Cash questions continue

City Council insists Steamboat 700 developers assume all risk

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Steamboat 700 by the numbers

Total size: 508 acres

Open space and parks: 147 acres

Development area: 361 acres

Start of infrastructure construction: 2010

Start of homebuilding: 2011

Build-out: 20 years

Housing units: 2,044*

Commercial uses: 340,000 square feet*

Community housing units: 511**

Real estate transfer fee: 1 percent***

* Under a large-format retail alternative land-use plan, the number of housing units would be reduced to 1,818 and one of three mixed-use "village centers" would be replaced with a 348,000-square-foot retail center with space for two large-format retailers and a grocery store.

** Number includes a mix of for-sale and rental housing options for households earning between 70 percent and 160 percent of the area median income.

*** Initial sales and community housing units excluded. The transfer fee would be dedicated to community enhancements and housing affordability, and a specified amount would be earmarked to provide a permanent funding source for the Yampa Valley Housing Authority.

Source: Steamboat 700

— Risk aversion was on everyone's mind Tuesday night as City Council and Steamboat 700 developers resumed their slow dance toward annexation.

At the end of the evening, council members left little doubt about who could be left holding the bag. If a fiscal stew of property taxes, real estate transfer fees, interest rates and housing absorption rates fails to produce enough revenue to fund $70 million to $80 million of community capital improvements in the project west of Steamboat, the developers will be on the hook.

"We choose not to put the city of Steamboat Springs in a position of assuming risk," Council President Loui Antonucci said. "We can talk about that, but I don't think our position is going to change."

He made the remarks as Steamboat 700 representatives debuted a financial plan they say would generate sufficient revenue to raise $48 million for public improvements in the next 35 years. Financial consultant Jean Townsend told council that $48 million is the share her clients think they should contribute to $70.8 million in infrastructure needs, ranging from sidewalks to fire trucks, in neighborhoods where they hope to build as many as 2,000 homes. The site is north of U.S. Highway 40 and just west of the existing city limits.

The balance of the money could come from state and federal highway funds, other developments being considered for annexation - such as 360 Village - and the city.

Elements of Steamboat 700's financing proposal for capital costs are so new, city staff has not had time to analyze them and report to council. Accordingly, council members were hesitant to discuss their merits.

Townsend said her clients are willing to provide more than $8 million in cash for priority projects soon after Steamboat 700 wins an annexation agreement. That amount includes $5.5 million for U.S. 40 improvements they say would include rebuilding the intersection at Elk River Road. The money would become available, Townsend said, as soon as the initial final plat for the development is filed.

Also within 60 days of annexation, they would contribute $100,000 for the city's water rights enhancement fund. And when the city and Steamboat Springs Rural Fire Protection District are ready to finance a new fire station in west Steamboat, Steamboat 700 would come through with almost $2.7 million for that project.

But the developers also are asking for some concessions.

They want to be excused from contributing $3 million to $14.5 million to help solve the 13th Street bottleneck, a problem they say pre-dated their development proposal. Nor do they want to be compelled to put up $8.9 million for a new public safety building, a need they say was formally documented by a city study in 2001. They also want to be credited for between $20 million and $28.8 million in use and excise tax revenues they say construction of the new neighborhood will contribute to city coffers.

What ifs

Council members expressed concern with long-term figures.

Steamboat 700 proposes to levy five mills of property tax within its metro district and collect a 0.2 percent real estate transfer fee to pay for its remaining $48.7 million share, or 69 percent, of capital improvements. Townsend said it would take 35 years for those revenues streams to cover the big number.

Councilman Jon Quinn said there is no way for city government to know with certainty whether all of the financial variables that affect those revenue generators will actually cover the figure.

"The proposal has a great many assumptions in it - absorption rates, interest rates, inflation - if we accept a financial model, the city accepts the risks. What happens if the revenues run short?" Quinn asked.

