Conservative commentary: A servant's heart

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— When Sarah Palin made her stunning debut onto the American political stage last month, liberals around the country choked on their morning soy lattes and bagels with organic cream cheese. Meanwhile, as the left was trying to hide their angst, conservatives were doing "The Wave" from coast to coast and breathing a collective sigh of relief.

Whatever the shock level created by John McCain's announcement that he had chosen a dark horse as his running mate, the down-to-earth hockey mom on the 2008 GOP ticket has driven home the real contrasts in this election. On the one hand, we have a presidential candidate who talks about change and hope, while having no distinct message of what that really means or how to make it happen. Barack Obama never has had a clear plan for the country, nor do people have a defined sense of who he is.

Enter Sarah Palin: the moose huntin', gun totin' governor of Alaska who doesn't have to define herself. She is the real deal: an American woman who embodies the ideals that so many of us strive for. She is a multi-tasking mother, a wife, a successful mayor and, now, governor of a very vital state. She is articulate, attractive and smart. She gives a voice to the nation. While adding excitement to the McCain ticket, she and the maverick Arizona senator complement each other. Best of all, neither of them has to pretend to be someone they are not in order to win the race. They have no hidden agendas, no radical associates or sketchy relatives to have to throw under the bus until after the election.

To say that the left was thrown back on their heels by Sarah's arrival is an understatement. They were steamrolled and left lying on the ground, flat as pancakes. As for the reaction of Barack Obama himself, comedian Dennis Miller said it best, "She really has gotten deep inside of his melon." Yes, "The One" is off of his game, and his 4000 campaign advisers still are scurrying around trying to figure out what to do next. The Obama team continues to make mistakes. The candidate and his minions came out swinging and tried to besmirch and smear the Alaskan first family. This strategy backfired and actually has increased interest and support for Sarah. The Obama team just doesn't seem to get it. The latest word is that no less that 30 legal "experts" have parachuted into Wasilla and surrounding areas. They are swarming the Alaskan countryside like cockroaches, trying to dig up some dirt on the well-liked Alaskan native.

Desperate people do desperate things, and fear has been the common denominator for Democrats this year. They chose a fatally flawed nominee out of fear that Hillary would polarize the country and lose the election. Then, their unelectable candidate chose a safe but boring veep choice in Joe Biden. Buyer's remorse surely has set in with some in the chief Democratic operatives. But it's a little late for exchanges.

Our next president and vice president will be decided in just a very few short weeks. It is going to be a decision by the American people between two sharply contrasted visions for America. Sarah spoke about having a "servant's heart" at the Republican National Convention.

Country first.

John McCain has been a public servant, too, because he loves America. When he takes office in January, I want to see Sarah Palin by his side. They will lead as true leaders. They will keep us safe. They are the winning team. God bless them on their journey!

Mary K. Allen is a conservative activist who divides her time between Wisconsin and Steamboat Springs. Politics is her passion, and she works in both states to help elect conservative candidates to office.

Comments

Jonathan Casson 6 years, 2 months ago

Here's your VP candidate who, upon her nomination "conservatives were doing "The Wave" from coast to coast and breathing a collective sigh of relief."

Really?? This is who you think should be the VP?

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Jason Krueger 6 years, 3 months ago

Perhaps Maureen Down of the NY times could respond best to this article. The follow excerpt from her most recent column iswritten as instructions to candidate Obama: "...Call them liars (the Republicans), because that's what they are. Sarah Palin didn't say "thanks but no thanks" to the Bridge to Nowhere. She just said "Thanks." You (Obama) were raised by a single mother on food stamps - where does a guy with eight houses who was legacied into Annapolis get off calling you an elitist? And by the way, if you do nothing else, take that word back. Elite is a good word, it means well above average. I'd ask them what their problem is with excellence. While you're at it, I want the word "patriot" back. McCain can say that the transcendent issue of our time is the spread of Islamic fanaticism or he can choose a running mate who doesn't know the Bush doctrine from the Monroe Doctrine, but he can't do both at the same time and call it patriotic. They have to lie - the truth isn't their friend right now. Get angry. Mock them mercilessly; they've earned it. McCain decried agents of intolerance, then chose a running mate who had to ask if she was allowed to ban books from a public library. It's not bad enough she thinks the planet Earth was created in six days 6,000 years ago complete with a man, a woman and a talking snake, she wants schools to teach the rest of our kids to deny geology, anthropology, archaeology and common sense too? It's not bad enough she's forcing her own daughter into a loveless marriage to a teenage hood, she wants the rest of us to guide our daughters in that direction too? It's not enough that a woman shouldn't have the right to choose, it should be the law of the land that she has to carry and deliver her rapist's baby too? I don't know whether or not Governor Palin has the tenacity of a pit bull, but I know for sure she's got the qualifications of one. And you're worried about seeming angry? You could eat their lunch, make them cry and tell their mamas about it and God himself would call it restrained. There are times when you are simply required to be impolite. There are times when condescension is called for!"

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Fred Duckels 6 years, 3 months ago

God has been very vindictive, much to my disbelief, what else could explain the flood of liberals to set up camp in this valley? I guess we are not alone ,as I am seeing much of the same at the other resorts.

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Fred Duckels 6 years, 3 months ago

Jason: This Fannie Freddie thing was started under Clinton and Republicans tried to enact oversight since 02 and have been blocked by the Dems. My bank in Steamboat was forced to buy their stock last fall, does that sound like something that dim witted Republlicans would do?

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JLM 6 years, 3 months ago

Ahh, but the interesting thing is that you NEEDED the Internet search engine to know the quotation. A reasonably well read intellectually engaged person would have recognized the quote immediately. It was arguably Calvin Coolidge's greatest contribution to the English language.

The President of the Harvard Law Review is "elected" at the beginning of the third year of study before the electorate has more than just a whiff of one's definitive scholarship. It is in many ways a purely political decision. No mean feat but still not an objective measure of legal scholarship or achievement. Kind of like Obama just now --- full to overflowing with potential but just no ready evidence of actual performance.

I don't think any reasonable person would deny Sen Obama's a very, very smart chap. He is a graduate of Harvard Law and was a part time constitutional Prof for 12 years. He is certainly book smart.

But like many lawyers, he is overly clever --- trained to see equally both sides of an idea or concept and unable to divine the elemental truth, the moral or ethical answer. There is a considerable difference between the advocate who can see both sides of a dilemma and adopt that of his client and the person who can naturally gravitate to the moral or ethical rectitude of the issue. In that regard, Sen Obama follows that path of least resistance within the electorate which leads to the highest vote tally. Just a touch of character brings the ethical or moral considerations into finer balance leading unequivocally to the "right" answer and letting the consequences fend for themselves.

One cannot vote "present" on the great issues of the day and garner the requisite experience to make more important decisions in the future. Life requires a bit more than simply being present to find the right path.

I would despair of ever finding a good man to support for President if only his failings were on display or the only thing which we would all consider. In the balance of a man's life there is much to criticize. Rightfully so. After all almost all of good judgment is the result of having the experience gained from the exercise of bad judgment. Nonetheless, there is no substitute for having made enough judgments in a life to understand and recognize those which were good and those which were something less.

