Authority and City Council are scheduled to have a joint meeting Feb. 16.

Mary Alice Page-Allen, asset/program manager for the Housing Authority, said the organization’s board has approved a new down payment assistance program for buyers seeking affordable homes.

Page-Allen said Housing Authority funds now are available for Steamboat-area residents, including those who live in subdivisions west of the city or who work in Steamboat but live in Oak Creek or Hayden.

She said a total of $50,000 is available. Buyers can access a maximum of 5 percent of the purchase price or 5 percent of the property’s appraisal, whichever is less, or a minimum of $1,000.

Page-Allen said the Feb. 16 meeting with City Council could include discussion about a proposal to use fee-in-lieu funds, which developers pay instead of building affordable units, to supplement the down payment program.

Those fees, part of the city’s inclusionary zoning ordinance, also are a source of debate.

The City Council postponed Tuesday a decision about whether to change the fee-in-lieu structure to allow developers the option of paying 50 percent of the fee up front — on the sale of the first 15 percent of units in the development — along with a voluntary real estate transfer fee on every transfer of every unit in the development. The transfer fee was set at 0.2 percent of the unit’s gross sales price in the draft revision, but council members disagreed on its amount and tabled the issue until Feb. 16.

Page-Allen said potential buyers could call the Housing Authority at 870-0167 or work with lenders for more information about down payment assistance. Buyers must have an approved first mortgage lending package to receive the down payment assistance, Page-Allen said.

“I see it becoming a pretty vigorous program here in the near future,” Page-Allen said earlier this week. “It’s a tough time, but hopefully we can help some folks.”

Comments

greenwash 4 years, 10 months ago

Im not sure I understand....If you cant afford to live here why not move to where you can afford?Whats wrong with Hayden,Craig , Oak Creek,stagecoach?I work a couple jobs and managed to buy in Steamboat with out city,state or federal assisatance.I say build a big Apt complex on a portion of city owned or privately held land and call it good.Enough of the subsidies already.

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Tubes 4 years, 10 months ago

agreed, living in steamboat is a choice, not a right. if you cannot afford to live here, then chose to live somewhere you can--no one owes you anything.

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Fred Duckels 4 years, 10 months ago

Greenwash, The subsidies and social engineering keep this publication and half the town busy. Think of our economy.

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jack legrice 4 years, 10 months ago

Thanks greenwash. I am sick of the constant whining that "I want to live in Steamboat but can't afford It". Tough!! All you people want a hand out. After your house then you will want child care. Give me a break!!! There are a lot of us who worked hard and managed to buy here. Steamboat has reached it's saturation point. Go live in one of our out lying areas Besides the 700 there are 2 more developments that are in the same area With all this development will come the time that we will have to dam the Elk river just to have enough water.[ from water study] I have seen what the greed of developers has done to this valley. I do not want to see this happen to the Elk river valley, just so fluffy will have a dog park. As hard as it ay be to accept, west Steamboat should be 35 acre ranchetts. If I remember I think Danny said this was a option if the 700 failed. Please vote no on 700. Save this valley. Save the Elk River valley

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Fred Duckels 4 years, 10 months ago

oneski, I'll be okay, speculating without facts must make you feel good. There seems to be a lot of that on this subject.

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danny 4 years, 10 months ago

Oneski- SB700 is an opportunity to have a more reliable water system without charging the existing residents for it. The Water report attached below stated two areas of concern that should be addressed 1) a 1922 water compact call and 2) a fire in the Fish Creek Basin. Their primary recommendation to address those concerns was to provide a redundant water supply and suggested the Elk River because the City already owned water rights on the Elk River.

The report goes further and states emphatically under aggressive growth projections and under drought conditions there is more than sufficient water supply to serve nearly 3 Sb700’s and double the population within the existing City limits.

The only reason the Elk River would ever be affected would be to provide the community with redundancy- not primary supply.

With SB700 the community doesn't have to pay for their redundancy- without SB700 the community will be the only ones paying for redundancy.

Steamboat Water Supply Master Plan – Prepared by STANTEC Adopted by City Council Nov. 18, 2009

2.3 PROJECTED DEMANDS “…It was therefore determined that a conservative approach should be taken in regards to projecting water demands. The growth in water demands presented in the following sections should therefore be considered as an envelope curve and represent the maximum growth that might be reasonably considered for the City and the MWWD under the most aggressive scenario. These projections include expansion of the Urban Growth Boundary to the west of Steamboat as well as account for an increase in housing densities throughout the water service area. Increasing development density is consistent with trends experienced at many resort communities where real-estate is a premium.”

