For information and to register for the Steamboat Springs Marathon 10-kilometer race June 7, visit www.steamboatmarathon.com. Registration for the 10-km race is $25 until May 15, $30 from May 16 to June 3, and $35 on June 6. Registration closes at 5 p.m. June 6.

Photo by John F. Russell

For information and to register for the Steamboat Springs Marathon 10-kilometer race June 7, visit www.steamboatmarathon.com. Registration for the 10-km race is $25 until May 15, $30 from May 16 to June 3, and $35 on June 6. Registration closes at 5 p.m. June 6.

Get ready to run a 10K in 6 weeks or less

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To register

For information and to register for the Steamboat Springs Marathon 10-kilometer race June 7, visit www.steamboatmarathon.com. Registration for the 10-km race is $25 until May 15, $30 from May 16 to June 3, and $35 on June 6. Registration closes at 5 p.m. June 6.

The Steamboat Springs Marathon, a taunting reminder to the marginally fit Steamboat resident, will rear its head once again June 7, when runners from across the state and country tackle the 26.2-mile course up and down local hills.

But for the uninitiated runner, there is time yet to steel legs and nerves to face the challenge. A whole marathon may be stretching the limits of responsible training for the non-runner, but a 10-kilometer run, said experienced runner Todd Trapp, is feasible in just six weeks.

"If it's a person who is in shape, they're going to be able to do some running and get out and put in that time to be ready to run six miles," said Trapp, the Moffat County High School cross-country coach.

The key, he said, is consistency. For a person who exercises at least semi-regularly, there is a chance to increase the intensity gradually during six weeks as long as the potential runner sticks to a schedule

"This is all looking at a person who really hasn't been doing too much, but most people who want to finish a 10K will have been doing something," he said. "It's going to be tough if they haven't been doing cardio work, if they've just been doing yoga."

Trapp, a Craig resident, is an active runner in the Steamboat Springs community and won the 2008 Steamboat Springs Running Series with 137 points, 26 points ahead of the nearest competitor. Trapp took points in seven of the 10 races during the season and placed second in the 2008 Steamboat Springs Marathon.

Six-week prep plan

Week 1: Get into a rhythm. Training for this kind of race will require running three to four days a week, or more, until the race day. Taking more than a couple of days off will significantly hurt, Trapp said.

Start by running two to three miles at a time. The goal by the end of the regimen is to run five miles nonstop before the 6.2-mile race.

Week 2: Increase to three miles twice a week, with two miles on the other two or three days.

Week 3: Try to work up to a three- or four-mile run, Trapp said, with a recovery day of a two- or three-miler. By this time, a four-mile run should be possible. Training continues three to four days a week.

Week 4: By this time it should be possible to complete at least one run of four to five miles, Trapp said.

Week 5: At least one five-mile run should be completed by now. The rest of the days should include shorter runs of three or four miles, with runs five days a week.

Week 6: Marathon preparation. Run six days this week, up to four miles. Trapp recommends a speed accession Tuesday or Wednesday before Sunday's race.

Take Friday off, but run for about 35 minutes Saturday to loosen up.

The night before the marathon, chow down. Pasta is Trapp's favorite. In the morning, eat a small amount of food to replenish calories lost in the night and drink about 8 ounces of liquid per hour before the race to stay hydrated.

Now you're ready. Strap on the running shoes, take a last drink of water, and you're off. Next year, it's the marathon.

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