White seeks marijuana change

State senator worries medical pot industry will be a ‘free-for-all’

Advertisement

photo

Al White

— State Sen. Al White wants to change the way medical marijuana is grown and distributed in Colorado, but federal law is standing in the way of his plans.

White, R-Hay­den, last week iss­ued a news release stating that he wanted the state to create a mono­poly on medi­cal marijuana to prevent what he described as a “free-for-all.” It went on to say that White was drafting legislation that would have the state grow marijuana that would then be dispensed by licensed pharmacies.

But White has since learned that although the federal government has signaled it will not focus on prosecuting medical marijuana cases in states where medicinal marijuana has been legalized, the drug cannot be distributed by pharmacies. Marijuana remains a Schedule 1 controlled substance. Pharmacies are licensed to distribute only substances classified as Schedule 2 and lower.

On Monday, White said he wanted the state to grow and distribute the drug to ensure that dispensaries don’t turn to the black market to meet demand.

“What I have heard anecdotally from consumers is the prices are shooting up 200 to 300 percent,” White said. “What we’re seeing happen is demand outpacing supply, and when that happens, a dispensary owner, while having the best intentions, is not going to leave his shelf spaces empty with no product to sell.”

White said that could mean turning to drug dealers, but he said he has not heard of that happening at any dispensary yet.

Charlie Magnuson, co-owner of D and C Medical Marijuana, LLC and Therapeutic Massage in Steamboat Springs, said his business has not had any trouble meeting demand, and he emphasized that his business follows the law. He also said he realizes medical marijuana is more expensive than illegally purchased drugs, but he hopes that will change as the market matures.

“I’m hoping it will come down where legal medical marijuana is lower than anything on the black market, and that will discourage people from using the black market,” he said.

Magnuson declined to give the prices of marijuana sold at his dispensary.

White said the intention for his planned legislation was to bring more reliability to the medical marijuana market, not to discourage it.

“I’m trying to bring reliable quality review and consistent quality to the program, and also some professional respectability to the dispensation of it,” he said. “The federal government seems to be the biggest stumbling block in that.”

White said he is now stumped about how to create the change he would like to see in medical marijuana law, and he’s leaving future legislation up to other lawmakers.

“I honestly couldn’t come up with anything other than this that resolved the problem,” he said.

Comments

mmjPatient22 4 years, 5 months ago

Aich, is that you?

Anyway, this guy. Wow! So, the state is going to start buying land and employing a pot farming force? Maybe, you could get all the inmates that were arrested for growing pot, and make them legally grow pot for the state? Boy, talk about cheap labor! If you start running out of good pot farmers, you just go arrest some more. Sound logic. Sounds like slavery actually. I can't believe this guy got elected. He obviously has no clue how the medical marijuana industry works and he doesn't personally know anyone involved in the industry. I'm really, for lack of a better word, disgusted by the approach this guy is taking. And I would love to see the baffoons lined up that pay 200-300% of normal prices for marijuana. This guy needs to go read a copy of "The Emperor Wears No Clothes." And that goes for you too Aich. It's a very informative book.

0

aichempty 4 years, 5 months ago

mmj,

No, this guy is your problem, oh, and the federal laws that control drugs.

While the majority of pot smokers may feel the way you do, Mr. White is in the majority of people with political influence who will elect representatives to do what's good for the people donating the money to them.

You're smoking on borrowed time. Trying to get around the state and federal laws will probably result in people being put in a place where medical marijuana will definitely not be available; federal prison.

0

Scott Wedel 4 years, 5 months ago

Al White is correct that Colorado marijuana needs state laws to clarify the situation.

Are dispensaries profit or nonprofit companies?

How does the whole patient with permission to grow 6 plants and such work when there is also a grower and dispensary involved? Presumably, the ability to grow, process and possess a particular amount of MJ is being spread among all the these people involved. And doesn't that imply that at the dispensary that the patient is being asked to buy what already belongs to them?

Is a dispensary obligated to perform some sort of potency testing and verification?

And Aic, I'm surprised that you have so completely what is culturally and politically going on with medical marijuana. It is intended as a way to legalize marijuana while keeping it illegal for kids, illegal in public and limiting the pothead's usage to a reasonable amount. No one is going to federal prison for medical marijuana except for side issues such as tax evasion.

0

aichempty 4 years, 5 months ago

Scott,

The history of law enforcement contact with medical marijuana users around here indicates that at least some of them also tend to dabble in other substances, as well as showing the potential for trafficking by having way too much of the stuff when compared to what is "legal" under Colorado law.

I think the elephant on the thread is that we can't accuse anyone of committing a crime without proof, but a person with a medical marijuana license has a perfect excuse for possessing small quantities which can be sold illegally without anybody knowing the difference. Do ya really think that there's not any trafficking going on under the guise of medically allowed use and possession?

ACET seems to have a lot of problems putting 2 and 2 together to get 4 (which I believe is partially due to insiders tipping off traffickers to ACET activities), but if I was doing their math I would certainly start by conducting surveillance of medical marijuana users as potential sources of illegally sold and distributed marijuana.

Get an excuse to search a medical user's home/office/vehicle and who knows what might turn up? Peyote? Cocaine? Crystal meth? Unfortunately, where there's smoke, there's fire, and someone openly using medical marijuana takes the guesswork out of who might be using the stuff.