Townsend hesitated to say Steamboat 700 would cover any and all shortfalls and Councilwoman Cari Hermacinski countered.

"This is a collaborative partnership. But how can the city turn around and accept that risk?" Hermacinski asked. "The fact remains that you guys are the entrepreneurs. If there's a shortfall, it's going to have to be absorbed by Steamboat 700."

Public speaks out

Previous public hearings concerning the proposed annexation of Steamboat 700 have been lightly attended. However, 45 people, two former City Council presidents among them, came prepared to speak Tuesday night.

- Bill Jameson argued that residents of 2,000 new homes someday could swamp existing city recreational facilities such as swimming pools and Howelsen Ice Arena.

"Require a rec center," Jameson urged. "If you don't, I want to know what you expect the people to do. You've got a real problem."

- Former City Council President Ken Brenner: "I can't find a wastewater treatment facility (in the list of capital improvements). Rifle has experienced growth from energy and had to expand its sewage plant. The cost was $23 million. That's an enormous cost I don't see addressed in here."

- Bill Moser asked, "Have you ever considered putting this before the residents in the form of a referendum? Because this is a major change of lifestyle of everyone in own and affects everyone - where you work, where you play." Antonucci replied that City Council decided not to take an annexation question to voters because the West of Steamboat Springs Area Plan was the subject of many public hearings.

- Steve Lewis asked, "If we start a petition drive to put it on the ballot, will the developer then have a chance to make changes to the plan?" City Attorney Tony Lettunich said the answer to that is "no." The annexation would be ratified by an ordinance. Any ballot question would be worded to simply uphold or overturn the ordinance. Hermacinski reminded Lewis that the developers have voluntarily agreed that they would live with the state's petition threshold of signatures equivalent to 10 percent of the electorate rather than the city's 20 percent requirement.

Comments

sickofitall 4 years, 10 months ago

Lets make this easy on City Council and put it to vote!!

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goremtn 4 years, 10 months ago

"Require a rec center." Um, didn't we all reject that rec center idea 2 years ago, it lost 20-80 at the ballot box? That's pretty clear signal we didn't want one....oh wait, that meant we want one, just that we don't want to PAY for it...we want a FREE one and a free new water treatment plant and a free new police station and free fixes to the 40 and and and....Let's be reasonable here people. The plans got to work and not leave residents in the lurch, but 700 and the 360 are not santa claus either.

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beentheredonethat 4 years, 10 months ago

"The fact remains that you guys are the entrepreneurs. If there's a shortfall, it's going to have to be absorbed by Steamboat 700."

...and that is precisely the way it should be.

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sickofitall 4 years, 10 months ago

Goremtn...That rec center was going to cost somewhere around 70 million dollars. Then we would need to pay to use it. I would of been in favor of a smaller project. We don't NEED all the bells and whistles. Watch, try to retire here in 20 years and you will be driven out of town by property taxes.

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stillinsteamboat 4 years, 10 months ago

Las Vegas 700, umm, I mean Steamboat 700 is trying to pull a fast one. Don't take the bait.

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Tubes 4 years, 10 months ago

i got your rec center. it's called steamboat. two ski mtn's, one of the top nordic facilities in the world, endless hiking and biking trails with not so bad views, world class fishing, 4 golf courses, sweet tennis facility, a well done core trail, killer kayak and rafting rapids, all kinds of camping in areas that don't exactly suck, sick long boarding roads--just stay in your lane, gnarly tubing--stay off of public property, plenty of county roads to don your cycling tights and ride 4 abreast, and a bunch of intramural sports and activities, etc.

and i'm sure i missed a few recreational opportunities...we need a rec center about as bad as we need more rain.