It is not the "living v dying" but rather the resistance v compliance. Living was a result of resisting. And that is where the character was revealed. There is simply no substitute for character. I am sure that there are many men who possess character but there are not many who have been so sorely tested and had it revealed in such a dramatic fashion. I would not wish it on anyone but I can see it and value it when I do. You demean yourself when you belittle what Sen McCain suffered, endured and overcame. Listen to the voices of his peers.

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JLM 6 years, 3 months ago

Maureen Down (well, actually, I am pretty sure you meant Maureen Dowd, but maybe not) is a fairly unlikely source of inspiration as it relates to how to react to the nomination of Governor Sarah Palin. She is a talker and supports the ultimate talker. Talkers talk and talk and talk and ultimately accomplish absolutely nothing.

Governor Sarah Palin, on the other hand, is a "doer." Somebody who actually accomplishes things in furtherance of the lives of her constituents. Perfect? Far from it. But actually in the game, engaged and trying to make something happen. Something good. And, wow, her constituents appear to approve wildly of her performance.

Sarah Palin is real and what the country needs just now is "real" people trying to solve "real" problems --- not rock stars, not fakirs, not poseurs.

There is absolutelly nothing wrong with "liberal" ideas. Who is really against universal health care? It's simply a matter of figuring out how to pay for it.

Let all the ideas wrestle and let's come up with the very best ideas and have some folks who have a track record of actually doing things --- not folks who were simply "present" when the great ideas of the day were debated and decided --- put them into action.

But let's have smart ideas --- not ideas like increasing the tax burden on the folks who are the most productive in the country and just giving the additional tax revenue to the slackers, not increasing taxes on capital when the capital markets are in chaos, not increasing the tax burden on small businesses which are the largest creators of new jobs. No, let's try to start out with pretty good ideas and let the debate make them better.

Vote for whomever you think can actually make something happen. For my money, I am going with a guy who has revealed a bit of character in tough times and a gal who can field dress a moose!

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Jason Krueger 6 years, 3 months ago

Only because I am nowhere near as elloquent as the following:

OUR NATION ON WHITE PRIVILEGE

By Tim Wise

For those who still can't grasp the concept of white privilege, or who are constantly looking for some easy-to-understand examples of it, perhaps this list will help.

White privilege is when you can get pregnant at seventeen like Bristol Palin and everyone is quick to insist that your life and that of your family is a personal matter, and that no one has a right to judge you or your parents, because "every family has challenges," even as black and Latino families with similar "challenges" are regularly typified as irresponsible, pathological and arbiters of social decay.

White privilege is when you can call yourself a "f*in' redneck," like Bristol Palin's boyfriend does, and talk about how if anyone messes with you, you'll "kick their fn' as," and talk about how you like to "shoot sht" for fun, and still be viewed as a responsible, all-American boy (and a great son-in-law to be) rather than a thug.

White privilege is when you can attend four different colleges in six years like Sarah Palin did (one of which you basically failed out of, then returned to after making up some coursework at a community college), and no one questions your intelligence or commitment to achievement, whereas a person of color who did this would be viewed as unfit for college, and probably someone who only got in in the first place because of affirmative action.

White privilege is when you can claim that being mayor of a town smaller than most medium-sized colleges, and then Governor of a state with about the same number of people as the lower fifth of the island of Manhattan, makes you ready to potentially be President, and people don't all piss on themselves with laughter, while being a black U.S. Senator, two-term state Senator, and constitutional law scholar, means you're "untested."

White privilege is being able to say that you support the words "under God" in the pledge of allegiance because "if it was good enough for the founding fathers, it's good enough for me," and not be immediately disqualified from holding office--since, after all, the pledge was written in the late 1800s and the "under God" part wasn't added until the 1950s--while believing that reading accused criminals and terrorists their rights (because, ya know, the Constitution, which you used to teach at a prestigious law school requires it), is a dangerous and silly idea only supported by mu shy liberals.

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Jason Krueger 6 years, 3 months ago

White privilege is being able to be a gun enthusiast and not make people immediately scared of you.?

White privilege is being able to have a husband who was a member of an extremist political party that wants your state to secede from the Union, and whose motto was "Alaska first," and no one questions your patriotism or that of your family, while if you're black and your spouse merely fails to come to a 9/11 memorial so she can be home with her kids on the first day of school, people immediately think she's being disrespectful.?

White privilege is being able to make fun of community organizers and the work they do--like, among other things, fight for the right of women to vote, or for civil rights, or the 8-hour workday, or an end to child labor--and people think you're being pithy and tough, but if you merely question the experience of a small town mayor and 18-month governor with no foreign policy expertise beyond a class she took in college--you're somehow being mean, or even sexist.?

White privilege is being able to convince white women who don't even agree with you on any substantive issue to vote for you and your running mate anyway, because all of a sudden your presence on the ticket has inspired confidence in these same white women, and made them give your party a "second look."

White privilege is being able to fire people who didn't support your political campaigns and not be accused of abusing your power or being a typical politician who engages in favoritism, while being black and merely knowing some folks from the old-line political machines in Chicago means you must be corrupt.?

White privilege is being able to attend churches over the years whose pastors say that people who voted for John Kerry or merely criticize George W. Bush are going to hell, and that the U.S. is an explicitly Christian nation and the job of Christians is to bring Christian theological principles into government, an d who bring in speakers who say the conflict in the Middle East is God's punishment on Jews for rejecting Jesus, and everyone can still think you're just a good church-going Christian, but if you're black and friends with a black pastor who has noted (as have Colin Powell and the U.S. Department of Defense) that terrorist attacks are often the result of U.S. foreign policy and who talks about the history of racism and its effect on black people, you're an extremist who probably hates America.?

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Jason Krueger 6 years, 3 months ago

White privilege is not knowing what the Bush Doctrine is when asked by a reporter, and then people get angry at the reporter for asking you such a "trick question," while being black and merely refusing to give one-word answers to the queries of Bill O'Reilly means you're dodging the question, or trying to seem overly intellectual and nuanced.

White privilege is being able to claim your experience as a POW has anything at all to do with your fitness for President, while being black and experiencing racism is, as Sarah Palin has referred to it a "light" burden.

And finally, white privilege is the only thing that could possibly allow someone to become president when he has voted with George W. Bush 90 percent of the time, even as unemployment is skyrocketing, people are losing their homes, inflation is rising, and the U.S. is increasingly isolated from world opinion, just because white voters aren't sure about that whole "change" thing. Ya know, it's just too vague and ill-defined, unlike, say, four more years of the same, which is very concrete and certain.

White privilege is, in short, the problem.

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JLM 6 years, 3 months ago

White, really? White? That is about the shallowest, most nonsensical thing I have ever read. Of all the things one might make as an observation or distinction, I cannot imagine anything more contrived. What is a white person to do?

For a campaign which dares race not to be a factor, this tripe injects it front and center. This is bankrupt liberal thinking at its very worst and is not worthy of a candidate like Sen Obama.

While one might disagree with his record, views or plans, it is not his color which makes them objectionable. And, if his color is not a factor, then that of his opponent should not be either.

Sheesh!

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Fred Duckels 6 years, 3 months ago

Snowbow: Given, Palin does not have an Ivy degree, but can you imagine a more ridiculous scenerio than the present situation that our country finds itself. I said during the S@L mess that we should not have one politician left standing in Washington. The same goes today. An Ivy league diploma helps one to develop connections to be used later to feather ones nest. The Ivy leaguers have failed miserably through incompetence and greed. Lets give common sense and honesty a chance. A degree is a paper that says the liberal establishment has agreed that you have met their curriculum.

