Larah Sadar and Corey Lincoln take advantage of mild Leap Day temperatures Friday to get in their second paddling session of the week. The National Weather Service is forecasting increasing cloudiness for today. For more on the Yampa River plan, see page 3.

Photo by Tom Ross

Larah Sadar and Corey Lincoln take advantage of mild Leap Day temperatures Friday to get in their second paddling session of the week. The National Weather Service is forecasting increasing cloudiness for today. For more on the Yampa River plan, see page 3.

Talking about town stretch of Yampa River

Plan comments sought through March 28

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On the 'Net

Craig Robinson, open space supervisor for the city's Department of Parks, Open Space and Recreational Services, said the draft of the Yampa River Structural Master Plan may be found on the city's Web page at www.steamboatspri.... People who do not have high-speed Internet connections may prefer to stop by the Parks and Rec office on Howelsen Parkway and pick up a CD containing the plan.

Robinson can be reached at

<p>crobinson@steam...>

photo

Treating stream bank erosion in Dr. Rich Weiss Park is among the recommendations in the draft of the Yampa River Structural Master Plan. The city is seeking public reaction to the plan.

The city of Steamboat Springs is seeking public reaction to a new master plan that would address the condition of both natural systems and manmade structures on the town stretch of the Yampa River.

The goal of the plan is to address everything from erosion problems to underutilized kayak wave structures. The Department of Parks, Open Space and Recreational Services is inviting public comment on the draft of the Yampa River Structural Master Plan through March 28.

The total cost of projects being recommended by Ecological Resource Consultants is more than $3.5 million.

"Obviously, this is a big number and not something you're going to tackle all at one time," Troy Thompson, president of the consulting firm, told an audience here in January.

Craig Robinson, open space supervisor for the city's Department of Parks, Open Space and Recreational Services, said the study is a follow-up to the Yampa River Management Plan completed several years ago. The difference is that the new Yampa River Structures Master Plan will not deal with conflicts among different forms of human recreation.

"This plan will focus on what we can do to improve the health of the river and the recreation we enjoy on it," Robinson said.

Among the many comments submitted by people who attended the January meeting were recommendations that the Ambulance Barn Hole be rebuilt so it is more friendly to tubers in low water, and that a new kayak surf wave be built below Fifth Street.

The consultants have reached the conclusion that boating activity on the town stretch of the river could be spread out with more effective wave structures.

"Despite the high number of features available, discussions with the boating community indicated that two specific features, Charlie's Hole and the D-Hole, receive far more use than any of the other park and play structures," the study concludes. "Other features typically only function well under a small range of flows or do not function as intended. This results in underutilization of most of the boating features and crowding at the most popular locations."

A number of people suggested that the first consideration should always be the health of the river's natural environment.

Other people noted two areas - the confluence with Fish Creek and the stretch of river adjacent to the Stock Bridge Transit Center - where industrial debris remains in the river after many years and needs to be cleaned up.

- To reach Tom Ross, call 871-4205

or e-mail tross@steamboatpilot.com

Comments

localboy17 6 years, 6 months ago

Finally the city council is doing something good for the town. I'm surprised that they didnt want to put a sidewalk, or build a two story apartment/store front buildings where the river used to be. New features would be great for many recreational uses, not just kayaking although that is the most important. It would lessen the concentration of people and their damage (dogs, trash, use) on the c-hole and make it so the enitre river gets used, or less wear in a single area. While they are at it, why dont they fix the iron horse wave, the rabbit ears.

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ColoradoNative 6 years, 6 months ago

How about applying that 3.5 Million dollars on fixing the traffic. The river is fine.

The river already resembles something you'd see at Water World. It's a natural resource. Treat it as such.

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beentheredonethat 6 years, 6 months ago

how about leaving the river alone? anytime well intentioned folks get into the game of "improving" nature, they make things worse for the long term. if anything, bring it back to it's most natural state, and then get the hell out of there, so that future generations can experience what a real river looks like.

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lucanski 6 years, 6 months ago

It is easy to get ahead of ourselves on a portion of the river that runs through our town. This mind set almost loses the main sight of having a river near by. It is nice to have the Yampa as our playground, but to adjust it to our liking is not realistic. It would be nice to keep one natural structure in a town filled with altered man made things. If these ideas are acted upon, there is no telling how much we will want to continue altering our playground in the future. Rivers erode...adjust yourselves accordingly...not by adjusting the rivers.

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another_local 6 years, 6 months ago

We needed to pay for another "study" to find out that the kyakers like that hole by the library?

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Martha D Young 6 years, 6 months ago

Aside from the confluence of the Yampa River and Fish Creek, and the industrial debris by the transit center, what other "health" issues will be addressed? The cleanliness of our waterways concerns us all, whether we use the rivers for recreation or not.

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localboy17 6 years, 6 months ago

people like kayaking, people like tubing, people like fishing and swimming in the river. you can't tell me that the c-hole is a horrible additon to the river, and the z-hole? They are all great features in the river. People like them, tourists in tubes like them. Putting the c-hole in the river didn't damage anything, it didnt ruin anything, it made a nice usable feature to all recreation.

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424now 6 years, 6 months ago

I'm all for facilitating access to the river.

As to modifying it, not so much.

You have you z and c holes. Focus on the things intended for the land next to the river.

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colobob 6 years, 6 months ago

although well intentioned, whenever we as humans try to fix mother nature by "improving it" we usually end up creating more problems than we solve. Like many here I say leave the river alone and aside from keeping it free of trash and debris let it run its own course. If you need faster water or bigger holes head toward State Bridge, it's a short ride and it's all there. Don't know why we always have to improve on that which God created. Maybe if we feel the need to improve something we could start by improving ourselves first and for once just let nature be.

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