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goremtn 4 years, 10 months ago

sickofitall: Acutally, looked it up and the rec center's cost was $34 million (not $70 million)--granted, expensive--and # does not including the ongoing operational costs. At any rate, I think this is example of an attitude in our community (and honestly in the entire US) that we all expect everything but we expect somebody else to pay for all of it. In this example, "we" want a new fire station, a new police station, a new school, a new rec center, a new water treatment plant, affordable housing, pedestrian underpasses, fixing US 40 including 13th Street. . .what are we trying to say? "hey entrepreneurs, come build the community we told you we want and need but first here's the ginormous pile of costs we want you to take care of 100% and take 100% of the risk. Or we will shut your business down." As an entrepreneur myself. . .lemme just say that entrepreneurship is not the right concept here given all the public sector demands, and this sounds contrary to "collaboration" or "partnership" coming from the city.

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justice4all 4 years, 10 months ago

Does not take an intelligent person to see that Steamboat is building itself into disaster. O K. We get these 2000 plus homes built, sold and then occupied. Where are the people going to work? With no jobs in our valley, how are they going to support their homes and families? Do we want industry in our county? I think not! People come here because they like it the way it is (OR WAS). If they want to change our county let's not welcome them and even send them home or on their way to an area that already has what they want. If they love it the way it is, let's welcome them. Bottom line---- LEAVE OUR COUNTY ALONE OR LEAVE OUR COUNTY!!!!

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Fred Duckels 4 years, 10 months ago

Everytime we have a proposed project,the community alliance is front and center,demanding that the developer give up so much,that the project is no longer viable. In this case they should have reared their head years ago when all this planning was in the mill. Their MO is right on schedule,flooding public meetings with "concerned citizens" swaying the votes of elected officials with the show of force. I personally don't care for growth but if there is a buck to be made someone will make it. If this is not acceptable then we need to change the laws, until then developers are entitled to fair treatment just as we all are. After all the gnashing and grinding of teeth, by the community alliance, on the subject of affordable housing,one would think that the 700 project would be an answered prayer. Lately this valley seems addicted to the free ride in the form of grants, extortion from developers, gravel pits, or anyone wishing to make improvements. When the 700 project came on the scene it seemed to be a social engineers dream come true,but it is not possible to let every citizen be the judge and jury. We must present ourselves as something above a "good old boy's club"

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Fred Duckels 4 years, 10 months ago

No matter how much we squeeze the 700 project, the end result will be passed on and it will end up as a tax on the community. This allows the leaders to stand up and demand from 700, concessions that they can hold up as trophys, when in reality they are imposing more taxes. No free ride!

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Steve Lewis 4 years, 10 months ago

Risk? Council has it so right - the city cannot take on the potential future funding shortfalls. 700 is talking 35 years of financing?

I do sympathize with the investors behind 700. The land use plans on paper are really good. But we now have a large inventory of residential units for sale, and absorption rates are going to be low for awhile. The math looks bad.

My concern is that the short term profit of their investment is becoming more and more reliant on the infrastucture and service costs (mil levy taxes) they will hand off to future 700 residents.

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beentheredonethat 4 years, 10 months ago

where are all the buyers for the proposed expensive but very tiny "monopoly houses" going to come from?

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Fred Duckels 4 years, 10 months ago

If we turn this project down we will essentially stop development, who can ever meet the demands? If this is the path that we choose we might as well terminate the beaurecrats that deal with such matters. For the novices, the economy is not your concern, this is always the tool of naysayers.

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jk 4 years, 10 months ago

beenthere, I think they are all of the people who are not buying up the condo inventory, because they prefer to shovel their own walks, plow their own driveways, and mow their own grass. I'm sure there is a line of about 2,000 of 'em just over the pass somewhere.

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justice4all 4 years, 10 months ago

And let them stay "over the pass" somewhere. You may think twice when these "NEW COMERS" take your job or you kids job and then you can not find a job or support your family and home. Again, I say, where are they going to work? Please do not let anyone ruin our valley any more than it has been ruined just to satisfy their financial greed. I challenge you to find me 10 families that have been here 10 years that think that our valley has been improved by developement. And, I will find you 100 that say it has not. Actually, I feel that they will come forth voluntarily.