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Jason Krueger 6 years, 3 months ago

This wasn't written by the Obama campaign so don't blame them for it. Apparently however you're missing the point of the article. Do you deny (substitute the words "rabid conservative right" for White and "common sense" for Black) the observations of the article? As you and I have debated before, the point is there is zero evidence that McCain and his bimbo sidekick have anything to offer this country other than an additional 4 years of what we've been dealing with. Based on my quality of life, this country was in much better shape when the democrats were running things (obviously, as we all seemed to find the time to try to impeach the President over a blowjob rather than anything substantive) than where we are now. You often preach your distaste for democratic principles of tax policy, social services, etc. yet the Republican's policies are what have brought us to the position we are in today and not once have you, or any of the rest of the conservative movement admitted any responsibility for this.

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misterkindbuds 6 years, 3 months ago

Hey Fred,

Instead of your Republican, Fox News-fact-based responses, how about you provide some facts.

It seems your campaign has fooled everyone in your party (yourself included) into thinking whatever they say is the truth.

So please, either admit you are a liar or admit you are a fool.

Or - do what your Republican buddies are doing and keep posting false information.

P.S. I'll wait for Rush Limbaugh to finish so you can draft your response from what he says.

P.P.S. - Dems didn't control Congress (and then barely) until 2006, so start a new lie.

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JustSomeJoe 6 years, 3 months ago

Fred - you are hilarious, "the flood of liberals camped out in the valley". As though conservatives have a birth right here, as you apply the same "I'm a local" scorn to politics as you do to someone who moved here after you.

What do you mean the Fannie and Freddie thing started with the Clintons? You still have the same, Rush Limbaugh, knee-jerk reaction to everything, blame Clinton. The Clinton who left this administration with a budget surplus. Fannie Mae was started in 1938, but it was Clinton who screwed it up? In 2002 the house, senate and President were all republican, but you blame it on democrats? Blame it on lobbyists maybe, but Democrats?

Your bank was forced to buy stock? That's one of the funniest and non-informed things you have said I'm sure. Banks aren't allowed to own equity in their investment portfolio, so take that statement and put it back where ever you pulled it out of.

I love your strategy. Blame it on Democrats, even the stuff you made up. bravo.

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Jason Krueger 6 years, 3 months ago

Fred- As long as your making blanket statements, it's the "flood of liberals" that is keeping your business afloat. What would you be doing if this valley wasn't being inundated?

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nikobesti 6 years, 3 months ago

Jason, thanks for posting the Tim Wise piece. Brilliant. However, I wouldn't chalk all this up to "white privilege." Karl Rove and the Republicans have been conducting (and winning) fear and smear campaigns in 2000 and 2004 when the Dem candidates were not black. To me, this is good old fashioned GOP hypocrisy and double-speak which as defined this party for the last 8+ years. It's "neocon privilege." (However, I fully agree that if Obama had a son who's Facebook page had "kick their fn' as," and talk about how you like to "shoot sht" for fun, Rush, Coulter and company would have some choice "thug life" quotes for him).

JLM, I see your point about injecting race, but that aside, what in the Wise piece is incorrect? For exampl, why does Bill O'Rilley level attacks at Jamie Lynn Spears and say her parents are at fault when she's pregnant, but call it a "blessing" when it's Palin's daughter? Would you care to address these obvious inconsistencies?

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Fred Duckels 6 years, 3 months ago

Rob Douglas, I'm slowly learning to stir the pot, what do you think? In the past, regardless of party the area was mostly conservative. Many of you decided to move here because of the people and the beauty of the valley. Why do you have to change everything? Boulder is not that far away, we don't need to invent Boulder Springs. I have many favorable liberal views, but our country was based on competition and I cannot see it being ruled by those that use politics to achieve goals that were not competitive in the market. Crank up the liberal nitpicking folks! I did just fine in business before you all arrived. By now it should be obvious that I don't vote with my pocketbook. I wish that more woulld follow that lead, it would make for a much healthier community.

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Matthew Stoddard 6 years, 3 months ago

Fred- I don't "stirring the pot" is what you are doing. You're just injecting your personal opinions based on what the Far-Right talking points tell you say. In fact, you haven't added anything of substance except to trash others on this thread as "liberal," the FIRST argument of the Far-Right when attacking based on having no rebuttal. It's textbook.

Republicans led Congress for 12yrs- half under Clinton, half under Bush. Nothing was done with Wall Street oversight at any time during those 12yrs. In fact, Far-Right mantra is to let the free market sort it out, with limited government intruding. Now, we are spending 3/4 of a trillion TAX PAYER dollars to help the "free market." Might have cost us less had the oversight been installed earlier.

If you did business just fine before "all the liberals" moved here, you must be going out of business now, correct? No- just saw an ad for Duckels Construction still looking help, so you must still be doing nicely. So let's hear how you attribute that to doing business conservatively in a liberal market.

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Dan Hill 6 years, 3 months ago

JLM said: "But like many lawyers, he is overly clever trained to see equally both sides of an idea or concept and unable to divine the elemental truth, the moral or ethical answer. There is a considerable difference between the advocate who can see both sides of a dilemma and adopt that of his client and the person who can naturally gravitate to the moral or ethical rectitude of the issue"

Can we please let go of the idea that there are black and white answers to the challenges facing us. There are no solutions, only trade offs. If the answers were so obvious the problems would have been solved long ago.

One would have thought that the results of eight years of this kind of thinking would give the Republicans pause. But it seems not. The one thing Gov Palin exudes is confidence, untroubled by whether or not she understands the issues. Hard to see how more of the same is putting "Country First".

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Jason 6 years, 2 months ago

You will have to define victory. Is victory when the enemy is all dead? Because this war has created more enemies then it has captured or killed.

And the poor judgment McCain showed by wanting to invade Iraq in the first place is a large strike against his judgment.

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nikobesti 6 years, 3 months ago

Now, Mary, I can't let this stand. Your contribution sits right in line with the Republican strategy this campaign: subtle and outright lies. You take your assertions straight from Rush and the other pundits and offer zero evidence to back up your points. Tell you what, I'll give you a chance to improve your writing. Let me just hit on two major ones.

You wrote:

On the one hand, we have a presidential candidate who talks about change and hope, while having no distinct message of what that really means or how to make it happen. Barack Obama never has had a clear plan for the country, nor do people have a defined sense of who he is.

  1. Barack has articulated detailed plans. Please check http://www.barackobama.com/issues/. Here he has an 8-page energy plan, for example. Can you tell me about the McCain energy plan? If it stretches beyond screaming "Drill Baby Drill!" over and over again, I haven't heard it.

  2. Regarding candidates not offering solutions or even a "sense of who they are," let's talk about Mrs. Palin. I wanted to come away from Sarah Palin's RNC speech with an idea what she stood for. What policies does she advocate? How would these policies bring about the change even the Republicans admit we need? Instead, I saw that Sarah Palin stands for insults, smears, and attacks. Fear Obama! Your taxes will go up (despite his tax plan). Terrorists will win! Gas prices will skyrocket and Saudis will win! FEAR OBAMA! Please look at Palin's speech and tell me where she talked about clear plans. Additionally, Palin has had several opportunities after the RNC speech to share her clear plans. Instead, we got scripted answers. How do scripted answers show a "sense of who she is?"

continued...

