Tubers dot the Yampa River through downtown Steamboat Springs on a Saturday afternoon in July 2007. As tubing season nears in 2009, members of the Respect the Yampa campaign are reminding river users to reduce their impact on wildlife habitat on the river.

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Tubers dot the Yampa River through downtown Steamboat Springs on a Saturday afternoon in July 2007. As tubing season nears in 2009, members of the Respect the Yampa campaign are reminding river users to reduce their impact on wildlife habitat on the river.

River respect encouraged

Tubers asked to follow management plan

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Parking locations for tubing the Yampa River

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For questions about tubing regulations and suggestions, call the Steamboat Springs Parks, Open Space and Recreational Services Department at 879-4300.

— If you sit long enough by the edge of the Yampa River, you can see the season changing. Not by the colors of the leaves or the temperature of the air, but by the occasional tube intermixed with the kayaks and rafts that can be seen floating down the high water.

It's almost officially tubing season, and as the water nears the perfect level for leisurely floating, community and government groups again are reminding tubers of the regulations and urging them to be considerate of other river users.

Tubers are discouraged from putting in upstream of Fetcher Park, partly to respect the anglers' designated area, but mostly to reduce the impact tubers have on wildlife habitat through trash left in the river.

"Litter, to me, is the overwhelming detriment to the river, and the things that encourage litter are alcohol use, and people going down the river and they don't really know any better," said Peter Van De Carr, owner of Backdoor Sports and member of the Respect the Yampa campaign. "They don't know you can't take litter on the river because chances are very good you're going to get upset, and you're going to get dumped over" and spill trash.

Van De Carr and the campaign members are distributing fliers to sellers of tubes in an attempt to urge tubers to follow river regulations.

City Open Space Supervisor Craig Robinson said many of the regulations are not yet laws, after the Colorado Division of Wildlife's proposal to implement increased legal regulation was rebuffed earlier this year in favor of the 2004 Yampa River Management Plan.

"No alcohol is actually a law, but other things are respecting other users, which should be common sense, but we're hearing from other users that we're not at that level yet. That's the level we're reaching for," he said.

The 2004 plan calls for no tubing access upstream of Fetcher Park, and no access at River Creek Park or Rotary Park.

Tubers may park vehicles in the limited spaces at Fetcher Park to put in downstream or at Howelsen Hill near the rodeo grounds. For pick-up, tubers are encouraged to park at the Stock Bridge Transit Center.

"The reality is the downstream stretch, from Fetcher down or Fifth Street down, is a much more exciting, more accessible stretch," Van De Carr said.

- To reach Zach Fridell, call 871-4208 or e-mail zfridell@steamboatpilot.com

Comments

localboy17 5 years, 6 months ago

Ridiculous. Let's make really sad faces, maybe try to work up some tears, and use puffy lips to whine at tourists to please respect the river and try to refrain from drinking and littering THE LIVING HELL out of our beloved river. You honestly think tourists are going to give any thought what so ever to a river that isn't in their home town. Laws and regulations are the only thing that will have any effect on the vast amount of trash and cans and clothes left all around the river last summer. It was disgusting and just the mere fact that we are too much of a sissy town to make any regulations or laws simply shows that we truly do not even respect our own river. Let's just sit back and worry about stepping on toes and how we are going to pay for it, instead of actually taking care of one of the true assets of this town and paying for it later.

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flotilla 5 years, 6 months ago

I think a lot of the disrespect comes from local kids, much like the disrespect we see on the mountain on "gaper day" etc. it most likely won't work and we'll see tubing be only commercial. I really don't think the majority of disrespect is coming from tourism. Those are usually the folks that rent the tubes and they definitely leave trash but they usually aren't the drunk kids spilling empty beer cans everywhere.

I do agree that the only way to fix it is through laws. Extremely sad.

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papafu 5 years, 6 months ago

Will there be signs at River Creek Park and Rotary Park letting people know that there is no tubing access?

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Tubes 5 years, 6 months ago

are we really "encouraging" people to respect the river? respect for the river should go without saying. "...they don't really know any better..." c'mon, seriously....they know better! and you're not gonna get through to them with this great article! as long as there is tubing, there will be trash. count on it.

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