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jk 4 years, 10 months ago

justice, I am with you on this. It is Fred who believes in the old Field of Dreams "If you build it they will come".

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vanguy 4 years, 10 months ago

Justice....here is a quick recap of all the terrible development that has has negatively impacted our community over the past 10 +/- years:

  • Bud Werner Library
  • Yampa Valley Med Center
  • Howelsen Ice Arena
  • SSWSC Training Facilities and our Year Round Ski Jumping Facility
  • Soda Creek Elementary School
  • How many new playgrounds?
  • Expanded Trail Network on Emerald Mountain
  • Old Town Hot Springs Improvements
  • HDN Airport Expansion
  • Haymaker Golf Course
  • 2 New Ski Lifts and New Terrain
  • Yampa Core Bike Path + numerous expansions
  • Community Center
  • Strings Pavilion
  • Excel Gymnastics Center
  • Ghost Ranch Saloon
  • Boat House Pub
  • Ace at the Curve
  • Cujinos
  • Young Tracks Child Care Center

If you think these things haven't improved our community, I suggest you and your family go live somewhere else.

Steamboat 700 developers could turn their land into a high-end development featuring 35 acre "luxury estate" homesites pratically overnight, with no further involvement of city council. By abandoning the annexation process, only county planning and commissioners would have any say in the matter. Furthermore, ALL building materials in this scenario would be exempt from city sales tax, which would cost the city millions and millions and millions....

While I'm not crazy about 2000 homes being built on the west side of town, we as a community must be careful what we wish for. Both sides of the sword are quite sharp.

Kudos for both Danny Mulcahy and City Council for the time, energy, and money both parties have invested thus far. There is much more collaberation and partnership than the Pilot or the Bloggers would lead us to believe...

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addlip2U 4 years, 10 months ago

Greed! That is what the developers are after while courting our pro-development city council members. 700 is not the type of a growth or progress suitable to a community that lacks year around employment.
We will all be suffering from congestion, lack of infrastructure and basic services, over taxation while the developer moves on to pray onto another victim/city to fill their pockets. SS residents deserve to have a vote!

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Scott Ford 4 years, 10 months ago

When thinking about the economy and where these folks may work or find jobs, we need to see beyond what we can see with our eyes. For about 6 years the local economic diversity has been driven by folks that do not earn their living within the confines of the Yampa Valley.

If one could do their business from anywhere why not here? My office partner is a micro chip designer down the street is a person that designs computer competency testing programs for school districts across the country and my neighbor across the street is a program engineer for Sun Micro Systems. All they need to do business here is a high speed Internet connection, cell phone coverage and reasonable access to air transportation.

For three years in a row the net income migration of those coming in and those moving out has exceeded $25 million. They do not take anybody's job or compete locally for jobs they simply brought their reasonably well paying job with them. They are not second home owners or part-time residents they are full time residents. They are our neighbors.

To put this $25 million of new imported annual wage/salary income in perspective it is approximately equal to a third of all the wage/salary income generated from Retail Trade in Routt County. It has been at this $25 million level (give or take a few million dollars) for three years in a row. Add the early/active retires to this equation and the amount of new dollars annual income coming into Routt County could easily be $40 million. Will this migration income be lower in 2009? Without question it will be. However, the trend this group represent will continue unless we figure out a way to unplug the Internet and stop air service.

If an individual is looking for a mountain lifestyle with abundant recreation opportunities, then the Steamboat Springs area is a pretty sweet place. Face it it's better than living in Cleveland or Detroit if you have the choice.

Talk to any realtor in town and they will tell you that this group which is a part of what I call the Residential/Lifestyle Economy is one of their important customer segments. Will these folks fill-up Steamboat 700? No way, but some of them will live there because they want to and the pricing and proximity to town will make it attractive to them.

BTW Well said VanGuy.