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nikobesti 6 years, 3 months ago

continued...

Mary wrote:

The candidate and his minions came out swinging and tried to besmirch and smear the Alaskan first family.

This is the biggest whopper in there, and it this "victim card" has been played again and again by the right. This is a complete lie; Obama and his campaign have stuck to his word that families are off limits. Only one simple question here, Mary: tell me one, just one, single instance where the Obama campaign has attacked and/or smeared Sarah Palin's family. Please note that posts you read on DailyKos don't count. I cannot let this outright lie go. However, if you name me one smear I'll concede.

Likewise, I'd like to you provide any proof you have that "Buyer's remorse surely has set in." Finally, I wonder how you can say "It is going to be a decision by the American people between two sharply contrasted visions for America" when you claim Obama doesn't have a platform.

I just hope, really hope, the public fact checks McCain's obvious lies. Factcheck.org, folks. Read it. I'm not saying the Obama campaign doesn't have their fair share as well, but by all critical analysis, they don't compare to McCains "pants on fire" lies that his campaign repeats again, and again, and again. (http://www.slate.com/id/2199923/) It won't work this time, folks. Not this time.

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Fred Duckels 6 years, 3 months ago

Matt: You have a habit of presenting what you think ,that I think,as fact. It may strengthen your arguement but I would rather describe it as hip shooting. I will speak for myself.

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Matthew Stoddard 6 years, 3 months ago

Fred- Did you not just print above:

"In the past, regardless of party the area was mostly conservative. Many of you decided to move here because of the people and the beauty of the valley. Why do you have to change everything?"

and in the same post,

"I did just fine in business before you all arrived. By now it should be obvious that I don't vote with my pocketbook. I wish that more woulld follow that lead, it would make for a much healthier community."

So- explain that if you did just fine before liberals arrived...what happened afterward? There must have been some other point, otherwise to say you did just fine before liberals arrived would need to be put into context- meaning, as opposed to how "fine" you are doing since the liberals came to the valley.

And what do you descibe as "not voting with a pocketbook?"

You have some great soundbites that never get explained. You sound like a politician running for office yourself. So- speak for yourself and explain what you mean. It might just make your argument strengthen. Until then, your "hip shooting" doesn't work well when you need "hip waders" to trudge thru your post.

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Fred Duckels 6 years, 3 months ago

Matt: My mother told me never argue wijth a liberal. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.

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JLM 6 years, 3 months ago

I hate to cloud the discussion with detailed facts as everybody's having such fun but it might be willing to look into the legislative history of SB 190. To save you a bit or work, it was a bill sponsored by Sen John S McCain in 2005 which was opposed in the Senate Banking Committee on a straight party line Democratic vote (oh, yeah, by this time the Democratics controlled the Senate Banking Committee) and which would reigned in the affairs of Freddie and Fannie. It went down to defeat on a straight party line Democratic vote because Freddie and Fannie had focused their political largesse on who?

Senators Dodd, Obama, Clinton and Biden.

Read it and let me know if I am wrong?

This is from whence the F & F crisis was spawned because these Democratic Senators were bought off and did not provide the leadership to solve the problem.

This is why the McCain - Feingold campaign reform is so critically important to our country.

McCain was right and Obama was wrong. Now we pay the price for Obama's judgment.

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Fred Duckels 6 years, 3 months ago

JLM: That was my take on it but it is almost impossible to be heard among the opposite agenda. Obama was second in campaign contributions from the boys right after Dodd.

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Matthew Stoddard 6 years, 3 months ago

I'm a moderate Republican. Go right ahead and indulge, otherwise, you fall into what Far-Righties call liberals- no substance categories. Do you really wish to lump yourself in as a liberal?

As for being pulled down and being beaten with experience is "liberal," then you should be just fine. You seem to have no problem. Welcome to the Liberal Pit, I guess. McCain obviously enjoys it here, since he's doing the same thing in ads that Bush did to him. I guess he thinks it's better to win an election than keep his dignity. This is why I won't vote for him this election, when I voted for him against Bush.

Yeah- this is probably why you shouldn't argue with liberals or anyone else; you don't seem to have anything particularly clear or comprehensive to say. Such is the way of the Far-Right. Nice soundbites, but nothing past that.

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Jason 6 years, 3 months ago

Fred - your comments about higher education are absurd.

"An Ivy league diploma helps one to develop connections to be used later to feather ones nest. The Ivy leaguers have failed miserably through incompetence and greed. Lets give common sense and honesty a chance. A degree is a paper that says the liberal establishment has agreed that you have met their curriculum."

Spoken like someone who couldn't get into a good school. I suppose you would not encourage your children to go to college.

Common sense and honesty may work very well as a person's only assets when getting by in a small town, or governing small states. But, for the most powerful positions in this nation and on this planet, common sense and honesty MUST accompany a top-notch education. A firm understanding of constitutional law as well as a comprehensive understanding of world history are necessities to govern the United States and represent our country abroad.

As for Mary K. Allen, instead of telling people that Obama has no plan and that people do not have a sense of who he is, try reading his books. Then listen to or read his nomination speech. If you still can't understand his vision, then you're not being honest with yourself.

continued...

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Jason 6 years, 3 months ago

continued...

Education is not an enemy. Education is necessary for context. Don't try to demonize intelligence.

Intelligent people understand attending 6 colleges and ending up with a degree from the University of Idaho is NOT better preparation for the top job in the world than graduating from an Ivy League school. McCain was 894th out of 899 at the Naval Academy. Obama attended Columbia University graduate school and graduated with a B.A. in Political Science with specialization in international relations. His thesis topic was Soviet nuclear disarmament. His opponent's time as a POW did not provide this sort of insight on foreign relations. While McCain did his time in an unthinkably horrible situation and emerged honorably, I think it did very little for his knowledge, and understanding of world affairs. Obama then went to Harvard Law School where he graduated magna cum laude and was the President of the Harvard Law Review.

If you were giving interviews for a position at your company, do you think you would hire McCain or Obama? Education is a large part of anyone's resume. If you think it does not matter, then you need more of it yourself.

Also, if you think Obama's resume stops at his education check out the full thing: http://obamasresume.org/

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JLM 6 years, 3 months ago

"Nothing in the world can take the place of Persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan 'Press On' has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race."

Who made the above statement? $100 to the first correct identifier of the author of the above quotation!

Education is only one component in the development of a person's capabilities. It is an important component but like any ingredient in a really good gumbo, no individual ingredient can be singularly responsible for the final result. It is the combination of the ingredients and the temperature which determines the final taste.

Sen Obama seemingly has a great education but is he just another "educated derelict"? Does he have character?

If you could determine the relative proportions of education and character in a man's composition which would you personally value more dearly?

Folks are fond of saying that tough times create character. I think that tough times reveal character. Some folks simply have no character to be revealed.

What did Sen McCain learn in that hell hole in Hanoi? He learned to persist and to press on! He revealed the character within. He took responsibility for himself and others and he saved his own damn life. He looked into the abyss and he soared.