2.3.1.3 Envelope Projected City Water Demand An envelope curve for the projected total City Demand including Steamboat 700 is shown in Table 2-20and in Figure 2-13. In this analysis it was considered reasonable and conservative to double the projected water demands for Steamboat 700 to account for additional growth in the western portions of the community, both within and beyond the existing service area boundary.
considers SB700 to be 2,600 units – so they project 5200 units in west Steamboat
Table 2-20 accounts for 3%- 4% annual growth within existing City Limits= 80% increase in existing population 10,000 existing resident. + 80%= 18,000 + 13,000(5,200 * 2.5 per per hs hld) =31,000 people

3.2 WATER RIGHT OVERVIEW The FIRM YEILD represents the amount of water that can be considered to be available 100% of the time, even during the most severe drought conditions.

cont...

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danny 4 years, 10 months ago

4.3 WATER CONSERVATION Experience in Denver and other regional communities have shown it is possible to reduce water consumption by 10 to 15 percent without implementing severe restrictions. If implemented, such a program could have the reasonable effect of reducing maximum day water demands by approximately 0.7 to 2 mgd and effectively defer the need for water treatment plant and/or Yampa Well capacity expansion.

5.1.3 Ability to Meet Future Demands The ability for the City and the District to meet anticipated future demands is quite good, based on the following comparison of the projected 20-year Water Demands envelope curve and the calculated firm yield of existing water supply sources available to the City and the District.

1) Both the City and the District have a reliable long-term supply source in the Fish Creek Basin capable of meeting projected demands throughout the next twenty years. Additionally, the existing Yampa River Wells provide a valuable backup and peaking supply source. Maintaining the reliability of these sources and associated infrastructure is critical to the water supply security for the community and should be zealously pursued.

5.2.3 Ability to Meet Future Demands These results indicate that the community in general has several decade to identify, design, and implement the next significant expansion of water supplies for the community. Given the environmental, regulatory, financial, legal, and other requirements associated with the development of water resources, it is not too early to initiate said investigations.

Vote yes on A on March 9th 2009

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danny 4 years, 10 months ago

oneski- Affordable housing isn't about handouts- it's about keeping a competitive community that has housing that its work force can afford. It's a matter of your co-worker being able to be your neighbor, about keeping quality professionals in town like nurses, managers, teachers, City employees etc... It's about keeping the people who make the town special in town after they get off of work. It's about keeping Steamboat Springs a real working town as opposed to only a resort town.

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freerider 4 years, 10 months ago

Affordable housing is on it's way without the 700 farce , the double dip in the recession will keep on driving home prices downward...the real estate community agrees that there is 5 to 7 years worth of inventory on the market ...around 1500 properties counting condo's and single family...now keep on adding more and more foreclosures as your neighbors go underwater on their loans...the guy next to me bought his house in 2006 for $850 k it's now worth $600 k and nobody will buy it. If that was me I would walk away , a quarter million dollar beating in three years . There are no jobs coming on the market and the 700 farce isn't going to provide them...that work force will be imported from Tiajuana . And Danny Boy nice lip service on the water supply , wanna buy some swampland ? We have all seen what happened in Vegas . The city raped by developers and there is a huge water problem in Vegas. One or two drought years here and the same thing is going to happen. You can't guanantee anything just because you say so. And don't even get me started on the joke of a solution for the traffic that these morons have come up with

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Scott Wedel 4 years, 10 months ago

So that is interesting, SB 700 reads the blogs and has time to give a lengthy refutation to the charge that it'll result in damming the Elk River, but makes no comments on extended blog discussion regarding the actual rate of development of SB 700.

Such as rate of development assumed in the City's cost neutrality calculations made during the real estate boom would appear to highly doubtful when Altira which also has access to economic studies is asking for 10 years to start building in Ski Time Square. Consequence of slower than projected rate of development is losses for the City that has to pay upfront and get reimbursed as things are built.

Such as how many affordable and attainable units will be built in 5 and 10 years? So that family pictured in the pro SB 700 newspaper ad might know if they might live in the hoped for SB 700 housing this decade.

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jack legrice 4 years, 10 months ago

Keep the spin coming Danny. There was a reason Mary dumped that property and you took it. Now you are trying to dump it off on us. 35 acre ranchetts. No need for more water. And didn't you state that that was an option when this fails?