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ybul 4 years, 10 months ago

-Steamboat 700 developers could turn their land into a high-end development featuring 35 acre "luxury estate" homesites pratically overnight, with no further involvement of city council.-

Those 35 acre ranch subdivisions are doing so well right now. I do not think that is a financially viable option in the near/long term. So that leaves the investors scrambling to figure out how to make there project work in a much changed environment from when they started.

Might just not work out, with a 35 year time line, there is no reasonable way the city should take the risks being presented.

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sickofitall 4 years, 10 months ago

Goremtn.. The rec center was 34 million, but, the city was going to need to borrow the money, so with the interest it equalled around 60 million to 70 million.

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sickofitall 4 years, 10 months ago

Part of the problem is we are overstocked with real estate right now. There is no need for additional homes. Mortgages are back to being reasonable, the housing bubble burst (we all knew it would), and now Council needs to fund a bad budget. Steamboat just went through some major transformations for better or worse. I cant say Ill miss Old lady Liquors. I think its time to take a step back and let the new developments "catch up". Seriously, just take a break. We have room to fill and we could always annex land. Fact of the matter is, the community winds up paying for maintenance on new developments. If we are in such a pickle now, wait till we have to pay for all the maintenance on SB 700. My property taxes have more than doubled in the last 5 years. In another 5 years I hope I can simply afford them.

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Scott Ford 4 years, 10 months ago

I am sure that subdividing this land into 35 luxury estates is one of the fallback options that have to exist for Steamboat 700 as an exit strategy. If they go this route it is more likely that they will work closely with the County to do a LPS (Land Preservation Subdivision). More than likely we would see between 25 and 35 clustered 3 to 5 acre estates depending on the density bonus the County would grant them.

If this approach is taken it would essentially stop growth west of town. It is my understanding that state law requires that annexations must be contiguous with existing land parcels within the city limits. I think this would mean that Village 360 would be dead as well. Trying to take a long term view (50 years from now) of what is in the best interest of the community? This is a tough one to answer.

I think we will eventually see Steamboat 700 and SBS City Council come to an agreement they both can live with. I think it is highly likely that City Council will pass annexation ordnance sometime this summer. It is my understanding that those opposed to the annexation ordnance have 30 days to circulate a petition from the date of adoption requesting that the citizens of Steamboat Springs be able to vote to accept or reject the annexation ordnance.

I am sure that the issue will make it to the ballot with a signature threshold of 10% of the electorate. Will it be a special election or will it be a part of the City's November ballot? I think it would be in Steamboat 700's best interest if it were a part of the November ballot. Agree?

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steamboatsprings 4 years, 10 months ago

Excellent comments Scott. However we feel about Steamboat 700 it now has little chance of being that affordable given all of the internal and external infrastructure it needs to fund. It wasn't this council that put together the West Of Steamboat Plan they just get to try to figure out how to make sense of it. We are fortunate that they have the business sense to properly evaluate it.

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Fred Duckels 4 years, 10 months ago

Scott, This is a poor time to be bringing up everyones concerns, and put this to a vote. We can't lead the developer for years and then move the goal posts. To do this now would certainly brand us as the hicks that we will be. If all the extra demands are now necessary, we should have been up front from the start. Buyers remorse?

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justice4all 4 years, 10 months ago

vanguy Sorry I took so long to respond to your post. You are right. The long list that you provided lists many new things in our town. Question: Without all the "new growth" in our town, Would these things be needed? I think not. The previous post contains a number of jobs that are performed here from the people's homes. Do you honestly think that 2000 plus new homeowners could have that type of employment? Maybe 5% ? What % of our present neighbors have such employment now? The majority of our neighbors are "working class" people like me. Do we really need 2000 more homes occupied by people that will compete for our jobs? Just like prisons, "build them and they will be occupied". I still stand by my statement. Leave our town alone or leave our town!