So, it's not a stretch to figure out that a good place to look for violations that might, indeed, result in federal imprisonment would be around those who are using marijuana, legally or not. I think it would have to be a significant criminal enterprise to attract the attention of the DEA or even the local authorities, but little ones turn into big ones as time goes by and the perpetrators become overconfident. A couple of the recent local cases have been a result of accidental exposure. The more trafficking that goes on, the greater the chance of somebody stumbling over it, and I think it's a no-brainer that the medical marijuana community is a likely place to sniff around.

People usually don't know that serial killer Ted Bundy was NEVER apprehended by police looking for a murderer. Every time he was captured, it was after a traffic stop. If he'd been a better driver, he might be alive and doing his "work" to this day.

If not for a curious landlord, an animal neglect complaint and a girl urinating on the sidewalk, three of the recent pot cases would never have been discovered. Medical marijuana opens up a whole new container of invertebrates, and the police know that some people using legally are probably selling illegally. All it's going to take is a few undercover "compliance checks" if the cops care enough to try. I think that a medical marijuana license, for some, is just a way to get in way over their heads.

0

boater1 4 years, 5 months ago

what a political tool he is! think hommer simpson w/ a quote above his head.

"that evil pot is so bad for you keep it illegal... oh wait now it's legal for some and the small guy is making $, but we're not? that's not right, we want control & to make all the $ why because we're the government & we know best"

0

boater1 4 years, 5 months ago

scott, take the blinders of man. you're using the same BS arguement as white. it's ALL about $ and the taxes the state can get from it.

0

mmjPatient22 4 years, 5 months ago

First, you couldn't be any more ignorant of the types of people that acquire medical marijuana licenses from their state of residency. Your view that patients are buying up bundles of medicine to distribute to the general public is completely erroneous and offensive to the majority of medical marijuana patients. Not to mention that you apparently still think that most medical marijuana patients must be dabbling in a little bit of everything else and they're probably selling it to every one else. You don't have to be a navigator to find the BS there. That's like saying, "a crackhead must be a pothead/methhead/basehead, because he is a crackhead." Maybe the guy just likes crack, you don't know. Secondly, there is no borrowed time on which I can smoke. I may have been medicating illegally before I received my doctor's recommendation for medicinal marijuana, but right & wrong seems to be fairly relative in the whole RE-legalization debate. The fact that the Colorado State Board of Health has people in its ranks that would try to just up and change the rules, based on some sort of "emergency," is proof enough that right & wrong, at least in this case, is up for debate. Some people, with very jaded views, are all upset that their precious marijuana prohibition is going to see its last sunset one of these days. They've been convinced by their government, sponsored by big synthetic pharmaceuticals and industrial companies, that marijuana will be the downfall of the nation should it be allowed to permeate our society(even though it already has). For a plant that contains over 60 therapeutic compounds and has over 3,500 years of documentation(without one overdose death ever being documented) depicting it as the most used, or one of the most used plants for medicinal purposes in China, India, the Middle and Near East, Africa, and pre-Roman Catholic Europe (prior to 476 A.D.).....there sure are a lot of ignorant people that can't see past the lies given to them by their government.

Mr. White is far from a concern to me. His ideas are made from pure lunacy and they'll never see the light of day as a law. In a quote from him in a Westword article on the same subject, he claims that if there is marijuana sold illegally, there's a 90% chance that it came from some Mexican drug cartel. Even is this were something other than fantasy, wouldn't encouraging more registered, independent caregivers and growers be the way to fix the problem? There is no way for any drug cartel to profit from illegal weed sales to dispensaries if their entire client base is getting their medicine from a local, registered grower or group of registered growers that, in turn, supply the dispensaries. It's called business. We build American business(es) to support and provide for the American ideal(s) that have been important enough for us to legislate.

0

mmjPatient22 4 years, 5 months ago

Ya know, for someone that admittedly doesn't "have a dog in the legalization fight," you sure do get all up in arms about every single one of the articles that mention my medicine. In fact, one could surmise that you bear a prejudice for me and all the other people that choose the same medicine that I do. Maybe it was your traumatic experience at the lumber yard, or maybe you're just trying to make yourself out to be better than everyone that chooses cannabis as their medicine, I don't know. But whatever it is, you admittedly have nothing to do with anything that talks about the RE-legalization of marijuana. Yet you persistently pester everyone on here that advocates marijuana and disagrees with current federal law. You're just a bully and an ignorant one at that. You're looking for a fight, and that's fine. You just might want to find one you can win. The points you're arguing have already been defeated by people that are smarter than you or me.

0

mmjPatient22 4 years, 5 months ago

If she gets a license from the state, she won't have to worry about going to jail for medicating in Colorado.

0

kathy foos 4 years, 5 months ago

AichYou maybe right in assuming that some persons would break the law on medical m.j. by selling other illegal drugs,but if youget rid of the illegal mexicans that are bringing it on in to this country,and taking our jobs while they are at it,maybe that is a good direction for the law to go clean up some bad drugs?If the border crashers dont get stopped then the meth will just keep showing up delivered by your local construction worker mexican.You seem to want to classify m.j. as hard drug like the others,the voters of theis state have said otherwise,get over it or start a petition to vote out the current m.j. laws that the people have passed.I hope law inforcement gets every other illegal drug in this county and throws the book at them,not just send them back to mexico to bring back more drugs to sell.The hard drug problem is obviously bad enough in this valley to keep the law busy as they could be..If someone that has a permit to use m.j. gets raided and accused of hard drugs there should be a double penelty for them,but if the law is just curioius on the issue and they raid a home for that and there are no hard drugs found,they should be personally sued .