How has Gov Palin accomplished all that she has accomplished? When faced with adversity, she presses on and does not allow adversity to determine the outcome. She takes control of the situation and makes the future what she wants it to be.

Just for the record, Sen Obama went to Occidental as an undergrad for 2 years and finished his undergrad education at Columbia. He did not attend grad school at Columbia. He was an undistinguished student at Columbia. He knocked them dead at Harvard Law School. Both he and Michelle were the direct beneficiaries of affirmative action. On the merits? Maybe not so much? The guy is certainly a clever and smart fellow. Does he have character and, if so, where was it revealed and in what experience? I personally think the guy is a fakir and a poseur, but that's just me.

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Jason 6 years, 3 months ago

Calvin Coolidge - easy enough with the internet at your finger tips.

I agree that education alone cannot define a man, but you must agree that a person must be more than "clever and smart" to become the president of the Harvard Law Review. It takes substantial intellect and complex thinking.

McCain has indeed proven his character and displayed his determination, but I don't see the judgment that requires a sharp, intricate thinking style in him or his running mate. I don't see them as thinkers. Ok you're gonna say we need doers and not thinkers:but doing without thinking is a poor way to govern. You end up with knee jerk politics, black and white answers to everything. We all know the world comes in ample shades of gray.

Character alone cannot guide the decisions that the president is required to make.

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Jason Krueger 6 years, 3 months ago

Surviving 4 years in a POW camp is not "character" -it's a basic evolutionary instinct. A person does not have "character" merely because they made the evolutionary appropriate decision to live rather than die. Get off you POW, McCain hero soapbox. He's a liar (his advertisement stating Obama wants to teach sex ed. to 5 year olds), an adulterer (divorced his wife) and a fear monger (listen to his convention speech). -Claiming he's a politician doesn't excuse any of this behavior.
By the way, you can't keep shouting Obama is a product of affirmative action and in the same breath say, don't get me wrong, I'm in favor of affirmative action. It's like saying I'm not racist, I have a lot of black friends.

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Jason Krueger 6 years, 3 months ago

While we're all utilizing internet search engines, why don't your Right- wing folks find out who said the following: "The United States was in no sense founded on the Christian religion."

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Marie Matta 6 years, 3 months ago

JLM - yes, it is just you! You have obviously taken a dislike to Senator Obama, and that's fine - it's your right to prefer Senator McCain over him, but you are clutching at straws to discredit him. You have used the terms "fakir" and poseur" multiple times in various posts on this website, but do you really understand what they mean? You have given no explanation of why you think they apply to Senator Obama. The Collins Dictionary defines "fakir" as "a member of any religious order of Islam" or "a Hindu ascetic mendicant". Do you really believe Senator Obama is Muslim or Hindu? Do you think he is just pretending to be Christian and, if elected, will suddenly emerge in Islamic or Hindu dress and flip the White House into a mosque or a temple? As for "poseur", it is defined as "a person who strikes an attitude or assumes a pose in order to impress others", a term which would apply equally to Senator McCain. After all, doesn't every Presidential candidate work to impress and win over the electorate to their own message? Furthermore, you argue that no single ingredient, such as education, should determine a person's capabilities, yet you suggest that Senator McCain's military experience stands alone in making him the superior candidate.

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JLM 6 years, 3 months ago

I see Obama as a bit more of a dervish or an ascetic. Granted a bit more subtle meaning of the work fakir.

I think his performance on his grand Mid Eastern and European tour might just win him an Oscar for the Poseur of the Year. He is certainly polling in that direction.

The speech in Berlin was just priceless. "Ich bin ein poseur!" He's absolutely the best runway model since JFK. Of course JFK waited until he was actually President before visiting Berlin. It had all the dignity of a Junior Prom. But, hey, that could just be me.

Pardon me for wanting the next President to know just a smidgen about the military given that we are in TWO WARS just now. The messy business with the resurgence of Russia repleat with that dust up in Georgia, the threats to Poland, the visits to Venezuela. Well yes, a bit of military know how might just come in handy just now.

To say nothing of the huge differences in the judgments of the candidates on the issue of the surge in Iraq. Sen McCain was apparently right way before it was fashionable to be right and Sen Obama --- who covered himself in glory in that lame explanation on the OReilly show --- was not.

So, yes, just now a bit of military experience would be just fine with me. Only ingredient? No but an important one just the same. Kind of like wanting actual clams in clam chowder, don't you think?

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JLM 6 years, 3 months ago

While Obama may ultimately lose this election --- my wholehearted wish to be sure --- make no mistake that he is here in part because he is, in fact, black. The sheer novelty of his candidacy as a black man trumped the novelty of Sen Clinton's womanhood. I was just about to say "femininity" but I caught myself in time. LOL

There is absolutely nothing wrong with affirmative action. Just don't fail to acknowledge that it exists. One cannot support it if it is a secret.

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JLM 6 years, 3 months ago

Well actually, Danny Boy, there are a whole lot of black and white answers to challenges --- case in point the Iraq war. Regardless of how we got in, there is victory and there is defeat. Which one works for you.

Count me on the side of victory.

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Marie Matta 6 years, 2 months ago

JLM, it's easy to consider yourself on the side of victory, the hard question is what does victory mean? 5 1/2 years on, what would constitute victory? For all the Bush Administration and the McCain campaign's arrogant talk about it, they have not defined it or provided a measure for it. Do this Government, the Republican campaign and the supporters of this war even care what the Iraqis would consider to be victory? It is their country, after all, or has this small fact been sacrificed to the perceived interests of the United States. Yes, it will be a happy day when this war ends, but after all the death, destruction and lies, I don't see how there could be any real winners.

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Jason Krueger 6 years, 2 months ago

JLM- I thought we already had victory in Iraq??? Didn't GW Bush stand in front of a huge banner pronouncing "Mission Accomplished"? Your reference to Iraq being black and white was awful. The black and white victory vs. defeat is LONG since passed there. Regardless of the outcome America will never be able to say we were 100% victorious there (hence, the shades of gray). Hopefully sometime in all of our lifetime, Iraq will be returned to the country it was in the 70's and 80's. Regardless though, there will never be a complete victory there. Far too much damage and ill-will has been created in this ill-devised, mismanaged war.

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Dan Hill 6 years, 2 months ago

JLM, are we in Junior High where if you can't respond intelligently you start using silly names?

The name is Daniel not Danny Boy. Grow up.

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Jason Krueger 6 years, 2 months ago

JLM- Your comment regarding wanting "miliatary" experience in a leader also falls flat. You voted for G.W. Bush 8 years ago. That leadership was full of people who had zero military experience (Bush, Cheney, Rumsfeld, Rice). The only person who knew anything in their inner circle was Powell (and to borrow your term, the only honorable one) and he was ousted. I can't imagine Obama doing any worse with the military than those 4 did. -Don't even use Bush's national guard experience. The guy hardly showed up.

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misterkindbuds 6 years, 2 months ago

Do you not think if the McCain-Palin ticket is elected and something happens to McCain, we won't be tested military-wise?

Do you trust that bad sportscaster, rape-victim-blamer, gun-totin', moose-killin', creationism-believin', evolution-rejectin', four-time college dropout to keep you and your kids safe?

I will start digging my bomb shelter on election day.