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stillinsteamboat 4 years, 10 months ago

If it involves Backhoes and digging, Fred is all over it!!

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Matthew Stoddard 4 years, 10 months ago

Scott- very well put. I, and many others from the look, didn't see that by not being annexed, it will basically put the West Steamboat Plan back for a full overhaul. Many years of work down the drain in an instant.

I personally have no problem with 700 going in. While the job market is down now, 2 years ago there were complaints about all the H2B's and J2 workers being imported. That was due to the fact that none of the positions they filled were being fill by locals. That day will come again. If the costs can be kept down in the 700 area, that means families that will join the workforce might be able to afford to live there. If not, when the time comes, we'll all be singing the H2B/J2 boogie again. I can't say that's a bad thing, either. The people who worked for me this winter were mostly H2B's and they were great!

And I find one more thread where I agree with Fred! Woooo!

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addlip2U 4 years, 10 months ago

H2B/J2 are transitional employees filling SEASONAL position(s). They only occupy employee housing or live packed in cheap rental units. However, those purchasing homes in 700 will need year round employment and more than one job especially if paid the current hospitality industry pay rate.

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Matthew Stoddard 4 years, 10 months ago

addlip2U- This is true, but some of these families will still have young ones needing those jobs, or are "retired" but looking to work part-time to pay the monthly bills where they don't need year-round work. And I live on the current hospitality pay rate in Silver Spur. I was lucky to get in when it wasn't as expensive to buy. Maybe this housing can stay low enough priced so these types of families can afford to buy and live here.

Some of these families might even start their own businesses that might need year-round employees, if someone opens something that might even be able to thrive in the Spring and Fall. There's a lot of open (and more to come) retail space available. This might help fill some space. At the very least, this influx of homes could mean that more people are here in the Spring & Fall, prompting a need for businesses to stay open & keep help during that time period. Hey! We just possibly created jobs right here in Steamboat in this economy! Maybe this will bring a real need for a west-side supermarket/Super-Target style business that can thrive. Plus, as the people quoted at the meeting said, a new firehouse, wastewater plant...new jobs to build them, new jobs to fill them. Could happen.

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Scott Ford 4 years, 10 months ago

Fred Based on what I heard Council Woman Cari Hermacinski say Tuesday night, and the statement was confirmed by the City Attorney, Tony Lettunich, once City Council votes to approve the annexation ordnance any citizen group would have 30 days to submit a petition requesting an "up" or "down" vote on the ordnance.

The big change here is that the City Charter indicates that it takes 20% of the electorate to sign a petition to put a question on the ballot. The state constitution, regarding city ballot questions states only 10% of the electorate is necessary. It is my understanding that Tony Lettunich has advised City Council that the 20% requirement in the Steamboat Springs City Charter is likely unconstitutional. It is also my understanding that both City Council and the annexation applicant (Steamboat 700) have agreed to the 10% of the electorate threshold.

I am not too sure how many signatures will be required but I am sure that it is going to be a number sort of 1,000. That number would be a sufficient margin to cover invalid signatures. Given 30 days the folks that want to put this to a vote can easily get that number of signatures by standing outside City Market, Safeway and the two Post Offices. (Agreed?)

Let us be clear that signing the petition does not mean one supports or does not support the annexation. All signing the petition means is that a citizen is in support of putting the question regarding the annexation ordnance to a vote. Fred, you know this community as well if not better than I do, what you think a local citizen will choose to do if given the option? Unless I am not reading the community tea leaves correctly there will be a vote. It is a giant pain in the backside, however, it is a part of the political process and it needs to run its course.

Asuming that there is a vote, the next key question would it be a special election or a part of the November ballot? I think having the question as a part of the November ballot works in favor of having the annexation ordnance upheld. I think if a special election is held the vote will be in favor of overturning the annexation ordnance.

All I know for sure is that if this goes to a vote the two newspapers in town will sell a lot of ads and a lot of editorial ink will be devoted to the question.