0

trump_suit 4 years, 5 months ago

Aich, you are so far off on this issue that to paraphrase Barney Frank: "Discussing this any further would be lke aguing with the Kitchen Table"

0

mmjPatient22 4 years, 5 months ago

Looks like there aren't too many of Mr. White's constituents that care to comment on his grand plans for Colorado. Either their technological prowess is the same vintage as their views on cannabis or they're just too ashamed to admit their support of him in an open forum.

0

Glenn Little II 4 years, 5 months ago

Heres to the opposition of Aich !! May the culture of patients in Colorado outgrow the government... The best way for the marijuana industry to flourish is to ignore the comments that Aich and anyone else says. Who cares what anybody thinks it is up to the patients now. Nothing you can do to stop it!

0

mmjPatient22 4 years, 5 months ago

Hey there Skifreelivelove, that's a pretty cool picture ya got there. The leaf on mine is fairly dainty.

0

freerider 4 years, 5 months ago

AICH ...your not going to win this argument , you sound like a right wing ignorant bully that buys into government propaganda and you might as well have a swastika next to your avatar ... there's a reason that Breckinridge won this battle with a frekin landslide vote. Nobody in this day and age believes anything the government tells us or listens to people like you. People that are against legalization are either stupid sheep that believe the government lies about marijuana which is impossible to overdose on or they are making a fortune off it and don't want to see it grown for free. The feds always want their piece of the pie and they know if they leagalize it will be worthless. The drug war is the scam of the century , why do you think we are really in Afgani-scam ? Answer = OPIUM . The sad thing is the Taliban sells Opium to China and the U.S.A. to finace their war . So we are financing our enemy . Solution = legalization .... NOT WAR ...Holland did it and they have half the drug abuse as we do . Here's the other thing about legalizing drugs. Jail doesn't work , it cruel and inhumane . Where's the empathy for drug abuser's . They need help not jail . If I have a friend or somebody that needs help from alcohol , nicotine , pharma , drugs or whatever they need re-hab .... not jail and it will stop all the drug cartels in their tracks. I would rather see people get help than financing drug cartels that buy weapons of mass destruction with drug money . Anybody that supports keeping drugs illegal means they are supporting terrorist's and drug cartels .

0

aichempty 4 years, 5 months ago

freebie,

Holland has 1/2 the drug abuse we do because they are a far less diverse population and don't share a border with MEXICO.

I know a lot of parents whose kids are suffering as a result of drug abuse. The kids got it from other kids whose parents don't care, or can't stop their kids from trafficking.

There will always be a few people who can abuse drugs and not go to jail, or not go bankrupt, or suffer any other fate that puts them out of their homes and onto the street. What about the others? Not your problem?

I know one kid right now who was pulled out of public school and home-schooled through high school because he couldn't resist the urge to use drugs. He's just like his old man (who's not in the home). The problem is that he graduated from high school, and now he's in community college, and guess what? He's well on the way to being a world-class loser and nothing makes him happy, and he has no ambition, and it's all thanks to the drugs he can buy on campus.

Tell me, Grasshopper, how legalizing drugs is going to help him.

Legalize euthanasia too?

I don't know about you, but why would anybody want to keep a drug-abusing adult around the house and support him? Oh, around here, of course, it would be for his drug connections . . .

The people who are pro-legalization are not thinking about the "least of us." They are thinking about themselves, with no regard to the problems that drugs cause for others.

I wonder . . . how many "successful" drug abusers in Steamboat have taken in an "unsuccessful" abuser to support and care for? Maybe if you had a couple of 20-something kids living at home that you had to support, you'd understand how it is for MOST of the families whose kids go down the tubes from drug abuse.

0

mmjPatient22 4 years, 5 months ago

Aich, the line between use and abuse doesn't seem to exist to you. Granted, abuse is horrible. It can ruin lives. We all know this. However, the solution to curbing the abuse of a substance does not include making it illegal for anyone to buy/sell/grow/possess/use it and locking-up the ones that happen to be unlucky enough to get caught by the law. If a child has an addiction to cookies that propels him/her to seek out cookies constantly, the solution is not to make the cookies really difficult to obtain. This will only induce whining and some imaginative attempts at getting to the cookies. By regulating the cookie distribution, the amount of cookie consumption can be monitored/controlled and the child will be appeased by knowing that they will get their cookies, even if it's not as many cookies as they'd like. Punishing the child's desire for cookies by making the cookies non-existent will only serve to fuel the desire for cookies. But this only treats the addiction to cookies. To truly combat an issue, you must get at it's core to be successful. How did the child procure the desire to consume so many cookies as to become addicted to them in the first place? One only has to look at television advertising and vending machines to find a path in the right direction. Bad parenting might be another direction to take. But trying to take the cookies away might not yield too many positive results. Our history has shown that simply prohibiting the things that are widely desired only serves to create and nourish a black market for them. Your argument is that you'd rather see the black market for marijuana continue to prosper and thrive than see it legalized. History has also shown that the "war on drugs" has not been, and will most likely never be successful at eradicating marijuana from America. It's just not feasibly possible. And because of this fact, the Mexican drug cartels are allowed to find a marketplace, however black it may be, to distribute the "fruits" of their labor(s) and send the subsequent profit(s) back home to Mexico. Like America needs to be hemorrhaging anymore money, especially to Mexico! Through legalizing and further regulating the most profitable substance(s) that the black-market(s) revolve(s) around, we will be eliminating the vacuum that sucks these violent drug cartels into our cities and neighborhoods. This will not only clean up the black-market but it just might curb some of the illegal immigration that plagues our nation.