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Jonathan Casson 6 years, 2 months ago

First of all- the article that started this thread is one of the most silly, vapid and pointless commentaries I've seen in this paper from either side. Not once does Ms. Allen mention one actual fact in this whole piece of worthless drivel. Just once, from either party, I'd appreciate a substantive argument as why I should vote for one candidate over another. Take the time to research both candidates actual ideas and tell me why your candidates ideas are better than the other.

Ms Allens argument includes this statement.

"The latest word is that no less that 30 legal "experts" have parachuted into Wasilla and surrounding areas."

Huh? C'mon! That's part of your argument why I should vote for McCain? The latest word from who??? Show me one credible news source that has verified this silly assertion. I searched for any substantive news about this claim- this is the only article I could find.

http://www.adn.com/news/alaska/ap_alaska/story/522292.html

8 supporters planning a picnic at a lake is hardly "swarming the Alaskan countryside like cockroaches, trying to dig up some dirt on the well-liked Alaskan native." But, no doubt, many intelligent Americans think this patently false rumor is true because someone posted it on the internet.

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Matthew Stoddard 6 years, 2 months ago

JLM- Unfortunately, you are wrong on the S. 190 vote and who was in control, along with the sponsors of it.

SB 190 was the "The Federal Housing Enterprise Regulatory Reform Act of 2005 (S. 190)" It was sponsored by Senate Banking Committee Chairman Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Alabama) and co-sponsored by Sen. Chuck Hagel (R-Nebraska). This bill passed committee 11-9, along party lines. McCain didn't become a sponsor until 2007. (Only Hagel, Sununu and Dole were listed on the 2005 bill language.)

http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=s109-190

The Democrats also submitted an alternative. The main difference between the two is the Republicans wanted Freddie/Fannie to also sell portfolio assets unrelated to their mortgage securities business. There was also the point that Republicans brought up that here was not ENOUGH portfolio guidance. Amazing! Republicans WANTED to have more governmental control on people's banking! Both died off due to a new Congress (110th) starting up. All bill not covered in 109th had to be resubmitted, which this particular bill was and still sits.

http://www.allbusiness.com/government/532756-1.html

You also forgot to say that will S. 190 died, S. 1100 of 2007 is still in there, since it's for a new 110th Congress to vote on. McCain isn't sponsoring this one, for some reason. It hasn't been killed yet, and it's been read twice.

http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=s110-1100&tab=summary

And Fred- had you actually meant to say all that...you'd have actually said it, correct? Or is JLM only allowed to speak for you when you don't do it yourself?

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Jonathan Casson 6 years, 2 months ago

Mr Duckels- two points- 1. You state "this Fannie Freddie thing was started under Clinton and Republicans tried to enact oversight since 02 and have been blocked by the Dems."

Uh- isnt it the the Republican view that LESS regulation (i.e. oversight) is better. Now you say its the Republicans that wanted more regulation but were blocked by the Democrats??

Anyway- What I think you're referring to is the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act of 1999 that overturned portions of the Glass-Steagal Act of 1933. The Glass-Steagal Act essentially stated that financial services institutions could not also be savings banks. That was in response to banks that used their depositors money to invest in the stock market. When the market crashed, the depositors lost their saving and started the Great Depression. The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act reversed that law and allowed for financial institutions to combine their offerings under one roof. As a result, banks and other companies began investing their money in mortgage backed securities based on the enormous short term profit to be gained on these securities. Once the housing bubble burst- these securities were essentially worthless which spiraled into the current crisis.

Obviously this is very simple portion of a complex issue and there is plenty of bipartisan blame to go around. The Act was passed by a large majority in both the House and Senate then was signed into law by Pres Clinton. Note: the only non-voting member of the Senate on this bill: John McCain. However, another interesting point is that McCain's former financial policy advisor is Phil Gramm, co-author of the Act. Yup, the same Phil Gramm who stepped down from the McCain campaign after calling our recession "mental" and the US has become "a nation of whiners"

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/07/10/mccain.gramm/index.html

Check out his follow up quote: "Thank God the economy is not as bad as you read in the newspaper every day."

Your second point about education states "An Ivy league diploma helps one to develop connections to be used later to feather ones nest. The Ivy leaguers have failed miserably through incompetence and greed."

Ummmm...George W Bush went to Yale as did his father. So, yes, I'd agree with you on this one.

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Duke_bets 6 years, 2 months ago

Fred - You're "slowly learning" is the understatement of the year.

I know I'm stating the obvious, but Republicans have actually been in office since 2000.

And, college graduates using their education to better themselves................What a philosophy!

Lastly, your bank being forced to buy stock............What? Did you make that up and not realize how foolish it sounded? Or, did one of your braintrusts tell you that and you did not realize how foolish it sounded?

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JLM 6 years, 2 months ago

Donald Rumsfeld was a naval aviator for 3 years (1954-57) and flew the Panther (Grumman F9F Panther fighter) from carrier decks and was also a flight instructor.

The Panther was a nifty little nimble fighter and was credited with the first kill of an enemy aircraft in the Korea War. It was initially the only plane which could hang with the Mig 15.

DR served in the Active Reserves until about 1975 when he was named Sec of Defense for the first time. I think this was the Ford administration if my memory serves me correctly.

This created a very unusual problem as he was the Sec Def and a Reservist of fairly junior rank. He transferred to the IRR (Individual Ready Reserve) thereafter and retired as a Captain (Colonel for us Army types).

For tonight only --- Further Affiant Sayeth Not --- as my brain is scrambled a bit from dodging summer cumulus clouds all day myself though I was not flying a Panther.

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Steve Lewis 6 years, 2 months ago

Briefly, My choice for Obama stems from Democratic values. True, I have little pride in the elected Dems currently running Washington, so Obama may prove another disappointment.

But there's another score where he again would garner my vote. I feel Obama has the foundation to best absorb the changing fabric of the globe, and the upset within the U.S.

McCain's experience is good, but at 72 I just don't expect mental agility in his future to deal with nuanced foriegn policy, nuanced economy.

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JLM 6 years, 2 months ago

In the spirit of full disclosure, I am voting against Obama and therefore find myself voting for McCain by process of default.

I think you raise a great question as it relates to McCain --- how nimble is his mind and how fundamentally smart is a guy who graduated at the bottom of his Annapolis class? Clever --- a bit. Smart --- maybe not so much? Smart enough --- likely so.

It is not a difficult decision for me to make to vote for McCain as he champions fundamental policies and values with which I agree and I recoil at the policies and values of his opponent.

I take just a bit of comfort that the selection of Cabinet officials provides the opportunity to draw from the deep end of the pool for help. In that regard, I am convinced that McCain will select folks who will provide some good bench depth in the government.

And, in the final analysis almost all of a President's ideas must be converted into actual legislation by Congressional action. Though I must say that is not so comforting given the low regard in which Congress is rightfully held.

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Matthew Stoddard 6 years, 2 months ago

JLM- Condi Rice and Bush go waaaaaaay back. By bringing her up, all you did was point out that Jason was right that he appointed cronies. He THOUGHT Powell would be the same, but Powell noted that Iraq was not the right way to go. This is why he didn't continue in his position.

And don't bring up Democrats & Hollywood when Palin is talked about as a "rockstar" for the Republicans. We also see what happens to rockstars- they end up in rehab.

