Looking back for June 1: ASC committee has many duties

Advertisement

50 years ago

From the Thursday, May 29, 1958, edition of The Steamboat Pilot:

Three men represent 90 percent of the farmers and ranchers in Routt County on the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation policy-forming committee.

They are Harold J. Denker of Hayden, Kelly Klumker of Toponas and William R. Appel of Steamboat Springs. Denker, 33, is the youngest of the group and the chairman of the committee.

These men work in conjunction with the ASC office manager, Betty Fulton, and her staff in the eight programs sponsored by the government to stimulate farmers to improve their farms, obey wheat quotas, participate in the Soil Bank, take commodity loans, enjoy wool incentive payments and otherwise benefit from governmental aid.

Elected, the committeemen put in 16 to 20 hours a month on their ASC jobs, earning $12 for eight hours of work. They are always on hand in each of their districts to give advice and information to ranchers and farmers about the ASC program.

Chairman Denker came to Routt County from Illinois in 1949. Born and reared on a farm, he now farms 800 acres of his own in Hayden, where he is active in many other ways. He is chairman of the West Routt County Soil Conservation Service, sits on the Hayden Town Board and is mayor pro-tem and a trustee for the Lutheran Church.

During his spare time in the winter months, Denker works in the oil fields west of Steamboat. He has been on the ASC county committee for two and a half years. He is married and has two children.

New owners have opened restaurant at Hahn's Peak

Mr. and Mrs. William Murray arrived last week from Texas and have opened the eating place at Hahn's Peak they purchased last fall from Mr. and Mrs. C.D. McFadden. L.B. Parrish of Andrews, Texas, also is associated with the Murrays.

The restaurant at Hahn's Peak now is open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily, and fried chicken, short orders and sandwiches are served.

The new owners plan many improvements at the Hahn's Peak property, which has one of the most beautiful settings in the nation. Eventually, a large lodge will be built.

The purchase included many building lots and other property at the site of the once booming gold mining town that for many years was the county seat.

The owners received an immense amount of publicity in Dallas and other Texas papers because of their purchase of a "ghost town" and their plans for rebuilding it into one of Colorado's great vacation spots.

"There are many thousands in the Southwest who are looking for a cool, restful spot to spend their vacation," Mr. Murray said this week.

"Many have seen only the eastern slope of Colorado and do not realize what great advantages we have in this particular land," he said.

"We are sold on Routt County as offering more than being part of the Rocky Mountains, and we are certain there will be a great surge of visitors when people realize the spectacular beauty, the ideal weather and the many other vacation opportunities that are unsurpassed here. We are surprised that not many people have found out about it sooner."

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Requires free registration

Posting comments requires a free account and verification.