0

Dumpy_the_Wise 4 years, 5 months ago

And there Aich goes again, with another inspirational post about how his life is greater than ours and beats all facts entirely. You see Aich, it is so easy to just start posting stories, how do we know it is even true? I'll give you an example:

Some of my friends have used cannabis and still reached Honor Roll. Some of them also quit because they wanted to."

See? A story (even if it is true) is not at all convincing. And your next post will probably say something like "oh, of course it's not true because it never happens". Remember, I am giving you an example of your own so called "arguments". Try coming up with some facts, and then we will talk.

0

bandmama 4 years, 5 months ago

aich- just wondering, why do you assume that all mj comes from Mexico? I cant help but notice your repeated slights to minorities and those you so obviously feel are inferior to yourself. You had mentioned in a previous post that you had been asked to run for a certain public office. Please do tell us details, we can already see your platform. I just want to make sure I vote for the other candidate, whomever they may be they have to be more open minded than you.

0

mmjPatient22 4 years, 5 months ago

There's no telling how worried we should or shouldn't be about his candidacy for anything. Seeing as how this country allowed two terms of George W Bush to be perpetrated on itself, I suppose even Aich's election isn't entirely impossible. But I don't think there's enough idiots up here to validate his platform. The fact that not one single person seems to be coming to his defense on any of these little comment sections is all the proof I need to support that claim.

0

aichempty 4 years, 5 months ago

Dumpy,

I'm sure your story is true. I have friends who used pot and gave it up and became reasonably successful . . . although it took them an extra 7 or 8 years to graduate from college, and they only gave up, oh, maybe $100,000 - $200,000 in lifetime earnings as a result.

You can't understand how using pot will hurt you until it does. Part of being a pot user is that when you use enough of it, it takes away the hurt. Alcohol is the same way for some people, or other drugs.

The teenager in my home doesn't understand that he's going to spend 4 years in college anyway, and the difference between majoring in education or pre-med ten years from now will be huge in terms of how he spends his future. He can be a highschool teacher and coach football either way, but taking the easy path now means that his other choices will be limited if the coaching gig doesn't work out like he hopes. He thinks he can be happy making less money as a coach than as a physical therapist, or a doctor, or a nurse, but he hasn't tried it yet. Five or six years from now, if the decision he wants to make today turns out to be the wrong one, he can be left with no choice but to go back to school for 2-3 years to make up for what he could be doing now when he doesn't have to work to support himself.

So, I'll only say back to you that if you're a kid in school, and you think pot use will never hurt you, you may be wrong about that. If kids had the wisdom and experience of mature adults, they'd be legally able to do anything that adults can do. In fact, kids are immature and they don't know how much they don't know. That's the problem. If kids were just small adults, it wouldn't be an issue.

mmj, you really need to get a handle on the fact that I think making marijuana legal for medical purposes is a good idea. The line between theraputic and addictive use is the one that may be fuzzy for you, but that's your cross to bear. The only thing you don't seem to realize is that a person cannot spend most of the day intoxicated by any substance and work responsibly at a job. I would prefer to see pot sold by pharmacies and properly regulated to discourage abuse, but I still don't see how that's going to prevent kids from getting the stuff from the black market. We can't stop kids from getting alcohol, and it has been legal for adults for a long time. So how do they get it? Mostly from adults. Why would pot be different?

mama,

In case you hadn't noticed, the Mexican borders are wide open to smuggling. There's lots of unguarded coastline. Stuff that goes into Mexico from other countries ends up in the United States. It's a fact. The Netherlands has a nice wide ocean between it and drug producing countries, with Belgium and Germany bordering it on the land side. If you'd rather have the Germans in charge of Mexico, why not pitch the idea to them? It's about time for them to get restless again . . .

0

bandmama 4 years, 5 months ago

aich- there is a lot of it grown right here in the good old USA...... Ever heard of I-44? Med West right of way. You are avoiding my not so subtle hint that some of your comments are racist. And the details of which public office you feel you should fill? MMJ- you are correct, two Bush terms are more than enough to make sure that there is never another old white male bigot in any public office......who considers the amount of money one makes is what shapes a person. Instead of a persons happiness and QUALITY of life. Sort of ironic isn't it that Mr Aich who served the county so proudly is so willing to take away others right to persue happiness. Yup.

0

aichempty 4 years, 5 months ago

Altered perceptions can be very entertaining, but I'm getting tired of reading all of yours.

You get a pot legalization issue on the ballot, and I'll vote for it. I promise.

Now all you have to do is convince everybody else. Go door to door. It should be quite an experience for you.

0

bandmama 4 years, 5 months ago

LOL! Aich you are still posting under the assumption that all concerned with this issue regularly/daily/all the time smoke a bit of reefer. You do recall that some of us dont? You do recall that the issue is the right for a patient to be pro active in the treatment that works best for his/her illnesses and symptoms. Not drug wars, not stereotypical racist comments about inner city whatever situations that you seem to know everything about. It is a patients right to consult with a physician to find a way to feel better and be more productive than a lump a clay. Thats it. Nothing more sinister than helping sick people. Again, no one here is trying to entice children to smoke a bowl. Although you keep bringing it up. If anyone child were to get ideas, it would be due to your comments.

0

trump_suit 4 years, 5 months ago

I warned you all. "Kitchen Table" However if you pick at one long enough with a pocket knife................... I believe that we just got a commitment from Aich to vote "Yes" on legalization. Maybe we have in fact produced a small change with our conversation.