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Julie Green 4 years, 10 months ago

2000 homes in S700, $35M = $17,500 tap fee/ home!

And that doesn't take into consideration costs for upgrading the Wastewater Treatment Plant. The Las Vegas Developers are not paying for this; our future homeowners who are supposed to be getting affordable housing are saddled with this cost. And that is just the beginning of the extra costs these homeowners will bear.

Do we really want our small town to grow to 31,000 people?

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TWill 4 years, 10 months ago

Forget about wanting our town to grow to 31,000 people. Why would it grow like that? Are there suddenly going to be that many more jobs and opportunities in this geographically isolated resort town that people will move here to buy a single family home for? Will it be to work in the declining ski, construction, real estate or financial industries? Probably not.

The only reliable occupational fields would be in healthcare, education and civil service. Do you really think that young teachers, nurses or police officers will earn a wage to support purchasing and maintaining a single family home (even at "affordable housing" rates with deed restrictions that will prevent them from selling in the future)?

Let's get back on our feet and sell off our already excessive inventory. Let the free market determine who lives in Steamboat and who lives in Stagecoach, Hayden, Craig, OC, etc. God forbid, anyone would actually have to commute to where they work!

I still don't understand why all this alledged growth is going to occur. Danny, do you have any pearls or wisdom for us on that matter?

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pitpoodle 4 years, 10 months ago

SB 700 is not responsible for water and wastewater treatment expansion. The city agreed to provide potable water for SB 700. And here is what SB 700 is exclusively responsible for, both as to financing and construction. The agreement reads, "Utilities requirements: water and waste water system improvements consistent with requirements of applicable city master plan and site-side master plan. Does not include upgrades to water filtration plant or wastewater plant." So, either the City pays or who does?

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greenwash 4 years, 10 months ago

Does anyone know how many vacant lots are currently on the market or just available in Willow Creek,Stagecoach,OC and Hayden?Probably several thousand is my guess.

How about condo pricing under 300K in SBS?More than ever before.

Rentals available???Hundreds and many will be for sale in next couple months.

Looks like the market is naturally correcting itself on its own.

So why add more?And why the need to subsidize it?

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Tubes 4 years, 10 months ago

oneski is WAY over the line with those comments towards fred. that couldn't be any lower. how have the pilot boys not blocked that by now?

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addlip2U 4 years, 10 months ago

Tubes, oneski comments are his/hers opinion. He/she is entitled to express them as much as you do.

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Tubes 4 years, 10 months ago

taking a shot at fred for someone being tragically killed on his watch couldn't be any further from an opinion. you obviously didn't read the comments before they were deleted. but thanks for coming out.

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Steve Lewis 4 years, 10 months ago

Re: the actual article. This thread begins with views against those people "who who want a handout". The fact is the policy you rail against didn't come from the recipients of affordable housing. That policy came from your neighbors at the original and then the updates of our area plans. Show up next time and tell your neighbors they are wrong. If they agree you won't have to "whine" anymore yourselves.

"Commuting is the answer". Not long term. Scott Myllar on council understands as he noted friends on Oak Creek who spent $800 in a month of commuting. Gas will bite Steamboat's commuters again and again.

"Pay higher wages." Well, maybe if we stop the use of green cards.

Every time one of you use the term "social engineering" you like to think of some subversive group downtown. Reality is you insist on ignoring what's in fairly bold print and endorsed by both the City and the County as the way we plan to grow.

..

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JLM 4 years, 10 months ago

@ Steve #1 ---

The decision to enforce immigration laws is almost a personal decision these days. Call ICE, complain and they will respond.

The problem really is that on a macro level almost everyone is against illegal immigration while on a micro level ("your" dishwasher, laborer, maid, nanny, car washer, cement finisher, etc) everyone is in favor of 'cheap' labor.

If we bought American produced products and championed American labor and production, we would have a different result.

But we are a weak and lazy people at the end of the day. Myself included though I have weaned myself from foreign cars.

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Steve Lewis 4 years, 10 months ago

"Buy American" would put Wal-Mart out of business.

Slogans can be quite shallow, even though they sound great. The powerful lobbies get BUY MINE trade deals which make a joke of this slogan. Smaller American players get the free market and struggle.

Our trade deals insist foreign countrys swallow taxpayer subsidized American corn. We've wrecked the farm economies of many. But there is some ethic in refusing their cars?

This is a topic for another thread. Apologies.

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JLM 4 years, 10 months ago

WalMart is only barely an American company by any standard.

