Max May, 15, took home several certificates from Colorado legislators for his selection as Corpsmember of the Year for the Steamboat Springs Community Youth Corps. The Steamboat Springs resident also is active in 4-H, wrestling and ranch work.

Photo by Margaret Hair

Max May, 15, took home several certificates from Colorado legislators for his selection as Corpsmember of the Year for the Steamboat Springs Community Youth Corps. The Steamboat Springs resident also is active in 4-H, wrestling and ranch work.

Steamboat youth honored for hard work

Max May, 15, one of 10 youth corps members to receive award

Advertisement

For more information

Applications for 2010 positions with the Steamboat Springs Community Youth Corps will be available later this month. For more information or to download an application, go to www.steamboatsprings.net/rec and click on “teen programs,” or contact program director Brooke Lightner at 879-4300 ext. 355 or blightner@steambo.... The program is open to Routt County teens ages 14 to 16.

The Rocky Mountain Youth Corps provides similar work programming for people ages 16 to 25. Learn more at www.rockymountainyouthcorps.org.

— Looking back on his two weeks of service with the Steamboat Springs Comm­unity Youth Corps, the crew leaders who worked with 15-year-old Steamboat resident Max May described him as “a stellar corps member” who “showed great capacity for learning and working hard.”

Those traits recently ear­ned Max recognition from the Colorado Youth Corps Association as a 2009 Corps­member of the Year.

At an awards ceremony at the Colorado State Capitol on Jan. 25, Max joined nine other Colorado youths being recognized for their efforts working with youth corps groups during summer 2009. Having completed his two weeks of service while he was 14, Max was the youngest worker to receive Corpsmember of the Year honors.

State Sen. Al White, R-­Hayden, presented Max an honorary plaque. U.S. Rep. John Salazar, D-Colo., and U.S. Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo., sent staff members with congratulatory certificates and letters.

Max said the job — which required a week’s worth of reporting to Howelsen Hill at 7 a.m., hiking for half an hour and spending the rest of the day building trails — taught him how to work hard. His group spent a week in town repairing trails on Emerald Mountain and a week camping and working outside of town, he said. He was one of about 60 teenagers employed in the 2009 program, said Brooke Lightner, local youth corps program director.

Coming to the youth corps from a ranch family, Max brought knowledge about hands-on work with him, said his mother, Nancy May. Still, it was a new experience for him “to be out there sunup to sundown working,” she said.

Max is the fourth generation of May family members to live and work on a ranch in Routt County, Nancy May said. The family owns land as part of May S-S Family Partnership.

Working with his father, Stuart May, and other family members on the ranch, Max dedicates time to raising pigs for 4-H. He took home a Grand Champion honor in Swine Showmanship in 2008 and is getting ready to enter the swine breeding category for the first time this year.

Max originally is from Ukraine; he joined the Mays in Steamboat Springs in 2007. As a sixth- and seventh-grader at Steamboat Springs Middle School, he collected several wins on the school’s wrestling team and volunteered at the Steamboat Springs Animal Shelter. Max plans to start at Steamboat Springs High School in the fall after learning at home this year. He’ll start his third season of middle school wrestling this month.

“He has really just immersed himself in everything,” Nancy May said. “He definitely has gotten involved in many aspects of the community.”

Max said he plans to apply to work with Community Youth Corps again this summer.

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Requires free registration

Posting comments requires a free account and verification.