0

bandmama 4 years, 5 months ago

aich has written many times that he is all for medical use.

0

mmjPatient22 4 years, 5 months ago

Small change? The hypocrite that rants on and on and on against those that would love nothing more than to see it legalized flat out, who says that he'd grow it for profit if it were legal federally.....he says he'd check "yes" on the ballot. I'm not that impressed. He's still ridiculous about the whole thing. I think he just enjoys arguing with us. Likes the punishment or something.

0

bandmama 4 years, 5 months ago

mmj- well said. It isn't liking punishment. I think he's lonely...... not hard to assume.

0

aichempty 4 years, 5 months ago

I said I'll vote for it, and I will, if you can get enough registered voters to sign a petition to put it on the ballot. I want to see the support you claim to have. I seriously doubt that my one vote would be the one to decide the issue.

Mama, when I was a senior in college I lived in an apartment in a big city near the "strip" area where drug dealing was a major business. I saw who came and went from the other apartments. I was also there when a person was shot to death in the apartment upstairs from mine over a drug deal gone bad. My father in law who ran a business in the same city wore a pistol on his belt right out in the open for protection, and was beaten and robbed the ONE DAY that he got complacent and left it at home. Need I go on? How about my friend who was stabbed to death in his property management office in Baltimore one day during a robbery? I think I happen to know more about the problems than you give me credit for. The people who want to be intoxicated all the time and have no visible (legal) means of support are not going to suddenly get square jobs and buy legal pot if it becomes available. We'll still have the problems of poverty and addiction, which can only be cured by education, which cannot happen when all the kids are smoking dope. The "bigger" town near my second home is in the throes of the recession and businesses are closing down while crime is going up. That town's school system has a graduation rate of about 50%. Do the math. None of these problems, which exist in most urban areas around the country, are going to be helped by legalizing drugs for the general population.

Health care costs near my second home are very high because there are so many unemployed and uninsured people who seek medical care. One large employer recently closed a tire factory (1 of 3 they operate) because of the costs of health care. Two other national corporations (a pharmaceutical company and a consumer products company) have reduced the size of their operations for the same reason. This is in a town where you can get a 1500 square foot house, newer construction, for under $125,000.00. Wages are lower than the national average, energy and housing costs are very affordable, and you'd think that business would be anxious to expand there.

No. Why? The local workforce is undereducated, the schools are inferior, and crime is a growing problem. The state pumps in money for education and opportunity is abundant (2 colleges in town), but the place is going down the tubes. Drugs, poverty and crime all go together, and the situation over there proves that given the choice, people will choose to be intoxicated over being employed, safe, and financially secure. Increasing the supply of drugs is not going to solve any of those problems. Legalizing pot and other recreational drugs will not bring a single person back into the workforce.

(cont.)

0

aichempty 4 years, 5 months ago

One of the reasons I moved here was to escape crime back east. The boys from the 'hood were moving out to the suburbs to commit armed robberies and carjackings, and it seemed like a good place to move away from.

I can easily understand why people living around here would want pot to be legalized, and we're not in much danger of developing a "hood" plagued by crime and poverty. We are in the minority among towns of this size in the United States, however, and unfortunately the rest of the country has much bigger problems.

Why is it that, in a town that voted for Obama in part because he wants the United States to be more aligned with the rest of the world's nations, the locals don't want to be concerned with the problems in the rest of our own country?

That's easy to answer; because most people here are only sympathetic to their own needs, and don't care about anybody else. They resent the tourists that provide our income. It goes on and on. We live in a childish society, and that's our biggest problem with drugs, housing and all the rest.

0

mmjPatient22 4 years, 5 months ago

Ya know Aich, I wouldn't be too surprised to see it on our local ballot with-in the next 2-3 elections. I know more than a few people that would proudly tote a petition clipboard around town for that particular ballot issue. We might not have a landslide like Breck did but I think there are enough sensible people in this town to get it passed. I must admit though, it's weird to imagine you among the ranks of the sensible. As far as your property on the east coast goes, sounds like you don't want to own property there. It sounds like the black-market for drugs, in general, has provided a fertile breading ground for violence and mayhem in that area. That's really unfortunate. It's too bad that the illegality of marijuana on a federal level is maintaining the opportunity for the black-market to profit from selling it illegally. Not to burst your bubble Aich, but there isn't anyone here that thinks RE-legalizing marijuana will be a trouble-free, turn-key operation that will instantaneously reverse all of the horrible things that a decades-old black-market has brought about. By RE-legalizing marijuana, parents will be forced to talk to their kids about marijuana much earlier and much more often. The parents that are deadbeat losers now might not magically morph into super-parents when it's RE-legalized but at least they wouldn't get tossed in jail, or fined money they don't have, for buying/growing/using a little pot. However, if marijuana is allowed to remain on the black-market(by keeping it illegal), the problems of a black-market will continue to ravage many parts of the country. If marijuana is taken out of the pool of "drugs" that the black-market can profit from, the black-market would be crippled by it's former-patrons being allowed to keep their money. Who knows, you just might see a property value jump once the scum clears up around your other property Aich. With all of the new industry that will be needed to make the over 25,000 products that can be made with cannabis, many of the worthless drug dealing scum-bags will be afforded the opportunity to obtain gainful employment with-in the new industry. Boy, that sounds horrible, huh Aich? But there will have to be people to process and handle your crop once it comes in, right? Or am I just thinking non-sense? Maybe legalizing marijuana will destroy this nation, but it would be the first time any nation has ever been destroyed by cannabis.