Our country will ultimately be whatever we resolve it to be.

It takes only one brave man to overcome the cowardice of millions. In the face of group think, the one independent thinker is king.

When we resolve to rebuild our economy, we will make the first step.

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Steve Lewis 4 years, 10 months ago

Dear Scott Ford and Roger Good, Thank you, and your housing measurement committee, for your interesting ideas.

I'm inclined to agree with you, during this slump, that your recommendation of downpayment assistance can get some very deserving locals into some very competitively priced property. Frankly I expect prices to drop more, but that's out of my pay grade.

As I mentioned at your presentation, your suggested measurement, creating a list of those in need, via employer surveys will not work well. Its too complicated. As Scott Ford pointed out, the small employers matter a lot, and there are more than 1,000 of them in town. Hey, if the employers were considering investing some $ into housing, then you might be onto something. But the recent rejection of Linkage (employee housing) suggests they are not.

I was not being flippant when I suggested the list of need is precisely the line of cars full of people who have to commute hours to their job in Steamboat. Put up a sign, solve their need, and you hit the bulls eye. Damn simple.

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Steve Lewis 4 years, 10 months ago

And Roger, This article says you'll be spreading your recommendations through Steamboat. It’s a worthy conversation. Thanks.

But please as you go forward; allow the work of those before you an honest appraisal. Your report introduces YOUR new goal (intended beneficiary) and then frequently complains how poorly our regulation supports this goal it never had. A little sincerity to our regulations’ STATED goal – more UNITS of deed restricted housing stock - would find that goal recognized and reiterated throughout existing codes. Perhaps you missed this Implementation Program document (i.e. our goals). It’s short and unmistakably clear:

http://steamboatsprings.net/sites/default/files/page/2196/community_housing_ImplementationProgram_draft2.pdf

UNITS were the goal. Please re-read this document, and reconsider your statement, "our regulations lack a clear goal". Be sure to read the bottom of page 3, which states a goal of x UNITS per year in each of several income levels. How much clearer can a goal get?

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Steve Lewis 4 years, 10 months ago

Finally, Its worth noting that the professional consultants in 2004 recommended a layer cake approach. We shouldn’t try to solve the whole problem with any one tool. It never works. Pick a layer of the problem, pick a tool to solve it. Then pick another layer. The 05-07 council chose to build affordable deed restricted (ownership) UNITS.

Rather than ignore their advice and try to solve it all with a new tool from scratch, please consider leaving the existing tool in place and show us how to add a second and third tool to solve the adjacent and unaddressed needs.

Your group is expressly not interested in measuring the revenue goals of this effort overall (which are falling off a cliff), and that makes no sense to me at all. I inquired about the "other group that looked into (program) revenues". More bad news - that was the group that recommended the coming cuts of revenues from Inclusionary Zoning to 1/4 their previous level.

The effort to create workforce housing in Steamboat is shrinking as we speak. My concern Roger, is that your committee intends to shrink it further still.

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Scott Wedel 4 years, 10 months ago

Steve Lewis, You are doing a great disservice to your cause by disputing the report instead of taking it to heart as valid criticism.

If you want to say that the goal of the creating deed restricted units program was to create deed restricted units and it succeeded at creating deed restricted units then go ahead and make that argument. And watch the public support for that program to continue to vanish. The real world goal of that program, as stated by its supporters at the time was to allow teachers, firefighters, nurses (and whatever other popular job category that came to mind) to live in SB. Was that goal ever measured?

And the completely inept Iron Horse purchase and mismanagement has obviously severely damaged any subsequent attempts at providing workforce housing. The other reason efforts to create workforce housing has greatly diminished is that THERE ARE NOW A THOUSAND FEWER JOBS than last year. Keep on defending that purchase and keep proving your critics right. If you cannot realize that it was fatally flawed by overpaying at the peak of the real estate market then you show why affordable housing programs DO NOT BELONG AS PART OF CITY GOVERNMENT.

It seems impossible to deny that the affordable housing programs have received far less public support than the general idea of affordable housing. Seems to me that the report implicitly describes the sort of groundwork that is needed to build public support for whatever housing program which advocates like you failed to do.

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Steve Lewis 4 years, 10 months ago

Scott, Did you read the report before posting your comment?

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Steve Lewis 4 years, 10 months ago

You seem more iinterested in beating me up than commenting on what I said. I said:

1) I agreed the near future is a good time to follow the report's recommendation of downpayment assistance.

