U.S. Freestyle Ski Team member Lacy Schnoor reacts after she learned that she had won the U.S. Olympic Team Trials at the Steamboat Ski Area Thursday morning. The victory mean's Schnoor will have a place at the 2010 Olympic Games in Vancouver.

Photo by John F. Russell

U.S. Freestyle Ski Team member Lacy Schnoor reacts after she learned that she had won the U.S. Olympic Team Trials at the Steamboat Ski Area Thursday morning. The victory mean's Schnoor will have a place at the 2010 Olympic Games in Vancouver.

Peterson, Schnoor take aerials

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2010 U.S. Winter Olympic Team Trials aerial results

Women

  1. Lacy Schnoor 177.83
  2. Ashley Caldwell 174.57
  3. Emily Cook 168.14
  4. Jaime Myers 141.91
  5. Jana Lindsey 128.38
  6. Allison Treleaven 95.38

Men

  1. Jeret Peterson 258.21
  2. Dylan Ferguson 231.23
  3. Ryan St. Onge 206.74
  4. Nevin Brown 201.63
  5. Scotty Bahrke 196.05
  6. Matthew DePeters 166.94
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Olympic Trials: aerials

Men's aerials winner Jeret Peterson talks with the press after Thursday's U.S. Olympic Trials competition at the Steamboat Ski Area.

Men's aerials winner Jeret Peterson talks with the press after Thursday's U.S. Olympic Trials competition at the Steamboat Ski Area.

— American aerialist Jeret “Speedy” Peterson seems to have a firm grasp on where he’s at in his career.

The two-time Olympian said locking up his 2010 Olympic roster spot on Thursday at the 2010 U.S. Winter Olympic Team Trials at Steamboat Ski Area was just a step in the right direction.

Although Peterson didn’t bust out his famed Hurricane maneuver — a twisting triple back flip — on Thursday, his two jumps were still good enough to lock up a place on the Olympic team.

Peterson’s two-jump score of 258.21 was good enough to hold off second-place finisher Dylan Ferguson and local favorite and third-place finisher Ryan St. Onge.

On the women’s side Lacy Schnoor held off relative unknown Ashley Caldwell to take a spot in Vancouver. Emily Cook finished third.

“I’m really excited this time,” Peterson said. “It’s a lot more pressure than it ever has been before. I think that’s just personal pressure I’m putting on myself. I know that I’m not 21 anymore. I’m 28 years old, and I’m not going to be doing this until I’m 60. It’s definitely getting down to the wire, and I’m doing everything that I can to end up on the podium.”

For most of the aerialists, Thursday wrapped up a horrid schedule. The team had one day to train after traveling more than 35 hours earlier in the week from World Cups in China to Steamboat. St. Onge — who graduated from The Lowell Whiteman School in 2001 — said Thursday was all just part of a long process for him. St. Onge felt he peaked before the 2006 Olympics in Torino. He said this season he plans to peak at the Olympics.

“I knew going into that last jump that there was no way for me to win,” St. Onge said. “So I took a step up, and I wanted to go big for the crowd. It didn’t work out for me in the end. But I’m very happy with the way I’m jumping. I’m looking forward to the rest of the season. … Really, my focus is on competing in the Olympics and not just getting there.”

Schnoor came from behind after her first run to chase down Caldwell. Schnoor completed her first-ever double, full, full — two twists in the first flip and one in the second — in a competition to make her first Olympic Games.

“I still can’t believe it,” she said. “I can’t believe I’m going to the Olympics, and I can’t wait to represent our country.”

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