But, you've probably got some atomic logic bomb waiting for us that will make us all see the error of our ways. So please, grace us with your wisdom, oh aichy one.

0

bandmama 4 years, 5 months ago

aich- do you really think that you are they only human in Steamboat who has had an unpleasant experience in a city? I have also lived in a city, I am fully aware of the crimes that occur. Guess what, MY DADDY cant even walk his doggie at night in my hometown anymore without a gun or a weapon due to a major increase in crimes. When I was growing up in that small town, no one locked thier doors and children ran around like children should be able to do. But times change. I could also tell you the story about when I was living in a very large city in the mid west and OH MY GOODNESS!!!! A meth lab was found in the house two doors down from me and mine. AND my kid got to watch men in white suits perform a major clean up! I could then go on to tell you about the teacher in the house right next to mine that was dealing coke out of his gargage while his wife had a daycare inside. Do you wnat to hear some more terrible stories? I dont, nor do I really care to hear any more of yours. If your other home is in such a crime ridden area, get rid of it, or do you feel the need to keep it so you can use terms like "my second home" to all of those that you feel are inferior to your wise ways? And by the way, you are so out of touch with this community. Again your comments about the locals and this community are just outrageous. This is one of the most decent, community oriented towns I have lived in. Most neighbors are just that, neighbors. There is a sense of community that if you were happen to pay attention to how many charitable, giving events take place year round you may notice how many good people are here That is why many of us choose to raise our children in the valley. Yes we may live in a bubble but that is our choice. You raise a few good points about society. But you still fail to see the difference between the use of a drug and the abuse of a substance. Abuse of anything will result in problems.

0

Glenn Little II 4 years, 5 months ago

I just want to give him a taste of freedom.. We are free taxpaying citizens, and need no discrimination.. Not from some sugared up nazi. Mr. aichempty Human-Factors, Manpower, Personnel, & Training or Healthy Marijuana Patients Truth

0

aichempty 4 years, 5 months ago

mmj,

My property back east is well out of the ghetto area, but the local news comes from the middle of it. Just this weekend, there has been a major increase in violent crime and thefts, including theft of aluminum components from fourteen air-conditioning units located at local CHURCHES! Metal recyclers don't have to check an ID for aluminum, but they do for copper, and the copper was left intact.

I don't think the perpetrators were stealing aluminum to pay for drugs. Far from it. I think they were stealing to put food on the table. It was the drugs that put them into a situation where they have no other skills to support themselves. This is what you don't understand. The HUMAN cost is staggering. Legal or illegal, drugs take a terrible toll that spills over into other types of crime. And, as far as expecting parents to "talk" to their kids about drugs, you are out of your tokin' mind. Most of these kids have never had contact with a father, and if the mothers were responsible people the kids would not exist. You just don't understand how it is.

Mama,

There are some wonderful neighbors in Steamboat and Routt County. Just don't expect any of them to stand up for what's right and lawful. Your own stories prove what I'm talking about. It's a town for druggies and tax evaders, and since everybody knows who the cops are, it's not hard to avoid them.

People around here may think they can use recreational drugs responsibly, but the rest of the country cannot. The proof is in the news every day. And it's not the drug trade, but the waste of human lives on drug use that is the problem.

I said I'd vote for pot if it's on the ballot. That's not because I support pot use, and voting for it won't make it legal. I'll just be surprised if you get enough people to vote for it to pass the law. This town is evolving into a wealthy area, and maybe wealthy pot smokers will control it, but as sure as there's a period at the end of this sentence, the kids of working families who tolerate drug abuse will never be able to afford to stay here for the long run. They won't have the skills or the resumes to land jobs paying enough to enable them to stay.

0

mmjPatient22 4 years, 5 months ago

You validate my point with almost everything you say. Black-market marijuana ain't cheap. Believe me, I know. Hell, at this point, the medical marijuana isn't all that cheap either, even if you're buying it from a dispensary. The most efficient, economical way for an individual to provide for their personal medicinal needs is to cultivate it themselves. With demand being the way it is today and with the federal limitations on supply, there are bound to be black-markets that emerge to take care of the demand. Once again, the black-markets emerge to circumvent federal regulations regarding marijuana. However, should it be made legal for the average adult to possess/grow/use their own home-grown marijuana, the leverage that is held by the black-market would cease to exist. The people that are looking for some sort of "relief" or "release" by using/abusing tobacco/coffee/alcohol/cocaine/heroin/crack/meth/speed/other misc drugs, would finally be afforded the option of growing their own safe, effective and economical means of recreation and/or medication. The highly contended issue at hand has nothing to do with the effects that marijuana has on people or their individual ability to abuse it, or any other substance for that matter. Marijuana has been proven to be safer and healthier than alcohol in a recreational capacity. No one is arguing the point that children should have unfettered access to marijuana. We all agree that parents still need to raise their children right and provide for all of their needs. Kids need to be kept away from and educated about the things that could potentially harm them. None of this has anything to do with what is being debated. The main issue is that, somehow, the federal government has been allowed to maintain the current prohibition of marijuana, a naturally occurring PLANT that has qualities, characteristics and potential that are unmatched by any other plant known to mankind. This is where most Americans find the source for their passion on the issue. The kind of logic that was used to initiate the prohibition of marijuana almost a century ago, is in short supply nowadays. The prevailing logic of today is that if you're going to make, or keep, a plant illegal, you'd better have some damn good reasons. There just don't seem to be a whole lot of valid ones around today. The thing that sets cannabis apart from the rest of the junk that it gets looped in with is that it's the only substance listed as having ZERO medicinal value that also has over 25,000 other uses. This is the fact that most Americans cannot reconcile with-in themselves. It just doesn't make any sense aich. But I guess it does to you.