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Jason Krueger 6 years, 2 months ago

JLM- Your last post was perhaps the least offensive of all of your posts- you support McCain because you support his policies. That's fine. I disagree with you but you have the right to believe those policies are good (much like you have the right to believe the world is flat despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary!) I too USED to take comfort in a President selecting competent Cabinet officials more educated in particular areas of policy than the President but that comfort was lost over the past 8 years as well. G.W.'s insistence on loyalty over competence (Gonzales, Mike Brown, Ashcroft, etc.) shattered that belief.
I truly have a hard time finding ANYTHING in America that has benefited from the last 8 years of Republican leadership.

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JLM 6 years, 2 months ago

Don't let the facts get in the way of a good little hissy fit --- Gen Colin Powell, Sec Condolezza Rice --- what do these appointments say about the President's views on things? Robert Gates, Mike Hayden, Paulson, Chertoff --- these are very high quality folks at the very pinnacle of their professions and would be welcomed in any administration.

Your school marmish condescending view fails to acknowledge the reality of 7.5 years of safety from domestic terrorism. I wonder if that might be a benefit? Hey, maybe even a high priority benefit? Wipe the koolaid off your chin and take a peek at reality.

I do so appreciate your permission to believe what I know. This is the problem with the Democrats --- they think they are annointed to do the common man's thinking but they possess neither common sense nor country wit nor native intelligence.

Sen Obama's comments about guns, God and bitterness delivered to the Hollywood elites is the embodiment of this problem.

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JLM 6 years, 2 months ago

You should wish that President Bush had a few more "cronies" like Dr Condoleezza Rice, pal.

The woman got her undergrad degree and PhD from the University of Denver, was the Provost of Stanford running one of the most complex centers of higher learning in the world, served on numerous corporate boards (Chevron, Schwab, Rand, Notre Dame, Transamerica, HP), wrote several scholarly books (you would love her bright little tome --- "Uncertain Allegiance: The Soviet Union and the Czechoslovak Army" --- talk about a thriller) and in her part time is a classic pianist of professional standards.

Not bad for a black chic from Montgomery, eh?

If this is cronyism, count me in. LOL

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JLM 6 years, 2 months ago

Actually, I don't think I mentioned "rock stars" but you do raise a good point.

On one hand you have an affected GQ poseur trying to emulate "Ich bin ein Berliner" --- of course, it might have been advisable to actually have been ELECTED first, just a little detail --- morphing to a runway model complete with his own Temple of Doom.

On the other you have a championship point guard, beauty queen, small town Mayor, mother of 5, most popular Governor in history, fisherwoman and moose hunter.

Hmmm, can you say "real" phoney v well, just "real"?

I actually very much dig Obama's rock star persona. He does it very well but it really is just an act. It comes off a bit Lindsay Lohan-ish. Just like his comments about those poor bitter folks in Pennsylvania "clinging" to their guns and God. What a two faced phoney!

Well, he's right. The Saracuda does cling to her guns and the moose (well, maybe, "mooses"?) in Alaska --- THEY FEAR HER! [BTW, wildlife biologists are reporting a high incidence of Democrat tendency among Alaskan moose. Kinda the way that Democrats FEAR HER, no?]

Give me a "real" moose hunting, fishing, beauty queen Governor every time over a poseur and fakir! But, hey, that's just me!

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Matthew Stoddard 6 years, 2 months ago

Rice has been one of the better ones, I'll admit, but she is still a Yes-Woman. The little line about scolding Russia for invading a sovereign nation in this day and age...show's she's willing to put the blinders on.

Russia went in supposedly after Georgia (our democratic friend) went into an area (South Ossetia) who declared their independence from Georgia in 1991. (Gee- would we have done this to Alaska if Todd Palin's old pals had gotten their wish to secede from the USA?) There is still no evidence Russia provoked it. In fact, we're scolding Russia for following the USA tried and true method: Shock & Awe.

So when Rice gets a little more backbone to stand on her own 2 feet as Powell did, I'll have more respect for her.

and here Mr Duckels- a self-styled Conservative, says "A degree is a paper that says the liberal establishment has agreed that you have met their curriculum." I guess Condi fits that, too, right? So in essence, everything you just typed is all for naught.

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JLM 6 years, 2 months ago

The situtation with Georgia is fraught with peril. First, we have sent the wrong signal by suggesting that little countries (even democracies) on the edge of the Russian bear's lair should be considered for membership in NATO. NATO is a mutual defense treaty and requires a nation to go to war if a member nation is attacked. It is a strategic military alliance which binds Europe together. It is not a drinking club or college fraternity. It is serious business.

Frankly, Georgia has no strategic value to the US or NATO. None whatsoever. It is not worthy of spilling American blood. Further, it is military folly to pick a fight with an enemy whose supply lines are 10 miles long while ours are 10,000 miles long.

Having said that, the Russians are and always will be a bunch of bloody b*stards. They cynically attacked Georgia during the beginning of the Olympics in order to teach a lesson to Europe and the US that the Russian bear was alive and well.

Putin --- he of the soulful eyes --- is a KGB guy who knew neither America nor Europe would rise to the bait to defend Georgia thereby teaching Europe a valuable lesson.

Do not miss sight of the fact that Putin has spent an enormous amount of his nation's new oil revenue on refitting the Russian army while controlling the flow of gas and oil to Europe.

This is a very dangerous situation and America should be extremely cautious about sending ships into that region.

The failure to identify 350 Russian tanks marshalling along the Georgia border is a huge intelligence blunder. Tanks do not just drive down the street, they are moved on flatbed rail cars. We should have known about this for at least 2 weeks.

The only saving grace is that the Russian leadership has awakened us to their continuing legacy of mischief --- beware Caribbean Russian naval maneuvers and the alliance with Venezuela in our hemisphere.

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Matthew Stoddard 6 years, 2 months ago

Bad intel strikes again, eh? Is that what you are saying? And Russia attacked Georgia AFTER they went into South Ossetia. Russia has always had a pressence there. South Ossetia WANTS the freedom to go where they please, even it that means Russia. And remember- Bush "looked into Putin's soul," or whatever Harlequin romance cliche he used. LOL!

As for alliances...I think with the help of my fellow Republicans...we've burned a few bridges in the last 8yrs, and those that were already burning, we went in and carpet bombed the bridge instead of dousing them with water.

So Russia is using oil revenue...wait! We spent money on oil & billions in trying find a way to open up more drilling, which both sides admit won't lower gas prices significantly (nor will the overall price of oil going down, evidently) and didn't bother to put those billions toward newer energy sources to free ourselves not only from foreign oil...but from oil altogether. Pipe dream, right? Why? Because people would rather spend billions naysaying it instead of billions backing it up.

And all the while, we could have been sitting on Iraq (saving more billions of dollars) while confining Bin Laden and Al-Qaeda to Afghanistan. This would have then not overtaxed our military might, allowing a little more intimidation to be thrust where needed...Iran or North Korea, since they were the ones that were actually nuclear capable. Yep- we bit the dog getting fed instead of the hand feeding it, which was stupid since that dog couldn't feed itself.

But of course, we justified it with bad intel...and kept saying it was necessary even if it wasn't completely right. And that circle comes back to backing Georgia, who we have no (good)intel on Russia invading them first, making us back a "democratic" country that invaded someone who didn't want a part of them to begin with.

