Steamboat 700 consultant Peter Patten, from left, goes over the planned development with planning commission members Karen Dixon and Sarah Fox on Monday while touring the site in west Steamboat Springs. On Thursday, the Steamboat Springs Planning Commission will provide feedback to developers about the annexation proposal.

Photo by John F. Russell

Steamboat 700 consultant Peter Patten, from left, goes over the planned development with planning commission members Karen Dixon and Sarah Fox on Monday while touring the site in west Steamboat Springs. On Thursday, the Steamboat Springs Planning Commission will provide feedback to developers about the annexation proposal.

Various Steamboat 700 components under consideration

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Click here to download Steamboat 700 planning documents.

If you go

What: Steamboat Springs Planning Commission meeting

When: 6 p.m. Thursday

Where: Centennial Hall, 124 10th St.

Call: City planning offices at 871-8258 for more information

— As the city approaches a decision about whether to annex Steamboat 700, its review of the project is moving from the conceptual to the detailed.

"With the City Council right now, there's multiple components going on at the same time," Steamboat Springs City Manager Jon Roberts said Monday. "Right now, the one that's getting the most focus is the fiscal impact model."

The city and Steamboat 700 are modeling the financial implications of the development in terms of operating expenses and capital projects. Roberts said Steamboat 700 is close to revenue neutrality on the operating side. The city has had less time to review Steamboat 700's capital plan, Roberts said.

Steamboat 700 got a boost on the operating front last week when Steamboat Springs City Council decided to support the developers' position on how the costs of a new west-side fire station should be allocated. Rather than chalking up 100 percent of the station's costs to development in Steamboat 700, council members agreed to calculate the need for the station generated by Steamboat 700 on a pro rata basis.

"Based upon that, there's some modeling and analysis being done on what is their pro rata share," Roberts said.

The fiscal impact model shows Steamboat 700 becoming revenue-positive at different stages depending on its absorption rate. City Council President Loui Antonucci said last week that the council is concerned about Steamboat 700's first few years, when the development probably will be a drain on city finances.

He said he doesn't think the city has enough spare cash to bridge the gap.

"The focal point is going to be the first three to four years," Antonucci said.

On Thursday, Steamboat Springs Planning Commission will provide feedback to the developers about components of the annexation proposal including its proposed land-use plan, community housing plan and sustainability plan.

"We are looking for recommendations : on any revisions that need to be made : that you feel are necessary for this to be ready for approval," Planning Services Manager John Eastman said at a Planning Commission work session Monday.

Planning and Community Development Director Tom Leeson said the next time planning commissioners see Steamboat 700, it will be to consider the development's final plans for annexation.

Also at the meeting, planning commissioners said they hope to see more details. For example, Steamboat 700's sustainability plan includes proposals for a ride share program, minimized overlot grading, energy efficiency, water conservation, green building practices and more, but it does not provide specifics for how all of the programs will be implemented.

In a letter to the city, Steamboat 700 consultant Peter Patten wrote that there are too many unresolved factors that will play into whether some of the goals can be achieved and how.

Steamboat 700's land-use plan has shrunk for the second time and now includes 2,000 homes on 487 acres. It previously was reduced from 700 acres to 508 when the developers failed in a bid to extend the urban growth boundary. Project Manager Danny Mulcahy said the latest reduction in the scope of the project was made because of infrastructure and skyline concerns.

A decision to annex is tentatively scheduled for September, although Mulcahy said he plans to push for a decision this summer, which is when the decision was originally scheduled to be made.

Comments

beentheredonethat 5 years, 7 months ago

Louie, to avoid a repeat of the disastrous financial beating you imposed on Steamboat with the airport, you had better look farther down the road then just the first 3-4 years. Steamboat 700 will be with us for generations to come, so try to get it right this time!

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