0

aichempty 4 years, 5 months ago

mmj,

No, your points are all valid.

Hey, how about them opium poppies? Aren't they plants, too? And how about Foxglove (the source of digitalis) and peyote (okay, technically a fungus) and oleander (a poisonous plant). I've been working on memorizing the Schedule 1 substances but am not having much luck; just giving thanks that the juniper berry is not on it (whew!).

The problem is not what a responsible adult ought to be able to do. The problem is what irresponsible people do. That's why the rest of us are stuck with restrictions on everything from speed limits, to substances, to needing a pilot's license to fly an airplane, etc. Public safety trumps personal desires. Pot is a public safety issue, like it or not.

0

mmjPatient22 4 years, 5 months ago

What about opium poppy plants? Of coarse they're plants but I don't see how they have a damn thing to do with any of this. Opium poppies are listed as a Schedule 2 narc, whereas marijuana is listed as Schedule 1. Opium poppy plants are legal to grow for food and decorative purposes, whereas marijuana is not. It is not difficult to manufacture opium tea with a high morphine content from poppies readily available at flower shops and, well, if there's a flower shop in America that sells marijuana buds, I'm Harry Anslinger. Foxglove is legal to grow, peyote is protected as a religious sacrament and oleander isn't illegal, a narcotic, or edible(at least not safely). If you add all of that together with your thankfulness for the gin-making juniper berry...you get a bunch of non-sense that doesn't gain you an inch on any front of the debate against RE-legalizing marijuana. If anything, the list of plants you rattled off only serves to point out how ridiculous it is to list marijuana as a Schedule 1 narcotic. And I'm stoked you brought up pot being a public safety issue, because I couldn't agree with you more. If it weren't for marijuana, the number of homicides, suicides, robberies/thefts, assaults and rapes across the nation would skyrocket. I know for a fact that there have been innumerable occasions when me being under the influence of marijuana has kept me from being tossed in jail for beating five shades of s#!+ out of someone. Aside from my somewhat humorous views on public safety in this light, there are serious implications that could impact public safety should marijuana be fully RE-legalized. This isn't something that anyone is arguing either. We all know that driving under the influence is bad and so is speeding. And who the hell would want to fly a plane without absorbing the requisite knowledge for obtaining a license to operate a plane in the air? Those damn restrictions on operating an airplane without a license!!! To quote Peter Griffin, "I find you to be shallow and pedantic." You're efforts at establishing grounds for the support of the current marijuana prohibition are laughable, at best. But if you feel the need to keep on trying, go right on ahead. Just know that you're not really getting through to a soul.

0

aichempty 4 years, 5 months ago

mmj,

I'm not trying to establish grounds for anything. I'm only taking the Devil's advocate position because you and others who want pot legalized for general use have to convince everybody else that it's a good idea. I'm one vote. One vote will never decide the issue.

It's going to take a huge swing in public opinion among mature, responsible adults before pot can be legalized. People in their teens and twenties are not equipped to make responsible decisions, and like it or not, your admission that you would resort to violence if you were not medicated doesn't support a case for legalization of drugs for the general public.

Risky behavior takes its toll on the human population. Some people can take one pill, on schedule, for pain relief and never become addicted or abusive. Others can't resist the urge to take the same pill just to get high. Those are the ones who cannot be trusted to act responsibly.

The AIDS epidemic resulted in a situation where, about fifteen years ago, 90% of the patient population in inner-city Baltimore was HIV positive. One has to presume that marijuana was freely available to the same people, but they used IV drugs and shared needles and had unprotected heterosexual sex to the point that depopulation of the area was a real possibility. Legal alcohol was also cheap and available. If you think that legal pot would have prevented those things from happening, I think you're being very naive about how things really happen in this world.

There's this old thing called "sending a message." Legalizing drugs that are currently considered contraband because of their abuse would clearly send "the wrong message" to people who might be on the fence. It would also result in a lot of elected representatives at the state and federal level losing their jobs.

You have a very "me colored glasses" view of the controversy, and the fact that pot works for you (according to you) does not mean that it's a good idea for anyone else. If you hope to change the laws, you're going to have to come up with an argument that will make the middle-aged working class parents of teenagers in drug-plagued neighborhoods agree with you. Failing that, you're going to need a Supreme Court decision that declares the placement of marijuana on schedule 1 of the Controlled Substances Act unconstitutional.

FYI, back in the day, no license was required to drive a car or fly an airplane. Licenses were not required until people started dying and taking innocent passengers and bystanders with them. Public safety is the issue, and when it comes to pot, you're going to have to come up with a compelling public safety argument in its favor to get anything changed.

Frankly, any position remotely like, "Smoking pot prevents rape," is not going to get you very far.