Mistakes of the past continue to be mistakes of the present.

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Jason Krueger 6 years, 2 months ago

JLM- Colin Powell was forced out due to his beliefs not being in lock-step with GW and his cronies. Paulson- despite this financial crisis occurring under HIS watch, now wants unlimited authority to distribute $700 billion in our money with zero oversight and zero accountability. Good call there JLM. Robert Gates was a good call but who was there before him? Rumsfeld; a right-wing fear monger, incredibly narrow minded, insubordinate, and heavily mixed up with the past 20 years of botched international US diplomacy. Again, you refuse to acknowledge the mountains of these peoples mistakes. As for Dr. Rice she has continually lost IQ points the longer she's been in position. Her most recent overly simplistic comment regarding Georgia caused the whole world to note she was "the pot calling the kettle black" (no, this isn't racist, it's a cliche). Sorry JLM- if your writing represents the "common man" then I do not wish to possess those traits. And if you and the "common man" choose to continue to hold onto such emotion drivern rethoric like "clinging to god and guns" while the country around you falls into a chasm of nationalisation, be my guest. I however see the following: You (Republican's) have had over 1 decade to get it right. During that time you have driven this country over more cliffs than can be counted and have refused to aknowledge even the slightest amount of reponsibility for the behavior.

Let me put it in words your flag-waving, holier-than-thou mind can understand. You failed. You and your policies have bankrupted this country, our military and our morals. Your party has not decreased federal spending but has increased it. Your party has been 100% responsible for the dollar being worth less than the paper its printed on. Your party has resulted in thousands of lives lost in a mismanaged and ill-conceived war. Your party failed to respond when half the southern coast was destroyed by a hurricane. Your party has time and time again turned its back on scientific achievement and innovation whether it be in health-care, energy development, or physical sciences in favor of emotion-based theology. Your party while insisting it is full of god-fearing Christians has turned is back on the "least among us" by eliminating social programs and public education. Your party has held blindly to allegiances based solely on loyalty rather than merit. And your party has refused to face questioning on any of these issues by instead choosing to hide behind a bastardization of the word patriotism using the American flag not as a symbol of this country's greatness but as a cloak concealing its worst traits. Even today, your party is incapable of proposing any new ideas but resorts to insulting and belittling the other party's candidate. Is this your definition of honor and character? Congratulations JLM, your Party succeeded and this country is now paying the bill.

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JLM 6 years, 2 months ago

The South Ossetians are ethnic Russians but they are part of a sovereign democratic nation. The violence which precipitated the action of the Georgian government was started by Ossetian insurgents. I think the Georgian government was more than a bit heavy handed in putting down the rebellion and this act undoubtedly was used by Russia as a "provocation." But Russia has no right to interfere in the affairs of a neighboring sovereign nation. Much as I would like to invade Canada or Mexico, eh? LOL

This matter has been brewing for a long time and was not made better by the Russians issuing S Ossetians passports several years ago thereby attempting to make them "Russians" and justifying future actions.

This would be tantamount to Canada issuing Wyomans Canadian passports and coming to their "defense" when made to conform to US laws.

In any event, we do not need to become involved in the affairs of small nations who are on the border of Russia as we have no strategic interest there.

There is bad intel and even badder news. Way more than 50% of all intelligence is "bad." This is because we obtain much of it from scumbags willing to betray their countries, we pay for much of it and because nations engage in huge misinformation campaigns to scramble the real picture. Remember that Saddam Hussein himself said they had WMDs even when he knew he risked invasion. Talk about misinformation.

Analysis takes bad intel and attempts to make it connect with good intel. Kind of like putting rotten meat into a stew. All of this gets cooked up into NIEs (national intelligence estimates) which are out of date before they go to the printer.

Remember when Andropov was a big "jazz fan"? Unfortunately, this is the real nature of the intel biz. Feeling around in the mud for a nugget of gold.

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Matthew Stoddard 6 years, 2 months ago

There is still no evidence as to who provoked whom first in the Ossetia fun, though. They say Georgia started first, and vice-versa from Georgia. Still- the region wanted it's independence from Georgia. Why shouldn't we support that as much? Just because they want to be a part of Russia by their own choosing?

And yes- bad intel is a pain. Unfortunately, it keeps coming up in our blunders and all Republicans do is shrug their shoulders and say, "Oh well."

I'm not keen on Obama winning, but after seeing my party misfire on some key things during Bush's tenure, I feel it's time for someone else to try. That's why I'm still reading up on 3rd party candidates. This same back-n-forth will continue to go on until a strong 3rd party candidate comes along and isn't as nuts as Perot.

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JLM 6 years, 2 months ago

Bad intel is not a political product, it is a product of the intelligence community. Intelligence is a very, very tough game and it is only made harder by attempting to politicize it.

The history of S Ossetia is pretty clear and is really not subject to much interpretation or debate. The timeline is clear. The Russians couldn't give a whit about S Ossetia --- it's all about showing NATO and the US who is boss.

Put your mind at ease, Obama is not going to win.

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Matthew Stoddard 6 years, 2 months ago

I have to disagree, then. I believe Obama will win. While Biden is having a hard problem remembering that it was Hoover in the White House (before TV) when the Great Depression hit, Palin is getting caught in a few vocal gaffes herself. Just watch the Couric interview when asked about McCain's advisor's firm still collecting money until last month from Freddie Mac, when McCain had denied this was happening any longer. She had to give the word-for-word stock answer twice.

She also fumbled on trying to "qualify" her statement about how seeing Russia from Alaska was tantamount to having some foreign policy experience, but couldn't cite a single reason why. Hey! I've actually met 2 Presidents (got to swim with Ford instead of being kicked out of the Presidio pool), numerous ambassadors & heads of state, had Dick Cheney fire from my tank for a Dog & Pony show at Ft. Carson while I was there; all except for Cheney before I was 12yrs old. Heck- I've even been to Epcot's World Pavillion!! I still don't consider myself brimming with Foreign Policy experience, but it's more than Palin had until 2 days ago.

And now McCain having to ride in on his white horse to help save the Senate Bill that both parties had pretty much already hammered out (read today's reports- even on Fox News) and needed to suspend his campaign just to do that...even though it wasn't really necessary. What's funny is that it's Bush's yes-men in Congress that are balking at it, and the Democrats that were asking for the lower amount provision.

Then, Obama gives the embarrassment quip of a Pres having to multitask...Yeah- I'm almost certain Obama WILL win this election. We all know that debates aren't McCain's strong point, and obviously, Palin isn't trained to deal with Biden yet.

As for Russian not having any right to invade a neighboring sovereign nation...while not neighbors, didn't we do that to Iraq, Afghanistan, and now we're flying into Pakistan without welcome arms? And why? Because intel tells us something? Well, we both admit that intel has been wrong, whether political or not. The USA and Intel haven't been riding the same bus for a while.

And isn't our side saying Georgia should be allowed into NATO just posturing to the same degree, just to piss off Russia, since you freely admit Georgia brings nothing in general to being in NATO? Two schoolyard children saying their fathers can beat each other up...and we, as a nation, are one of those 2 children.

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JLM 6 years, 2 months ago

Advice for mice:

Never play "cat and mouse" games with a really, really, really big mean cat!

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