If your (or other blog participants) perspective is/are different - I welcome reading it.

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jk 4 years, 10 months ago

Mathew. there are an awful lot of mights and maybes in that fantasy paragragh of yours. Are we sure we want to base our towns hopes on those?

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Matthew Stoddard 4 years, 10 months ago

jk- There's also a lot of mights and maybes in some of what was said by the quotes in the story. Not everyone who moves here will use the Old Town Hot Springs, for one. I know plenty of people who don't, as it is. But with that many new homes, can honestly think these things can't happen? More people bring more opportunities for these things to occur.

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jk 4 years, 10 months ago

Mathew, I wish I shared in your optimism. I hope that things work out according to your fantasy or we will be paying money for years to come maintaining an empty graveyard of homes.

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addlip2U 4 years, 10 months ago

Mathew: as you well know - H2B/J2 are NOT permanent residents therefore they will be only renting, even if they do have a family, because their Visa/permit is temporary....unless they remain here illegally 0:)

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Matthew Stoddard 4 years, 10 months ago

addlip2u- I think you misunderstood me; I was saying that there would be less need for hiring out-of-country workers if families moved into an affordable (hopefully) area and could fill those jobs or create new businesses- hopefully, a Caribbean restaurant, considering the number of Jamaicans who work during the season. I'd love to be able to drive 4 miles for a Jerk Pork Sandwich or Conch Fritters or a nice Conch Salad! MMMMMmmmmm!!! I didn't mean this would be housing for the H2B/J2's to purchase, although more power to them if they can find a way to buy a home here to rent or visit.

Windle- even without the new development, we are in the midst of reduced wages and lower property values, since current valuations were based on sales during 2007-2008. I don't think anyone who can actually sell right now will get what their recent valuation stated.

A friend of mine who used to live in Steamboat II said the same thing about lowering their valuations when Heritage Park was going thru. Some pretty nice, pretty higher priced housing in that neighborhood. I also heard it about Silver Spur from some of those same people because the large lot sizes were priced so low. I live among almost million dollar or higher valued homes and mine jumped this year incredibly high. We almost have the highest per sq. ft. valuation, not that it would sell that high right now.

Biggest concern I have is the 13th St. bottleneck, but I agree with Mulcahy that it's been that way long before even Silver Spur was built. I think the 700 should put money toward it, but not pay for it outright. That's on the past governments we've had for not doing anything yet. That part can't be put on the 700, at least. It will exacerbate it, granted. That's why I believe they should put something toward it.

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Matthew Stoddard 4 years, 10 months ago

Mistyped there- my friend in Stmbt II was telling others who lived there were saying their values would drop if Heritage Park went in- not that he said it. Sorry.

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Martha D Young 4 years, 10 months ago

Lot's of food for thought here. Are there numbers from valid studies that show whether or not subdivisions pay for themselves? It's my impression that they don't. The rest of the taxpayers are left paying for their new neighbors' infrastructures et al. Overdevelopment is painfully visible in the newest projects downtown. I hope the prediction of the 700 annexation does come to a public vote. I'll sign the petition.

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sickofitall 4 years, 10 months ago

I would be willing to get signatures to take this to a vote. Lets do this..

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Fred Duckels 4 years, 10 months ago

I think anyone would be a fool to propose a project of this magnitude, if a vote is to decide their fate. We will have to be content with small projects that do not take a huge risk. I think that council needs to give full support, if we go to a vote, no washing their hands of responsability. To lead 700 down our chosen path to a slaughter, certainly would put us into the hall of shame. stillinsteamboat, I have voted against my pocketbook many times i.e. I supported the La Farge gravel pit when I sell them all their materials, check with them. I personally prefer less growth, but the laws are what they are, and I will accept that and not use redneck tactics to hinder others out of envy or ideology. It will take 700 a long time to affect the services that we are trying to heap on them today.

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