2) The employer survey seemed a difficult and even misplaced measurement, if you are interested in housing demand. If the intended benificiary is the bigger businesses, the survey makes more sense.

3) The report's overarching complaint is incoherent policy. This is based entirely on the committee's choice to ignore the policy's stated goal - building units.

4) I ask that we add their ideas to what exists, Inclusionary Zoning.

..

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Steve Lewis 4 years, 10 months ago

We could similarly criticize a lot of private sector people and businesses for the faults you lay on the Iron Horse and on affordable housing programs. Everything has crumbled. Everyone’s plans look inept today. Neither of us find any will to shame them. Your posture on affordable housing is simply wrong.

Mike Forney and Dean Vogelar are the City’s financial advisors re: the Iron Horse. They spoke to CC last Tuesday. Their comments maintained a respect for the goals of that property and were optimistic about the investment's future.

Typically in Steamboat in 2008, the deed restricted units had a higher percentage of contracts offered than the free market units in these projects. Nationally deed restricted foreclosures are less than free market foreclosures. There were problems here with the banks. Financing was a glitch for everything. The IZ ordinance was not the failure, witness all the other towns where these work.

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Steve Lewis 4 years, 10 months ago

I won't deny these programs receive less support than the general idea of affordable housing. Two reasons stand out for me: - Government is inefficient in general. - Steamboat's development community had minimal support for affordable housing regulation, even during the boom. Their economic woes since have been overly blamed on the regulation. Most were allowed a profitable release of their AH units to free market sale.

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Scott Wedel 4 years, 10 months ago

If a goal is workforce housing then it does make sense to survey the employers. Surveying he big employers that bring in lots of seasonal workers can give a good idea of how many units are needed and the other issues. And they can give not just personal stories, but numbers as in employees and units.

You should accept the criticism that policy has been incoherent. Building units should be a tactical objective of the policy. Just as it is incompetent and incoherent for the policy of a country fighting a war to be "kill enemy soldiers", it is just as incompetent and incoherent for an affordable housing policy to be "build units".

The policy was so incoherent that buying Iron Horse made sense to a City Council.

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Scott Wedel 4 years, 10 months ago

Most were allowed a profitable release of their AH units to free market sale.

So a developer had to go through the process of designing units that they didn't want to build, but was required by the City and the result was something so messed up that no one wanted to buy it under the program. And affordable housing rules were not simple and consistent, but instead resulted in every major development negotiating tolerable terms. Hmm, wonder why that was not popular with anyone.

I haven't found anyone that seriously blames the current economic woes on SB's housing regulations. SB's housing regulations did cost certain developers money by forcing them to create a product that no one wanted. It is not exactly "no harm, no foul" to then let the developer sell them at the market prices after the market collapsed.

And the goal was not just "build units" because developers were also supposed to build affordable units in their otherwise high end projects as compared to being allowed to buy "offsets" via subsidizing units elsewhere in the City.

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Steve Lewis 4 years, 10 months ago

I'll start from your last. Developers could create the units elsewhere, such as Edgemont using Sunburst units. Projects at the snow base could pay in lieu.

Developers overly blamed their economic woes on the regs – was my comment. "These regulations nearly bankrupted local developments", a city councilor last Tuesday night.

The ordinance did cost developers money. You are surprised that they didn't like it? We are the first town in Colorado to reduce their inclusionary zoning. I've agreed ours needed revision on the unit types sought, but this does work in the other towns. Its also a matter of politics and profit in our local debate, or perhaps you would you agree with those regs in other towns?

The Iron Horse has PLENTY of company in this economy. And you ignore Forney and Vogelar (above). It’s pointless argument when you can't acknowledge that. You are probably commenting here on a report and on City policy you've never read. If so, lets stop short of debating what is coherent government policy.

We all know small business is key. Scott Ford, in this report, agrees they are crucial. And he notes Steamboat has more than 1,000 businesses with between 1 and 5 employees. I don't argue their survey shouldn't be attempted. I just doubt its accuracy. But ask an employer what measures will get his workers into local housing. He'll either assume a hell of a lot, or he'll go ask his workers a lot of questions. Seems simpler to survey the folks in all those cars aimed at Steamboat every morning.

Finally, Inclusionary Zoning is dormant until there is growth, and profit speculated. There is no regulation here that expresses a rationale for building AH units today.

A fair question: If you would end Inclusionary Zoning and its funding, what recommendation would you suggest prepares us for Steamboat's workforce need ten years from today?

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