0

mmjPatient22 4 years, 5 months ago

So let me get this straight....you're just being argumentative for the sake of playing "the Devil's advocate" on the issue? Do you even really believe half of the crap that falls out of your mouth or do you just ramble for the pleasure you derive from being part of something confrontational? And I don't need to convince anyone of anything. The evidence speaks for itself. Marijuana is safer than alcohol. Why not give people a safer recreational option besides alcohol? No one is saying that we should legalize it and let all hell break loose. Of coarse there has to be rules/laws/regulations regarding the usage of marijuana but there is no reason to keep it fully illegal for use by the general population. You don't have any reasons other than the imaginative scenes that play out in the fantasy land of your mind. I would think that the number of states that have legalized the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes over the past 10-15 years would be enough indication of the pole shift that is happening to the majority view of cannabis. Things are steadily progressing towards general RE-legalization of cannabis whether I convince anyone or not. You obviously chose to overlook the part of my last comment where I alluded to the humor I was utilizing towards public safety. I did not say that I would resort to violence should I somehow become un-medicated. You love to twist words though, so whatever. Legalizing pot will not stop our national rape-o-meter, death-o-meter or assault-o-meter. The point I was making is that those who use marijuana in a recreational capacity, as opposed to alcohol, are almost infinitely less-likely to be involved in the commission of an act of violence. This can be verified by anyone that has ever used marijuana. The stories like those portrayed in "Reefer Madness" are pure fantasy, to put it lightly.

0

trump_suit 4 years, 5 months ago

Breckenridge, CO Marajuana legalization vote passed with over 70% Yes. Sounds to me like public opinion among mature, responsible adults is already swaying.

0

Glenn Little II 4 years, 5 months ago

Even in this discussion the public opinion takes the vote. I don't see much opposition about the legalization of marijuana besides aichempty and maybe a handfull of others. The re-legalization of cannabis has slim to none for the number of people voting against it. Alchohol destroys everything around us.. LEGALIZE IT !!

0

aichempty 4 years, 5 months ago

Breckenridge cannot, by federal law, legalize pot. Get over it. It's an empty gesture and a moot point. Marijuana is illegal under federal law, and until the Department of Justice takes the same stance as with medical marijuana, or Congress repeals the Controlled Substances Act, nothing has changed.

Breckenridge and Steamboat are microcosms of a liberal society which does not control a majority throughout the country.

So, mmj, back to you -- in order to legalize marijuana, you are going to have to convince enough voters to vote for it nationwide to make a difference. The other issues are interesting, but they don't mean a thing in terms of what's legal and what's not.

You may have run across a religious group which claims that only 144,000 people are going to heaven, and in order to get into the group they are required to go door to door spreading the message. I compare the pro-marijuana group to them because no matter how much you believe something, unless you can get everybody else to go along with you, nothing changes.

So, yeah, you DO need to convince enough voters to agree with you to legalize pot for the general public. That's the bottom line truth. Alcohol vs. marijuana means nothing in any discussion without the votes to back it up in a national referendum or a constitutional amendment. So get crackin'.

0

mmjPatient22 4 years, 5 months ago

Well aich, there appear to be at least 14 states where there are enough voters to pass legislation that legalizes cannabis in a medicinal capacity. If I were a betting man, I'd venture a guess that there wouldn't be too many of those states where a general legalization ballot issue would fail to gather enough of the the same voters that got it legalized for medicinal purposes initially. And that's just the votes from those 14 states. If you factor in the potential votes from the other 14 states that are currently deciding the medical marijuana issue, there could be a scary huge number of voters that would give it two-thumbs-up. I think that fear is setting in for those who oppose the RE-legalization of marijuana. When the prohibition of marijuana began in 1937, things were a bit different in our world. Petroleum seemed to fall from the sky like manna, the industrial revolution was still taking hold of our society and Hitler was just beginning to reverse the Treaty of Versailles by rebuilding his armies and moving his troops into the Rhineland. The general public's opinion of marijuana, as laid-out in every piece of US government sponsored propaganda, was that it was brought in by the Mexicans and when these Mexicans got all hyped up on the reefer....boy you better lock up your women and horses because they're going to rape everything in sight, right before they kill it. This is obviously a creation of pure fantasy and imagination but it worked at the time. The thing that's different about the day and age we live in now, or at least what I'd hope for, is that there aren't enough idiots in America that would be dumb enough to believe crap like that anymore. Ironically, the Mexicans are still involved in the debate about RE-legalization today. The Mexican drug cartels and illegal immigration are running a train on America along our entire Southern boarder and the one thing that could send most of them packing, is illegal.

0

aichempty 4 years, 5 months ago

Cracking down on illegal employment of non-resident aliens would send a lot more of them packing.

In order to get marijuana legalized for the general public, it's going to take 50 years for the attitudes to change. If that happened today, the United States would be only one of THREE countries which authorize it for lawful use by adults. Maybe after another 100 countries legalize it, including Canada and Mexico, we'll have no choice.

So don't hold your breath.

0

mmjPatient22 4 years, 5 months ago

Aich, I don't have to hold my breath for anything other than a dose of medication. The general public's views are shifting and they're shifting at a record rate, if you consider the time line of over 70 years of the current marijuana prohibition. The illegal immigration issue is something that is mostly a side issue and it is not directly connected to the issue of RE-legalizing marijuana. The main Mexican issue around marijuana is the cartels. By taking away one of their most profitable products we would be crippling their ability to thrive in our country. Not only would the cartels have their marijuana crutch taken away from them but the customer base that pursues their other products would have a safer, legal alternative. The cartels wouldn't be the only ones to take a big hit from the federal government changing it's stance on marijuana for the general public. America's seemingly sacred pharmaceutical companies would feel the hurt from a blow like that too. And let's face it, it's not like they're hurting for money right now.

0

Requires free registration

Posting comments requires a free account and verification.